youth

  • Webinar Tomorrow: STEP into Preparedness

    Join the Federal Emergency Management Agency on Thursday, January 11, 2016, as we present the newly updated Student Tools for Emergency Planning (STEP) materials and share tips and lessons learned from teaching the program.

    STEP is a classroom-based emergency preparedness curriculum that teaches fourth and fifth-graders about emergencies and how to create a disaster supply kit and family emergency communications plan.

    CERT Gear & Supplies CERT Gear & Supplies

    Title: Step into Preparedness
    Date: Thursday, February 11, 2016
    Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EST

    Featured Speakers:

    • Louise Gorham, Health Imperatives
    • Tod Pritchard, Wisconsin Emergency Management
    • Robert Scata, Connecticut Emergency Management and Homeland Security

    Read these to get Ready! Youth PreparednessYouth Preparedness CouncilUpdate on Youth Preparedness

    How to Join the Student Tools for Emergency Planning Webinar: Click Here

  • Update on Youth Preparedness Council

    March_1The Youth Preparedness Council offers an opportunity for youth leaders to serve on a distinguished national council and participate in the Youth Preparedness Council Summit. During their two-year term, the leaders will have the opportunity to complete a national-level group project and to share their opinions, experiences, ideas, solutions and questions regarding youth disaster preparedness with the leadership of FEMA and national youth preparedness organizations.

     

    Council activities and projects center around five areas of engagement: programs, partnerships, events, public speaking/outreach and publishing. Members represent the youth perspective on emergency preparedness and share information with their communities. They also meet with FEMA on a regular basis to provide ongoing input on strategies, initiatives, and projects throughout the duration of their term. 

    CERT-gearFEMA 101: Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)

    CERT in Action

    Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Programs

    History of the CERT Program

    CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) Update

  • Youth Preparedness

    We talk about Youth a lot - while Child Safety is certainly a big area of interest in our Industry, we think Teens, Tweens, and the like need more focus as they are the adults of tomorrow.

    We've shared information about dangers for Teens such as the  Youth Tobacco SurveyYouth and Teen Safety & Violence and the importance of Safety and Injuries in Youth Sports.

    We also have shown the power of this group in activities and programs such as the Youth Preparedness CouncilHelping Hands First Aid, and How Teens can get involved and give back to the Community.

    We aren't the only ones. Here's some newer Youth Preparedness info:

    Youth Preparedness Council Application Period Opens Soon

    The Youth Preparedness Council brings together leaders from across the country who are interested and engaged in advocating youth preparedness. Council members are selected based on their dedication to public service, their efforts in making a difference in their communities, and their potential to expand their impact as national advocates for youth preparedness. The application period will close in early March.

    Webinar: Preparing Youth for Disasters

    The Individual and Community Preparedness Division is pleased to invite you to a webinar on Thursday, February 4, 2016, focused on engaging the public on disaster preparedness and resilience efforts serving youth.
    Title: Preparing Youth for Disasters
    Date: Thursday, February 4, 2016
    Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. EST
    Featured Speakers:
    • Bruce Lockwood, Acting Captain, Emergency Management Division, East Hartford Fire Department, CT; Former Commissioner, National Commission on Children and Disasters, will share the background on the unique needs of children in a disaster and the importance of preparedness planning and education.
    • Sarah Thompson, Save the Children, will exchange information on Save the Children’s Prep Rally, which helps children learn the basics of emergency preparedness through engaging activities and games and can be formatted to fit your program.
    • Hilary Palotay, American Red Cross, will share information on the Pillowcase Project, a preparedness education program for children in grades 3–5.
    • Captain Rob Tosatto, Medical Reserve Corps & Jane Shovlin, Arizona Health Occupations Students of America, will share information on the partnership between Medical Reserve Corps and HOSA and how to engage youth in contributing to school and community preparedness.

    How to Join the Webinar:
    • Connect using Adobe Connect Registration Web Link

    Webinar: STEP into Preparedness

    Join the FEMA Individual and Community Preparedness Division on Thursday, February 11, 2016, as we present the newly updated Student Tools for Emergency Planning (STEP) materials and share tips and lessons learned from teaching the program.
    STEP is a classroom-based emergency preparedness curriculum that teaches fourth and fifth-graders about emergencies and how to create a disaster supply kit and family emergency communications plan.
    Title: STEP Into Preparedness
    Date: Thursday, February 11, 2016
    Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EST
    Featured Speakers:
    • Louise Gorham, Health Imperatives
    • Tod Pritchard, Wisconsin Emergency Management
    • Robert Scata, Connecticut Emergency Management and Homeland Security

    How to Join the Webinar:
    • Connect using Adobe Connect Registration Web Link

    Teen

  • Youth violence can be prevented

    "" ALSO READ:

    Research and experience in communities show it is possible to prevent youth violence. Everyone has an important role in stopping youth violence before it starts. CDC's Preventing Youth Violence: Opportunities for Action [PDF 2.3MB] and its companion guide, Taking Action to Prevent Youth Violence [PDF 1.7MB], provide information and action steps to help each of us be a part of the solution.

  • FEMA seeks Young Americans for Youth Preparedness Council

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is seeking applicants for its Youth Preparedness Council.

    Ready_Back_Cover_Print_EN_20061215.inddThe Youth Preparedness Council is a unique opportunity for youth leaders to serve on a highly distinguished national council and participate in the Youth Preparedness Council Summit. Additionally, the youth leaders have the opportunity to complete a self-selected youth preparedness project and to share their opinions, experiences, ideas, solutions and questions regarding youth disaster preparedness with the leadership of FEMA and national youth preparedness organizations. Once selected, members serve on the Council for one year, with the option to extend for an additional year, if formally requested by FEMA.

    Council activities and projects center around five key areas of engagement: Programs, Partnerships, Events, Public Speaking/Outreach and Publishing. Members represent the youth perspective on emergency preparedness and share information with their communities. They also meet with FEMA on a regular basis to provide ongoing input on strategies, initiatives and projects throughout the duration of their term.

    Prepare and Endure! Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, too, you should Check your Emergency Supplies:
    Count your stock... is it enough?
    Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    Keep cash on hand
    Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.

    Any individual between the ages of 12 and 17 who is engaged in individual and community preparedness or who has experienced a disaster that has motivated him or her to make a positive difference in his or her community, may apply to serve on the Youth Preparedness Council. Individuals who applied last year are highly encouraged to apply again. Adults working with youth and/or community preparedness are encouraged to share the application with youth who might be interested in applying.

    Youth interested in applying to the Council must submit a completed application form and two  letters of recommendation. Specific information about completing and submitting the application and attachments can be found in the application instructions. All applications and supporting materials must be received no later than February 24, 2014, 11:59 p.m. EST in order to be eligible. New Youth Preparedness Council members will be announced in May 2014.

    FEMAFor more information about the Youth Preparedness Council and to access the application materials, please visit http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council.

  • Sudden death of young Americans

    A registry of deaths in young people from conditions such as heart disease and epilepsy is being created to help researchers define the scope of the problem and set future research priorities. The National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are collaborating to create the Sudden Death in the Young Registry.

    NIH and CDC launch registry for sudden death in the young - Initiative will collect population-based information on sudden, unexpected deaths in youth.

    "The sudden death of a child is tragic and the impact on families and society is incalculable," said Jonathan Kaltman, M.D., chief of the Heart Development and Structural Diseases Branch within the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences at the NIH's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). "This registry will collect comprehensive, population-based information on sudden unexpected death in youths up to age 24 in the United States. It is a critical first step toward figuring out how to best prevent these tragedies."

    Cases of sudden cardiac death or sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) are not routinely or systematically reported, and no commonly agreed upon standards or definitions for reporting currently exist. Complete information has not been collected on the incidences, causes, and risk factors for sudden death in the young. The lack of evidence fuels disagreements about the best prevention approach. Sudden cardiac death, also called sudden cardiac arrest, happens when the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating and blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs. CPR can help (Everyone should Learn CPR) but what lies beneath these deaths?nihlogo

    Researchers know that the risk for sudden death in the young increases if the person has a heart-related condition. Examples include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (thick heart muscle), congenital abnormalities or disorders of the coronary arteries that supply the heart with blood, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (a heart muscle problem), long QT syndrome (a disorder of the heart's electrical activity), or other heart abnormalities. Additionally, individuals who have epilepsy may die suddenly and unexpectedly, without a structural or drug-related cause of death found at autopsy. Little is known about how often SUDEP occurs or about factors that put any individual with epilepsy at risk.

    The registry will estimate the incidence of sudden death in infants, children, and young adults by collecting comprehensive data on each recorded case. The registry is an expansion of the CDC's Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Case Registry, which currently tracks sudden unexpected deaths in children up to age 1 in nine states.

    Infant CPR Anytime is an “all-in-one” learning kit that teaches the basic skills of Infant CPR, Infant choking relief and calling for help in approximately 20 minutes. Infant CPR Anytime allows users to learn these life-saving skills anywhere, either in the comfort of their own home or in large group settings. The kit teaches CPR using the AHA’s research-proven “practice-while-watching” technique, which allows users to watch an instructional DVD while practicing their skills on a personal manikin. Infant CPR Anytime is designed to be shared with close family members and friends to help extend lifesaving training to more people. Because more lives can be saved…. Product Specifications: The Infant CPR Anytime kit includes the following: · 1 bilingual (English/Spanish) Infant CPR Anytime DVD · 1 poly-bagged Mini Baby® CPR personal manikin · 1 bilingual (English/Spanish) Infant CPR Anytime skills reminder card · 1 Mini Baby replacement lung · Manikin wipes CPR Anytime is an “all-in-one” learning kit that teaches the basic skills of CPR, Available in Adult/Child or Infant Programs

    State public health agencies will be able to apply to the CDC to participate in the registry in 2014. The registry will track all sudden unexpected deaths in youths up to age 24 in as many as 15 states or major metropolitan areas. Child death review teams from each state will examine findings from death scene investigations and will review and compile information from medical records, autopsy reports, and other pertinent data sources for each case. A panel of medical experts, medical examiners, and forensic pathologists will help to develop and guide the implementation of standardized autopsy protocols and case definitions.

    Data will be entered into a centralized database managed by a data coordinating center at the Michigan Public Health Institute. After obtaining parental consent, blood samples from a subset of cases will be sent to a centralized biorepository. The data will not contain personally identifiable information. The resulting registry will become a resource for scientists to learn more about the causes of sudden death in the young and ultimately to develop better diagnostic and prevention approaches.

    The NIH's NHLBI will analyze data related to sudden cardiac death while the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) will participate in the registry by reviewing data on SUDEP.

    The Sudden Death in the Young Registry is jointly funded by the NHLBI, the NINDS, and the CDC.

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