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  • Stroke: What is YOUR risk?

    Risk of Stroke, whether TIA (Transient Ischemic Attack*) or full Cerebro Vascular Attacks varies by heredity, lifestyle, and other factors, but trends exist, and knowing your non-controllable risks can help you determine the importance of watching the controllable risk factors.

    What is little known is that across all ethnicities, about 20% of strokes occur under the age of 20!

    *TIA: A brief stroke-like attack that, despite resolving within minutes to hours, still requires immediate medical attention to distinguish from an actual stroke.

    Stroke deaths, by age group and race and Hispanic origin: average annual, 2010–2013:

    Stroke by Age

    The age distribution of stroke deaths varied by race and Hispanic origin during 2010–2013.

    • More than one-fourth of the stroke deaths among non-Hispanic black persons aged 45 and over (28.6%) occurred to those in the youngest age group (45–64.) By contrast, the portion of stroke deaths in this age group among the other race?ethnicity groups ranged from one-tenth among non-Hispanic white persons (10.0%) to less than one-fourth among Hispanic persons (22.4%).

    Learn how to prevent stroke:

    Stroke mortality among adults aged 45 and over varied by race and Hispanic origin and sex during 2010–2013.

    • The age-adjusted stroke death rate for non-Hispanic black men aged 45 and over (154.8 deaths per 100,000 population) was 54% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white men, 67% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander men, and 68% higher than the rate for Hispanic men of the same age.
    • The rate for non-Hispanic black women (131.4 per 100,000 population) was 30% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white women, 58% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander women, and 61% higher than the rate for Hispanic women of the same age.
    • Non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic men and women had the lowest
      age-adjusted stroke death rates (men: 92.8 and 91.9 per 100,000 population; women: 83.0 and 81.6).
    • Non-Hispanic white men and women aged 45 and over had similar age-adjusted stroke death rates (100.7 and 101.1 deaths per 100,000 population). Men in the other race-ethnicity groups had higher age-adjusted stroke death rates than women of the same race and ethnicity (12% to 18% higher).

    Age-adjusted stroke death rates among men and women aged 45 and over, by race and Hispanic origin: average annual, 2010–2013:

    Hispanic Stroke

    Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality

    • During 2010–2013, the age-adjusted stroke death rate for non-Hispanic black men aged 45 and over (154.8 deaths per 100,000 population) was 54% to 68% higher than the rates for men of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups. The rate for non-Hispanic black women aged 45 and over was 30% to 61% higher than the rates for women of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups.
    • The age distribution of stroke deaths differed by race and ethnicity.
    • Stroke death rates were 32% higher in counties in the lowest median household income quartile than in counties in the highest income quartile.
    • Nonmetropolitan counties had higher stroke death rates than counties at other urbanization levels.
    • Stroke mortality inside and outside the Stroke Belt differed by race and ethnicity.

    Despite steady decreases in U.S. stroke mortality over the past several decades, stroke remained the fourth leading cause of death during 2010–2012 and the fifth leading cause in 2013. Most studies have focused on the excess mortality experienced by black persons compared with white persons and by residents of the southeastern states, referred to as the Stroke Belt. Few stroke mortality studies have focused on Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic persons or have explored urban–rural differences. This report provides updated information about stroke mortality among U.S. residents aged 45 and over during 2010–2013 by age, race and ethnicity, income, urban–rural residence, and residence inside or outside the Stroke Belt. Learn more

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