Tuberculosis - TB Safety and Information

Promising Class of Antibiotics Discovered for Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis:

TB Safety Early in 1996 OSHA issued Tuberculosis Directives that enforce the 1994 Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Tuberculosis Prevention Guidelines, and allow for the wearing of new classes of NIOSH approved respirators/masks as well as HEPA masks.
Our training products on "Guarding Against Tuberculosis in Institutional Environments" include the changes in respiratory protection requirements. These products are designed to assist facilities and operations whose employees have a risk of exposure to tuberculosis. They also help employees understand the nature of the disease, as well as what they can do to protect themselves from infection.

Topics concerning TB Safety include:

  • Epidemiology and symptoms of tuberculosis.
  • Modes by which tuberculosis is transmitted.
  • The CDC Guidelines.
  • The Exposure Control Plan.
  • Recognition of exposure situations.
  • Practices to prevent exposure.
  • Administrative and engineering controls.
  • Selection and use of personal protective equipment (including respirators).
  • and more.

Get a Quote for a Class:
Tuberculosis in Institutional Environments Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have discovered a promising new class of antibiotics that could aid efforts to overcome drug-resistance in tuberculosis (TB), a global killer. The drugs increased survival of mice infected with TB and were effective against drug-resistant strains of TB. St. Jude led the international research effort, results of which appear in the current issue of the journal Nature Medicine. The antibiotics, called spectinamides, were created by changing the chemical structure of an existing antibiotic, spectinomycin, which does not work against TB. In multiple trials of mice with both active and chronic TB infections, researchers report that one version of the new drug—an analog known as 1599—was as good as or better than current TB drugs at reducing levels of the bacteria in the lungs of mice. In addition, 1599 caused no serious side effects.

Source: http://www.stjude.org/

See Tuberculosis Safety Training Materials

Leave a Reply

Sorry, you must be logged in to post a comment.

Back to top