Pet First Aid

  • H2O2 and your Pet

    Pet First Aid is always a topic we like to share information about - while it is often overlooked in favor of fun and cute pet stories, it is very important to any family with a furry friend - and especially at the Holidays.

    Today, we'd like to share some information about Hydrogen Peroxide and your Pet. We've shared a bit before about how important this is:

    5 Pet First Aid Tricks

    Dog Vomit

    How to respond if your pet has a medical emergency

    Here's some new and helpful information... according to Dr. Sandeman, Home & Garden, Quad-City Times, Hydrogen peroxide is good first aid for pets.

    Hydrogen PeroxideWhile our pets can enjoy the holidays as we do, the season does expose them to things that may pose a risk that they wouldn’t see or touch any other time of the year. And no, we aren’t talking about Aunt Cybil’s sauerkraut dip.

    Products from batteries to chocolate crinkles can cause some type of harm when eaten by our dogs. Prepared owners will have their veterinarian’s or poison control hotline’s number handy along with a fresh bottle of hydrogen peroxide.

    Many of the foods that can be toxic to our pets — grapes, chocolate, products containing the artificial sweetener xylitol — are best handled by giving your pet hydrogen peroxide within a short time of ingestion to cause them to vomit. Even some chemicals such as mouse or rat poison may be initially treated by forcing the patient to throw up any product remaining in their stomach by giving them hydrogen peroxide orally.

    But, not every exposure to a potentially dangerous substance should be addressed with vomit-inducing hydrogen peroxide. In fact, vomiting at the wrong time can lead to further damage.

    And as a general rule, anything that can be irritating or corrosive going down is going to be irritating or corrosive coming back up.

    Batteries, household cleaners such as toilet bowl cleaners and detergents all fall into this category. Especially dangerous to pets and children are laundry detergent pods that seem like the perfect plaything to the unsuspecting, but can serious harm when swallowed.

    Additionally, hydrogen peroxide doesn’t do a good job making cats throw up.

    So, before you do anything, call your veterinarian or emergency clinic before administering any treatment to make sure you are using it correctly and for the right dosage.

    Learn more »

    Pet Safety & Holiday Happiness

  • Preparing Your Pets for Shelter

    We've talked about it before, and we'll talk about it again... you need to prepare ahead of time for pets in emergency situations.

    When you prepare for disasters, be sure to make arrangements for your pets too! In the event that you have to evacuate to a public shelter, keep in mind that for health reasons, some facilities cannot accept pets, so it’s important to prepare them for an alternative shelter. However, service animals are allowed in general population shelters.

    The Ready Campaign offers the following tips when seeking a pet shelter:
    • Call your local emergency management office, animal shelter, or animal control office to get advice and information; and
    • If you’re unable to return to your home right way, you may need to board your pet. Find out the location of boarding facilities and research some outside of your area in case local facilities are closed.
    Once you’ve found an alternative shelter, follow these tips to keep your pet safe while they are away from you:
    • Make sure microchips and identification tags are up-to-date and securely fastened to your pet’s collar. If possible, attach the address and phone number of your evacuation site;
    • Take a current photo with your pet for identification purposes; and
    • Pack a “pet survival kit

    Disaster Supplies for Pets Disaster Emergency Kits for Dogs and Cats + Survival Food Disaster Supplies for Pets
    Disaster Emergency Kits for Dogs and Cats + Survival Food
  • “Ready, Pet, Go!” Preparedness Calendar

    ready-petWe recently talked about PetParedness at the White House... now the American Public Health Association (APHA) recently released an exciting new resource to help prepare your family, school, or office for emergencies. Their 2016 “Ready, Pet, Go!” Get Ready calendar features images of animals sharing important safety tips you can follow throughout the year, including:

    • If you live in an area at risk for hurricanes, know your community’s hurricane warning system. Find your evacuation routes and have supplies packed;
    • If you have to go outside during a winter storm, bundle up. Wear mittens and a hat to stay warm. Limit your time outdoors; and
    • Know where to take shelter during a disaster, whether you’re at home, work, school, or in transit.

    Images used in the calendar feature winners from APHA’s recent photo contest held during National Preparedness Month. This calendar can be a great addition to your bulletin board, office space, or refrigerator. Download and print your copy today!

    Pet First Aid & Pet Emergency and Survival Supplies come in many varieties! Pet First Aid & Pet Emergency and Survival Supplies come in many varieties!
  • Sheltered Pets

    Pets-tWhen you prepare for disasters, be sure to make arrangements for pets too! In the event that you have to evacuate to a public shelter, keep in mind that for health reasons, some facilities cannot accept pets; therefore it’s important to properly prepare them for alternative shelter. Service animals, however, are allowed in general population shelters.

    Pet First Aid & Pet Emergency and Survival Supplies come in many varieties! Pet First Aid & Pet Emergency and Survival Supplies come in many varieties!

    The Ready campaign offers the following tips when seeking pet shelter:

    • Call your local emergency management office, animal shelter, or animal control office to get advice and information; and
    • If you’re unable to return to your home right way, you may need to board your pet. Find out where boarding facilities are located and research some that are outside of your area in case local facilities are closed.

    Once you’ve found an alternative shelter, follow these tips to keep your pet safe while they are away from you:

    • Make sure identification tags are up-to-date and securely fastened to your pet’s collar. If possible, attached the address and/or phone number of your evacuation site;
    • Take a current photo of your pet for identification purposes; and
    • Pack a “pet survival kit” that can easily be deployed if a disaster hits. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has a checklist of emergency supplies to include in the kit.

    For more information about pet preparedness, check this Ready resource guide, and these excellent articles:

  • Pet First Aid Month

    Did you know that April is Pet First Aid Awareness Month?

    Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits

    It is! And it makes sense... with the inset of Spring, pet parents are heading outside with their furry friends, indoor pets are finding new adventures, bugs to chase, newborn critters to torture and more. Mishaps happen. Know what to do and be prepared to care for your your four legged family.

    It is critical that pet parents think about their own actions during an emergency. Pets react to how we react. If we freak out, so will they. A dog or cat that is already hurt, with rapid respiration, an accelerated heartbeat, or a bleeding wound needs to be calmed to avoid dangerous spikes in blood pressure. Don't shout, focus, stay calm, and get help

    If you can have a second adult accompany you to vet emergency have the person who is not driving ahead to prepare the veterinarian for what is coming (and assure they are open and staffed!) These vital minutes can save heartache.

    Never underestimate the ability of children to stay calm and provide genuine help - involve your kids as they can be a big help and giving them something to do will keep them focused , help them not panic, and allow you to focus on the pet that needs your full attention. Make an emergency plan now, and involve the entire family.The secret to surviving any emergency is simply training and preparation.

    Pet first aid is not a substitute for proper veterinary care. These are measures that can keep a bad situation from getting worse if you cannot get to a vet right away. After administering any type of first aid, always see your veterinarian for follow up care.

    image of pet emergency kit and contents Pet Emergency Kits include special needs for Furry Friends in a Disaster.
  • Winter Tip: Bring your furry friends inside!

    A fur coat is nice, but won't be enough to keep your four-legged family members safe... bring them inside.

    Image 16

    Being prepared for an emergency means thinking about the needs of all the members of your family - including pets.

    If you are like millions of animal owners nationwide, your pet is an important member of your household. Unfortunately, animals are also affected by disaster.

    Take a few minutes to check out the information on ready.gov specifically addressing tips and tools for pet owners.

    The likelihood that you and your animals will survive an emergency such as a fire or flood, tornado or terrorist attack depends largely on emergency planning done today. Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as assembling an animal emergency supply kit and developing a pet care buddy system, are the same for any emergency. Whether you decide to stay put in an emergency or evacuate to a safer location, you will need to make plans in advance for your pets. Keep in mind that what's best for you is typically what's best for your animals.

    Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits

    If you evacuate your home, DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND! Pets most likely cannot survive on their own and if by some remote chance they do, you may not be able to find them when you return.

    If you are going to a public shelter, it is important to understand that animals may not be allowed inside. Plan in advance for shelter alternatives that will work for both you and your pets; consider loved ones or friends outside of your immediate area who would be willing to host you and your pets in an emergency.

    Make a back-up emergency plan in case you can't care for your animals yourself. Develop a buddy system with neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to make it on your own for at least three days, maybe longer.

    As you put together supplies for your family’s emergency kit, be sure to think about the well-being of your pets.

    Include food water and medicine to sustain your pets for at least three days.

    Visit ready.gov for a complete list of suggested items, along with recommendations for how to prepare an emergency plan that includes your pets.

    image of pet emergency kit and contents Pet Emergency Kits include special needs for Furry Friends in a Disaster.

    Remember that pet food and medicines can spoil, so check your kit regularly to make sure everything in it is still fresh.

    Use the Pet Owners Brochure and the Pet Instructional Video to help you create an emergency plan and kit for your pet.

    For additional information, please contact the Humane Society of the United States.

  • Pet Safety & Holiday Happiness

    Holidays can be traumatic for furry family members. Travel, guests, schedule disruptions, unusual foods (Stop Uncle Harry! Fluffy doesn't get table scraps!)

    Here are some great ideas for keeps the holidays safe and fund for the four legged family:

    image of pet emergency kit and contents Pet Emergency Kits include special needs for Furry Friends in a Disaster.

    You can help keep pets safe during the holiday season by following the tips below. For other important, timely tips for cold weather protection, traveling with pets and safety issues, as well as behavior guidance, go to www.paw-rescue.org and click the Dog Tips link.

    * Many holiday plants can lead to health problems in dogs and cats. Among the plants to keep out of reach are holly, mistletoe, poinsettias and lilies.

    * Snow globes often contain antifreeze, which is poisonous to pets.

    * Pine needles, when ingested, can puncture holes in a pet's intestine. So keep pet areas clear of pine needles.

    * The extra cords and plugs of holiday lights and other fixtures can look like chew toys to pets. Tape down or cover cords to help avoid shocks, burns or other serious injuries. Unplug lights when you are not home.

    * Anchor Christmas trees to the ceiling with a string to keep it from falling on pets.

    Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits

    * Do not let pets drink the holiday tree water. Some may contain fertilizers, and stagnant tree water can harbor bacteria. Check labels for tree water preservatives and artificial snow, and buy only those that are nontoxic. Some folks use screens around trees to block access to electrical cords and gifts.

    Very important: do not put aspirin in the water (some folks do this thinking it will keep the tree or plant more vigorous). If a pet ingests the aspirin-laced water, his health or even life can be at risk.

    * Pets, particularly cats, can be tempted to eat tinsel, which can block the intestines. Hang tinsel high and securely to keep it out of reach of pets.

    * Keep other ornaments out of reach of pets. Ingestion of any ornament, which might look like toys to pets, can result in life-threatening emergencies. Even ornaments made from dried food can lead to ailments. And remember, shards from broken glass ornaments can injure paws, mouths and other parts of the body.

    Pets-t* Put away toys after children open their gifts. Small plastic pieces and rubber balls are common causes of choking and intestinal blockage in dogs. Ingested plastic or cloth toys must often be removed surgically.

    * Avoid toxic decorations. Bubbling lights contain fluid that can be inhaled or ingested, snow sprays and snow flock can cause reactions when inhaled, styrofoam poses a choking hazard, tinsel can cause choking and intestinal obstruction, and water in snow scenes may contain toxic organisms such as Salmonella.

    * Keep candles on high shelves. Use fireplace screens to avoid burns.

    * Hi-tech shooing: A timely product Im not sure Id recommend, but if you have any experience with it, let me know. The StayAway canister from Contech Electronics uses a motion-detection device to sense when a pet approaches some off-limits area (countertop, table-top, candles, fireplace mantel, holiday tree), then activates a burst of compressed air and a one-second warning screech.

    Other low-tech methods: place sticky mats, crunchy aluminum foil or bubblewrap on or around the area ... tie balloons around the area ... put some pennies in empty plastic drink bottles and balance the bottles on the bottom branches of the holiday tree or plant so that theyll noisily tip over if a cat or other pet jumps at or on the tree.

    * Holiday guests and other activity can be very stressful and even frightening to pets. It can also trigger illness and intestinal upset. Make sure pets have a safe place to retreat in your house. And make sure they are wearing current I.D. in case they escape out a door when guests come and go.

    * Reduce stress by keeping feeding and exercise on a regular schedule.

    * Always make time to care for your pets. Some folks get lax about walking their dogs, and a few resort to letting pets out on their own. This puts the animal in danger, while also leading to nuisance complaints and dog bite incidents. Remind pet owners not to take a holiday from responsibly caring for their pets.

    * When pets are stressed by holiday activity or during travel, they may require more water. Dogs typically pant more when they feel stressed. Keep fresh water available for them to drink.

    * Rescue Remedy, a Bach flower essence available in most health food stores, is a natural stress reliever that many folks keep on hand at home and in travel kits. It can often help both people and animals recover from injury, fright, illness, travel fatigue, chocolate ingestion and irritation. Put a few drops in the dog’s water bowl or portable water container. For stressed or injured animals, rub a drop on their ear or put a drop on the towel in their crate or carrier. Flower essences are free of harmful effects and can be used along with conventional medicines. Another safe, nontoxic Rescue Remedy-like product is Animal Emergency Trauma Solution, available from www.greenhopeessences.com, where you can also get Flee Free to combat fleas nontoxically. Other flower essence sources include anaflora.com and perelandra-ltd.com.

    * Do not let guests feed your pets human food. There are many holiday foods, including fatty meats, gravies, poultry skin, bones, chocolate and alcohol, that can cause illnesses from vomiting and diarrhea to highly serious pancreatitis and other toxic reactions. In addition, candy wrappers, aluminum foil pieces and ribbons can choke pets.

    * Keep pets away from gift packages as well as your gift wrapping area. Ingested string, plastic, cloth and even wrapping paper can lead to intestinal blockage and require surgical removal. And pets have been severely injured by scissors and other items left on floors and tables.

    * Keep pets away from the garbage. Use pet-proof containers.

    * If you suspect that your pet has eaten something toxic, call your veterinarian and/or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center's 24-hour emergency hotline at 1-888-4-ANI-HELP.

    * If your pet ingests glass, broken plastic, staples orother small, sharp objects, call your veterinarian.
    In the meantime, you can give your dog supplemental fiber in the form of whole wheat or other high-fiber bread, canned pumpkin or Metamucil, any of which can help bulk up the stools the help the foreigh material pass through the dogs digestive system. Dosages depend on the size of the dog. For Metamusil, try a teaspoon for a small dog, a tablespoon for a big dog. For pumpkin, feed one-quarter to two-thirds of a cup. Some folks recommend feeding the dog cotton balls to help pass the foreign objects, but others in the veterinary field caution against this since cotton balls can compound the problem.

    * By the way, now is a good time to double-check smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors and other safety devices and replace batteries. Safety, of course, is the key reason -- but here's another good reason. When batteries run low, the devices often emit alert or alarm sounds at frequencies that can be painful and frightening to many pets. If you're not home when the alert/alarm sounds, your animals will have to endure that sound until you return, which can be traumatic. So always keep fresh batteries in those devices.

    Pet Gifts

    Related Articles:

    Holiday Stress Reducers (including Greeting Guests, Stress-Busting Strategies, and Travel Stress Savers)
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_HolidayStress.php

    Safety
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_HouseholdSafety.php
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_FoodAndKitchenSafety.php
    http://www.aspca.org/site/FrameSet?style=User&url=http://www.aspca.org/toxicplants/M01947.htm

    Helping Dogs Cope with Visitors to Your Home
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_copewithvisitors.php

    Preventing Escapes
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_HowtoPreventEscapes.php
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_EscapeArtist.php

    Car and Travel Tips
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_CarSafety.php
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_Travel.php

    Petsitters and Boarding Kennels
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_Petsitter.php

    First Aid Kit and Guidance
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_FirstAid.php

    Cotton Ball Remedy for Ingested Glass
    http://www.paw-rescue.org/PAW/PETTIPS/DogTip_CottonBallRemedy.html

    CPR and Mouth-to-Snout Resuscitation
    http://members.aol.com/henryhbk/acpr.html
    http://www.rescuecritters.com/cpr.html

    Animal Hospital Locator
    http://www.healthypet.com/hospital_search.aspx

    Information courtesy of

    Partnership for Animal Welfare, Inc.
    P.O. Box 1074, Greenbelt, MD 20768

    -----

    Robin Tierney
    Volunteer
    Partnership for Animal Welfare
    www.paw-rescue.org

  • Dog Vomit

    In an article for "Dog Fancy Magazine," board-certified veterinary specialist Justine Lee, D.V.M., a diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care and the American Board of Toxicology, provides guidelines for when and when not to induce vomiting if your dog has ingested a potential toxin...

    Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits

    Although Lee advises that you should call your veterinarian or the Animal Poison Control Center before inducing vomiting, these guidelines may be helpful if you find yourself in a situation where that is not possible and you need to decide whether to take action.

    A good pet first aid kit will come with a pet first aid guide covering many issues like this. However Hydrogen Peroxide is used for inducing emesis (vomiting) in pets, and is often not included in all pet first aid kits.

    Do not induce vomiting if your dog ingests the following:

    * Corrosive substances such as batteries, drain cleaners or bleach. They can cause more injury when vomited up the esophagus.

    * Liquid or gelcap medications including Tylenol and Advil, which are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream.

    * Petroleum distillates such as motor oil, gasoline or kerosene which are hydrocarbons and easily inhaled into the lungs during vomiting.

    * Gorilla Glue (a wood glue) which rapidly expands into a solid mass in the stomach.

    * Sharp objects such as needles or razors.

    * Toxins ingested one or two hours previously that will have already moved out of the stomach,

    * Dogs that show signs of poisoning, such as vomiting, drooling, lethargy, twitching, seizures or unconsciousness. Get to the vet immediately!

    * Do not induce vomiting in brachycephalic, or short-nosed breeds such as pugs, bulldogs or Frenchies.

    Do induce vomiting if your dog ingests the following:

    * Antifreeze.

    * A food poison such as chocolate or grapes.

    * Medications other than liquids or gelcaps such as tablets and pills.

    According to Lee, the only safe way to induce vomiting at home is with 3 percent hydrogen peroxide. Dosage is one teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight, with a maximum of three tablespoons for large dogs. Lee adds that if your dog doesn't vomit within 5 minutes you can try redosing, but if that doesn't work get to your veterinarian or emergency clinic immediately.

  • Keeping Your Pets Safe

    You may know that the FDA works to keep foods and drugs safe for you and your family, but you may not realize the agency does much the same for your pets...

    Drug Safety

    In Fiscal Year 2013, FDA received 86,444 reports of adverse drug events from manufacturers, veterinarians, and consumers. Baker explains that while manufacturers are required by law to report adverse drug events, veterinarians and consumers are encouraged to report on a voluntary basis. Instructions for pet owners on reporting can be found at fda.gov.

    CVM’s pharmacovigilance efforts can lead to

    • revisions in product labels,
    • “Dear Doctor” letters to veterinarians warning of potential safety issues,
    • client information sheets informing pet owners of important drug information, and
    • articles in veterinary journals.

    In addition, to get the word out about its pharmacovigilance efforts, FDA reaches out to veterinarians at professional meetings, continuing education courses and conferences. More recently, FDA has begun reaching out to technicians in veterinary practices, too, to encourage them to report issues of concern with veterinary drugs. “We’re suggesting that more vet techs assume the responsibility for adverse event reporting for vets who may be too tied up to do so in the course of a busy day,” Baker says.

    Pet First Aid Kits - Canine, Feline & Equine First Aid Kits and Bags

    Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits

    Kits made especially for your pets. Dog First Aid, Cat First Aid, Horse First Aid ~ You'll find unique items such as leashes, syringes, and eyewash in these pet first aid kits and pet disaster survival kits that have been developed in collaboration with leading veterinarians. These kits serve as a dog first aid kit, cat first aid kit, or may help with many other mammalian pets! See the new deluxe Sporting Dog First Aid kits if your Canine hits the field with you! We're Canine, Feline & Equine First Aid Headquarters.

    Pet First Aid Kits - Emergency Care for your Dog, Cat & even your Horse!

    FDA engages in pharmacovigilance; that is, it monitors reports of adverse drug events (unexpected and sometimes serious side effects) from manufacturers, veterinarians and animal owners. Monitoring this information can result in changes in product labeling to better communicate drug safety information. In addition, the agency maintains a website through which consumers can report safety problems related to pet foods.

    “People value their pets and may not realize that FDA is constantly on the lookout for signs that there is a medication or food on the market that could result in adverse health events,” says John Baker, a veterinarian and director of the Division of Veterinary Product Safety (DVPS) within the agency’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM).

  • Red Cross Pet First Aid App

    Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits Sporting Dog (& Horse and Cat!) First Aid Kits

    We've told you about our favorite Human First Aid App... how about one for your pets?

    Your pet is an important member of your family. Unfortunately, animals are also affected by disaster, and they rely on you for help during emergencies. Did you know the American Red Cross has a Pet First Aid app to help you take care of your four legged loved ones?

    image of pet emergency kit and contents Pet Emergency Kits include special needs for Furry Friends in a Disaster.

    Available on iTunes and Google Play, this mobile resource puts veterinary advice for emergencies in the palm of your hand. With videos and interactive quizzes, understanding pet first aid has never been easier.

    Some features of the app include:

    • Advice on administering medication, behavioral help and how to act in a disaster situation;
    • First aid steps for over 25 common pet situations;
    • An early warning sign checker for preventive care; and
    • A location finder for emergency vet hospitals and pet-friendly hotels.

    Include this app as part of your pet survival kit to be prepared when your pet needs you the most.

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