Tuberculosis

  • TB

    TB or not TB - great strides are being made against Tuberculosis.

    Get Safety Training Materials on Tuberculosis Get Safety Training Materials on Tuberculosis

    Globally, two billion people are infected with tuberculosis (TB), the world’s leading infectious disease killer.

    TB is deadly and it can also be resistant to antibiotics. Each year, half a million cases across the globe are drug-resistant, meaning the drugs used to treat TB will not kill the bacteria.

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is the deadliest and most dangerous type. It is resistant to at least four of the best anti-TB drugs and has spread worldwide. Now in more than 105 countries worldwide, XDR-TB is at least 20 times costlier to treat and takes more than two years to cure. In most places, less than half of all patients treated are cured, with death rates as high as 80 percent.

    TB continues to spread. - World TB Day: End Tuberculosis - TB may resist, but it can be beaten - TB Threatens to Kill 75 Million People - TB: Know about Tuberculosis - Tuberculosis – TB Safety and Information

    World Tuberculosis Day

    March 24th marks the day in 1882 when German microbiologist Robert Koch announced he had discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes this ancient scourge. Today, in recognition of World TB Day, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), reasserts its commitment to improving our understanding of TB and how to prevent, diagnose and treat it. Around the globe, researchers and the public health community are united in working toward these goals.  TB-Unite to End

  • TB continues to spread.

    While World TB Day was just a few days ago, awareness and efforts to end the Spread of Tuberculosis need to  continue year round. According to the CDC, after twenty years of annual declines in reported tuberculosis (TB) cases, progress toward TB elimination in the United States appears to have stalled.

    Understand that TB is not blatantly obvious - not everyone infected with TB bacteria is sick; millions of US residents have latent TB infection and could become sick with TB disease at some point in their lives.

    The CDC and others work hard to provide resources for providers, patients, and to  offer TB programs that can strengthen efforts to diagnose, treat, and ultimately eliminate TB disease and latent TB infections.

    Resources for TB Programs

    Protect yourself against the risk of Tuberculosis exposure. Our safety booklets, CD-ROMS, DVD programs, and compliance kits will provide you and your employees with all the information you need regarding prevention of Tuberculosis. Following OSHA standards, you can rest assured that you are compliant within your industry. There is even a poster available to serve as a daily reference.
  • World Tuberculosis Day 2016

    Remember Today is World Tuberculosis Day.

    The 2016 World TB Day theme is Unite to End TB.

    Spread the word.TB-Unite to End

     

  • World TB Day: End Tuberculosis

    We can end TB.
    Meeting the survivors and supporters we witness harsh truths and deplorable injustice; a treatable disease killing so many. Uniting our collective strength gets us closer to resolution. We can confront stigma, create urgency, activate support and push for progress.

    With advocacy, perseverance and passion we can reach everyone who needs treatment, build stronger communities and celebrate success that saves lives. TB is not just another global statistic it equals lives at threat. It is humanity’s problem to solve. For our children. For our future. For all of us. We deserve to be free of this disease. Let’s End TB.TB-Day

    World TB Day, falling on March 24th each year, is designed to build public awareness that tuberculosis today remains an epidemic in much of the world, causing the deaths of nearly one-and-a-half million people each year, mostly in developing countries. It commemorates the day in 1882 when Dr Robert Koch astounded the scientific community by announcing that he had discovered the cause of tuberculosis, the TB bacillus. At the time of Koch's announcement in Berlin, TB was raging through Europe and the Americas, causing the death of one out of every seven people. Koch's discovery opened the way towards diagnosing and curing TB.

    Tuberculosis

    Protect yourself against the risk of Tuberculosis exposure. Our safety booklets, CD-ROMS, DVD programs, and compliance kits will provide you and your employees with all the information you need regarding prevention of Tuberculosis. Following OSHA standards, you can rest assured that you are compliant within your industry. There is even a poster available to serve as a daily reference.

    More reading: TB: Know about TuberculosisTuberculosis – TB Safety and InformationTB may resist, but it can be beatenTB Threatens to Kill 75 Million People

    TB-Red-ArrowThe Red Arrow: A Symbol to Unite Us Against TB

    The Red Arrow is a symbol for our goal: a world without TB. It represents our unwavering commitment to move forward with this mission until we reach the finish line. Because despite its devastating impact as the world’s leading infectious killer, there is still the troubling fact that most people in the world think of TB as a disease of the past.

    The Red Arrow was developed with the input of thousands of partners in the TB community. The symbol belongs to no single organization, person, tagline, or agenda. It represents our unity against TB, and it’s in your hands to shape, mold, and give meaning to.

  • TB may resist, but it can be beaten

    TB-1We've shared information about what you should know about Tuberculosis, as well as Tuberculosis safety and information. This is an important matter, since TB threatens to kill 75 million people. Now the CDC tells us how we can beat this killer.

    With a half million new cases each year, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is spreading around the globe. The world must act decisively. There can be no delay. That is why on Dec 22 President Obama announced the National Action Plan for Combating Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis -

    The National Action Plan

    Worldwide, only 1 in 5 people with MDR-TB get appropriate treatment. And only half of those treated are cured.

    In our increasingly interconnected world a health threat anywhere is a health threat everywhere. This is particularly true for MDR-TB. The National Action Plan addresses the MDR-TB threat both in the U.S. and overseas. It has three major goals:

    • Fight MDR-TB at home. We must make sure that every person in our country with TB gets appropriate treatment and that those who have been in close contact with infectious TB patients are monitored and, when necessary, also treated.
    • Fight MDR-TB abroad. The U.S. is investing in broader access to diagnosis and treatment, engaging with providers in the most highly affected communities and countries, and developing innovative health technologies. We must accelerate accountable programs to diagnose and effectively treat every patient, for their sake and the world’s.
    • Speed up research and development of new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat TB and MDR-TB.

    The National Action Plan dovetails with major efforts already underway. For example, the Global Health Security Agenda, launched in 2014, aims to improve all nations’ ability to find, stop, and prevent disease outbreaks. More than 70 countries have joined the United States in this internationally-led effort.

    And in March 2015, the White House announced the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, strengthening efforts to slow the emergence and spread of treatment-resistant diseases such as MDR-TB.

    Read more at CDC: We can stop drug-resistant TB – if we act now

    Get Safety Training Materials on Tuberculosis Get Safety Training Materials on Tuberculosis

    Tuberculosis

    Protect yourself against the risk of Tuberculosis exposure. Our safety booklets, CD-ROMS, DVD programs, and compliance kits will provide you and your employees with all the information you need regarding prevention of Tuberculosis. Following OSHA standards, you can rest assured that you are compliant within your industry. There is even a poster available to serve as a daily reference.
  • TB Threatens to Kill 75 Million People

    Tuberculosis - Drug-resistant TB Threatens to Kill 75 Million People by 2050, Cost $16.7 Trillion.

    Over the next 35 years, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis will kill 75 million people and could cost the global economy a cumulative $16.7 trillion - the equivalent of the European Union’s annual output, a UK parliamentary group said. If left untackled, the spread of drug-resistant TB superbugs threatens to shrink the world economy by 0.63 percent annually, the UK All Party Parliamentary Group on Global Tuberculosis (APPG TB) said, urging governments to do more to improve research and cooperation. "The rising global burden of multidrug-resistant TB and other drug-resistant infections will come at a human and economic cost which the global community simply cannot afford to ignore", economist Jim O'Neill said in a statement. The WHO said last year multidrug-resistant TB was at "crisis levels", with about 480,000 new cases in 2013.

    Learn more about TB -

    Source: http://www.reuters.com/

  • Tuberculosis - TB Safety and Information

    Promising Class of Antibiotics Discovered for Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis:

    TB Safety Early in 1996 OSHA issued Tuberculosis Directives that enforce the 1994 Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Tuberculosis Prevention Guidelines, and allow for the wearing of new classes of NIOSH approved respirators/masks as well as HEPA masks.
    Our training products on "Guarding Against Tuberculosis in Institutional Environments" include the changes in respiratory protection requirements. These products are designed to assist facilities and operations whose employees have a risk of exposure to tuberculosis. They also help employees understand the nature of the disease, as well as what they can do to protect themselves from infection.

    Topics concerning TB Safety include:

    • Epidemiology and symptoms of tuberculosis.
    • Modes by which tuberculosis is transmitted.
    • The CDC Guidelines.
    • The Exposure Control Plan.
    • Recognition of exposure situations.
    • Practices to prevent exposure.
    • Administrative and engineering controls.
    • Selection and use of personal protective equipment (including respirators).
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Tuberculosis in Institutional Environments Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

    St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have discovered a promising new class of antibiotics that could aid efforts to overcome drug-resistance in tuberculosis (TB), a global killer. The drugs increased survival of mice infected with TB and were effective against drug-resistant strains of TB. St. Jude led the international research effort, results of which appear in the current issue of the journal Nature Medicine. The antibiotics, called spectinamides, were created by changing the chemical structure of an existing antibiotic, spectinomycin, which does not work against TB. In multiple trials of mice with both active and chronic TB infections, researchers report that one version of the new drug—an analog known as 1599—was as good as or better than current TB drugs at reducing levels of the bacteria in the lungs of mice. In addition, 1599 caused no serious side effects.

    Source: http://www.stjude.org/

    See Tuberculosis Safety Training Materials

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