ready

  • Is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Ready?

    Is the CDC "Ready"?

    While CDC encourages the public to be aware of personal and family preparedness, not all CDC staff practice what they preach. In an effort to increase personal preparedness as part of workforce culture, CDC created the Ready CDC initiative. Targeting the CDC workforce living in metropolitan Atlanta, this program recently completed a pilot within the organization and is evaluating improvements for personal preparedness actions.

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    Apparently so...

    CDC leads the nation in responding to public health emergencies, such as outbreaks and natural disasters. While the agency encourages the public to be aware of personal and family preparedness, not all CDC staff  follow those guidelines. In an effort to increase personal preparedness as part of workforce culture, CDC created the Ready CDC initiative. Targeting the CDC workforce living in metropolitan Atlanta, this program recently completed a pilot within the organization and is currently being evaluated for measurable improvements in recommended personal preparedness actions. Ready CDC is co-branded with the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Ready.gov program, which is designed for local entities to take and make personal preparedness more meaningful to local communities. Ready CDC has done just that; the program uses a Whole Community approach to put personal preparedness into practice.

    IMG_1043_smFEMA’s Whole Community approach relies on community action and behavior change at the local community level to instill a culture of preparedness. To achieve this with Ready CDC, the CDC workforce receives the following:

    • The support needed to participate from their employer
    • Consistent messaging from a trusted, valued source
    • Localized and meaningful personal preparedness tools and resources
    • Expertise and guidance from local community preparedness leaders
    • Personal preparedness education that goes beyond the basic awareness level to practicing actionable behaviors such as making an emergency kit and a family disaster plan

    Are you Ready CDC?

    When the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response Learning Office conducted an environmental scan and literature review, as well as an inward look at the readiness and resiliency of the CDC workforce, the need for a program like Ready CDC emerged. Although CDC has highlighted personal preparedness nationally in its innovative preparedness campaigns, there have been no formal efforts to determine if or ensure that the larger CDC workforce is prepared for an emergency. After all, thousands of people make up CDC’s workforce in Metro Atlanta, throughout the United States, and beyond.

    The public relies upon those thousands of people to keep the life-saving, preventative work of CDC going 24/7. When the CDC workforce has their personal preparedness plans in place, they should be more willing and better able to work on behalf of CDC during a local emergency. Research has shown that individuals are more likely to respond to an event if they perceive that their family is prepared to function in their absence during an emergency*. Also, the National Health Security Strategy describes personal preparedness in its first strategic objective as a means to build community resilience.

    Local Partnerships for the CDC

    Ready CDC intends to move the dial by using its own workforce to understand behaviors associated with preparedness, including barriers to change. This is the most intriguing aspect of Ready CDC for the local community preparedness leaders involved. Most community-level preparedness education is currently conducted at the awareness level. Classes are taught and headcounts are taken, but beyond that, there is no feedback or follow-up to determine if their efforts are leading to desired behavior changes. Ready CDC is currently measuring and studying the Ready CDC intervention and that has local community preparedness leaders around metro Atlanta very interested in its outcomes.

    IMG_1072_smWhile CDC has subject matter experts on many health-related topics, CDC looked to preparedness experts in and around the Metro Atlanta community to help make Ready CDC a locally-sustainable intervention. After all, the best interventions are active collaborations with community partners**. Key community partners from the American Red Cross; Atlanta-Fulton County, DeKalb County, and Gwinnett County Emergency Management Agencies; and the Georgia Emergency Management Agency played ongoing and significant roles in developing the program content, structure, and sustainability needed for CDC’s Metro Atlanta workforce. CDC gets the benefit of their time and expertise while partners have the satisfaction of knowing their efforts are making a difference in and contributing to the resilience of their communities. Also, because of these great partnerships, one lucky class participant wins a family disaster kit courtesy of The Home Depot and Georgia Emergency Management Agency.

    Ready CDC is currently available to the CDC workforce in and around Metro Atlanta; however, efforts are underway to ensure that the broader CDC workforce is reached in 2015. For more information about Ready CDC, please email ready@cdc.gov.

    Are YOU Ready?

    Get ready at First Aid Mart - see our National Preparedness Month Page for Tips, Trick, Lists, Ideas and Supplies!

  • The Ready Campaign

    The Ready Campaign established four universal building blocks of emergency preparedness:
    1. Be informed,
    2. Make a Plan,
    3. Build a Kit and
    4. Get Involved.
    America’s PrepareAthon! builds on this foundation by encouraging millions of Americans to focus on a simple, specific activity that will increase preparedness.
    America’s PrepareAthon! is a national community-based campaign for action that focuses on increasing emergency preparedness through hazard-specific drills, group discussions and exercises. During National Preparedness Month (NPM) in September individuals and communities are encouraged to take action by planning a National PrepareAthon! Day
    on or around September 30.
    For more information on NPM, visit www.ready.gov/september Be-Take-Action-To-Prepare

    Disaster, Survival, Preparation

    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
    Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, you should Check your Emergency Supplies, too:

    • Count your stock... is it enough?
    • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    • Keep cash on hand
    • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    • Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
  • National Preparedness Month - Getting Prepared at Any Age

    Getting Prepared at Any Age

    During National Preparedness Month, Remember that Preparedness - from the Boy Scout Motto to the National Campaign - starts at any age, it is a conscious plan and also a way of being... prepare your kids young, Visit Ready.gov/Kids & have Children's Preparedness Items at Home.

    Hutchinson, Kan., Sep. 9, 2013 -- This two year old, accompanied by his parents, looks over FEMA preparedness material at the Kansas State Fair. FEMA had a informational booth set up at the state fair for Kansas State Preparedness Day. Steve Zumwalt/FEMA Hutchinson, Kan., Sep. 9, 2013 -- This two year old, accompanied by his parents, looks over FEMA preparedness material at the Kansas State Fair. FEMA had a informational booth set up at the state fair for Kansas State Preparedness Day. Steve Zumwalt/FEMA
  • Disaster Preparedness: The Return Home

    No matter how severe a natural disaster, once you have made it through the event and the immediate aftermath, inevitably it will be time to return home. While the worst case scenario may be no ‘home’ to return to, chances are there will be at least some remnants to go back to. On top of the emotional stress that seeing the damage to your home can cause, there are also physical dangers to be aware of as well. The Center for Disease Control has an article to help you learn about these risks, and how to deal with them.

    Source: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/returnhome.asp

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