ticks

  • Lyme Disease

    Fight the Bite! Fight the Bite!

    Spring & Summer mean outdoor activities. Outdoors means ticks and risk of Lyme Disease.

    The CDC says: Before gardening, camping, hiking, or just playing outdoors, make tick bite prevention part of your outdoor plans.

    Lyme disease is the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in the United States. An estimated 300,000 infections occur each year, of which only 30,000 are reported to CDC by state health departments.

    The risk is greatest among those living in or visiting New England, the mid-Atlantic states, and the upper Midwest. A recent national survey found that nearly 20 percent of people in areas where Lyme disease is common were unaware of the danger. Fortunately, there are several tactics you and your family can use to prevent tick bites and reduce your risk of tickborne disease.

    Protect Yourself from Tick Bites

    Know where to expect ticks. Blacklegged ticks live in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas. You may come into contact with ticks during outdoor activities around your home or when walking through vegetation such as leaf litter or shrubs. To avoid ticks, walk in the center of trails and avoid tall vegetation.

    Use a repellent with DEET (on skin or clothing) or permethrin (on clothing and gear). Repellents containing 20% or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can be applied to the skin, and they can protect up to several hours. Always follow product instructions! Parents should apply repellents to their children, taking care to avoid application to hands, eyes, and mouth. Products containing permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing, and camping gear. Treated items can remain protective through several washings.

    Tick

  • DEET, showers, and tick checks can stop ticks.

    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    Stop Ticks.

    Reduce your chances of getting a tickborne disease by using repellents, checking for ticks, and showering after being outdoors. If you have a tick bite followed by a fever or rash, seek medical attention.

    Gardening, camping, hiking, and playing outdoors – when enjoying these activities, don't forget to take steps to prevent bites from ticks that share the outdoors. Ticks can infect humans with bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can cause serious illness.

    Before You Go Outdoors

    • Know where to expect ticks. Ticks live in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas. You may come into contact with ticks during outdoor activities around your home or when walking through leaf litter or near shrubs. Always walk in the center of trails in order to avoid contact with ticks.
    • Products containing permethrin kill ticks. Permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing and camping gear and remain protective through several washings.
    • Use a repellent with DEET on skin. Repellents containing 20% or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can protect up to several hours. Always follow product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding the hands, eyes, and mouth. For detailed information about using DEET on children, see recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
    • For detailed information about tick prevention and control, see Avoiding Ticks. Detailed information for outdoor workers can be found at NIOSH Safety and Health Topic: Tick-borne Diseases.

    After You Come Indoors

    Check your clothing for ticks. Ticks may be carried into the house on clothing. Any ticks that are found should be removed. Placing clothes into a dryer on high heat for at least an hour effectively kills ticks.

    Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.

    Check your body for ticks after being outdoors. Conduct a full body check upon return from potentially tick-infested areas, which even includes your back yard. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Check these parts of your body and your child's body for ticks:

    • Under the arms
    • In and around the ears
    • Inside belly button
    • Back of the knees
    • In and around the hair
    • Between the legs
    • Around the waist

    What to Do if You Find an Attached Tick

    Remove the attached tick as soon as you notice it by grasping with tweezers, as close to the skin as possible, and pulling it straight out. For detailed information about tick removal, see the tick removal page.

    Watch for signs of illness such as rash or fever in the days and weeks following the bite, and see a health care provider if these develop. Your risk of acquiring a tick-borne illness depends on many factors, including where you live, what type of tick bit you, and how long the tick was attached. If you become ill after a tick bite, see a health care provider.

    Reduce Ticks in Your Yard

    • Modify your landscape to create Tick-Safe Zones[6.82 MB]. Regularly remove leaf litter and clear tall grasses and brush around homes, and place wood chips or gravel between lawns and wooded areas to keep ticks away from recreational areas, and keep play areas and playground equipment away from away from shrubs, bushes, and other vegetation.
    • Consider using a chemical control agent. Effective tick control chemicals are available for use by the homeowner, or they can be applied by a professional pest control expert, and even limited applications can greatly reduce the number of ticks. A single springtime application of acaricide can reduce the population of ticks that cause Lyme disease by 68–100%.
    • Discourage deer. Removing plants that attract deer and constructing physical barriers may help discourage deer from entering your yard and bringing ticks with them.

    Prevent Ticks on Animals

    Use tick control products to prevent family pets from bringing ticks into the home. Tick collars, sprays, shampoos, or “top spot” medications should be used regularly to protect your animals and your family from ticks. Consult your veterinarian and be sure to use these products according to the package instructions. For more information on animals and health, see Preventing Ticks on Your Pet.
  • Kids are five times more likely than adults to die from Ticks

    TickMisperceptions Keep Kids from Getting Lifesaving Treatment for Tickborne Diseases

    Kids are five times more likely than adults to die from tickborne diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). Doctors often avoid prescribing doxycycline, the most effective RMSF treatment, for young children because the drug’s warning label cautions that tooth staining may be a side effect in children younger than 8 years. A new study published in The Journal of Pediatrics suggests that for patients with RMSF, this warning may be doing more harm than good. The study led by experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Indian Health Service (IHS)  found that short courses of the antibiotic doxycycline can be used in children under 8 years old without staining teeth or weakening tooth enamel.

    Ticks cause Disease – Fight the Bite!

    Source: http://www.cdc.gov/

  • Ticks cause Disease - Fight the Bite!

    Fight the Bite

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    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    TICKS -

    insectrepellents-animated[1]Spray Before You Work or Play

    Blacklegged tick (deer tick) life stages next to a metric ruler. The adult ticks (two ticks at the left) are approximately 1/8 of an inch long, while the nymph (third from left) is just under 1/16 of an inch.

    Blacklegged Ticks (Deer Tick, Bear Tick)

    The scientific name of the blacklegged tick is Ixodes scapularis. Many people still know the blacklegged tick by another common name, the deer tick. You may also hear it called the bear tick. They are all the same tick.

    The blacklegged tick is much smaller than the wood (or dog) tick.

    In this photo, the tick on the left is an adult female deer tick, which is red and dark brown. To her right is an adult male deer tick, which is smaller and dark in color. A nymph deer tick is the second from the right, and a deer tick larva is to the far right. CDC(Scale of image is centimeters.)

    In this photo, the tick on the left is an adult female blacklegged tick, which is red and dark brown. To her right is an adult male blacklegged tick, which is smaller and dark in color. A nymph blacklegged tick is the second from the right, and a blacklegged tick larva is to the far right.

    Adult females and nymphs can transmit infections through their bite.

    Preventing Tick-Transmitted Disease
    Information about minimizing your risk of tick-transmitted diseases, protecting your pets, and removing ticks.

    PROTECT YOURSELF FROM TICK BITES
    Know when you are in tick habitat; this is when it is most important to take precautions:

    • Wooded or brushy areas for the blacklegged tick.
    • Grassy or wooded areas for the American dog tick.

    If you spend time outdoors in tick habitat, use repellent to reduce the risk of disease:

    • DEET-based repellents (up to 30 percent DEET) can be applied to clothing or skin.
    • Pre-treating fabric with permethrin-based repellents can protect against tick bites for at least two weeks without reapplication. This is an excellent option for people who frequently venture into wooded areas.
    • WATCH THE VIDEO ABOUT CLOTHING AND GEAR REPELLENT ?
    [video width="640" height="360" wmv="/blogs/first-aid-mart/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Bens-Clothing-and-Gear.wmv"][/video]

    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    People who live, or spend time at cabins, on heavily wooded property often encounter ticks regularly and should consider managing their landscape to reduce their risk. Consider the following tick habitat management strategies:

    • Keep lawns and trails mowed short.
    • Remove leaves and brush.
    • Create a landscape barrier of wood chips or rocks between mowed lawns and woods.
    • Apply pesticide treatments in the spring or early summer along the edges of wooded yards and trails; follow pesticide label instructions carefully.

    PERFORM DAILY TICK CHECKS
    Perform tick checks after spending time outdoors in tick habitat.  Check your body for ticks by searching your entire body for ticks.  If you find a tick on you, remove it immediately.

    Early detection of tick-borne illness is important to prevent potentially severe complications, so people should seek medical care if they develop symptoms that could be a tick-borne disease after spending time in tick habitat. Signs and symptoms of the various tick-borne diseases can include, but are not limited to, rash, fever, headache, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain or swelling. These symptoms can be associated with other diseases, so it is important for patients to mention possible tick exposures or time spent in tick habitat to their medical provider. Except for Powassan disease, which is caused by a virus, all of Minnesota's tick-borne diseases are treatable with antibiotics.

    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

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  • CPR, Lyme Disease and Olives

    Olives? Well, we don't quite get that reference, but CPR & Lyme Disease are hot topics.

    We carry a large selection of CPR products including Professional CPR & First Aid Training Mannequins, CPR Masks & CPR Mouth Barrier devices, CPR Kits, CPR Prompting devices, Safety Training Videos, CD's and More. We carry a large selection of CPR products 

    With CPR & AED Awareness Month beginning in a few days, there's a lot of talk about CPR - scheduling training classes, getting CPR gear, etc.

    Springtime means outdoor activities, ticks, and Lyme Disease...

    See What the Bangor Daily News has to say about this.

    How to Recognize a Deer Tick and Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease

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