#flu

  • Groundhog Day Winter Sale!

    Image of punxsutawney phil and big title reading: Long cold winter. Groundhog day sale

    That’s rightGroundhog Day is a this Friday, and until it happens, we know not when Winter 2018 will end.
    It is already bitter cold in many areas, wet and flooding in others, and who-knows-what still lies in store for Americans this cold and blustery season... Are you Winter Ready?

    To help you be Winter Ready, we are offering you an additional 10% off now through Groundhog Day on all these great Winter Items you need! Enter Code “Burrow” in your shopping cart and take an extra 10% off our already deep-discounted prices on these Winter Essentials.

    "Winter, slumbering in the open air, wears on its smiling face a dream... of spring." While Groundhog Day is a lighthearted movie about a fun winter rite, the reality is that - just as in days gone by - Winter is still Deadly and Dangerous Today.

    Groundhog Day is February 2 and has been celebrated since 1887. On Groundhog Day, crowds gather in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, to see if groundhog Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow after emerging from his burrow, thus predicting six more weeks of winter weather. Originally, in many locations where this was observed with less famous groundhogs than Phil, the way it worked was that if the day was cloudy when a groundhog emerged from its burrow on this day, then it would indicate an early Spring; if it was sunny, the groundhog would supposedly see its shadow and retreat back into its burrow, and the winter weather would then persist for six more weeks. Some say that the tradition has its origins in ancient European weather lore, wherein a badger or sacred bear was the prognosticator, as opposed to a groundhog. The custom also has strong similarities to the Pagan festival of Imbolc (the seasonal turning point of the Celtic calendar, which is celebrated on February 2 and also involves weather prognostication).

    Get ready for a long Winter with all the great Winter Safety Needs above and learn more by reading our Winter Safety Articles.

    If you don't "get" the quotes above… you really need to watch the movie Groundhog Day with Bill Murray – always good for a chuckle.


    Use Discount Codes box in your Shopping Cart (Or in the Payment section of the Checkout Page)


    Clever Itty Bitty Teeny Tiny Fine Print

    Available Online or Toll Free – This sale ends at Midnight on Groundhog Day! (2/2/18) While this is a Winter Sale, and applies to all the recommended Winter Items above, there are oh-so-many other items we offer that apply to Winter Readiness (for instance, you can’t be ready for Winter Exigencies without a First Aid Kit…) so we are making this discount available site-wide on all our products, except Laerdal, Simulaids, and Oxygen Items!
    Offer cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Offer cannot be applied to completed orders. While supplies last, offer subject to substitution or change without notice, call with questions or for further details.

  • Allergy & Flu News

    Vaccine Strategy Induces Antibodies that Can Target Multiple Influenza Viruses...

    Allergy-InstituteScientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. The discovery will help guide development of a universal influenza vaccine, according to investigators. The findings appear in the July 21st online edition of Cell. Learn more & also read: Allergy Treatment & Cough? Cold? Flu? Infection? Pandemic?

    X-ray crystal structure image of one of the newly-identified antibodies X-ray crystal structure image of one of the newly-identified antibodies
  • Achoo

    Cold & Flu Season - Snot fun.

    Are you ready for the sniffles, fevers, coughs and aches of the season?

    Time to review the basics again.

    Cough? Cold? Flu? Infection? Pandemic?

    Foods that help Fight the Flu

    Flu Fighters

    The CDC says:

    You can help reduce your risk of getting a cold:

    • Wash your hands often with soap and water
      Wash them for 20 seconds, and help young children do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Viruses that cause colds can live on your hands, and regular handwashing can help protect you from getting sick.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
      Viruses that cause colds can enter your body this way and make you sick.
    • Stay away from people who are sick
      Sick people can spread viruses that cause the common cold through close contact with others.
    Help reduce your risk of getting a cold by washing hands often with soap and water.

    If you have a cold, you should follow these tips to prevent spreading it to other people:

    • Stay at home while you are sick
    • Avoid close contact with others, such as hugging, kissing, or shaking hands
    • Move away from people before coughing or sneezing
    • Cough and sneeze into a tissue then throw it away, or cough and sneeze into your upper shirt sleeve, completely covering your mouth and nose
    • Wash your hands after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose
    • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and objects such as toys and doorknobs

    There is no vaccine to protect you against the common cold.

    How to Feel Better

    cough-coldThere is no cure for a cold. To feel better, you should get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. Over-the-counter medicines may help ease symptoms but will not make your cold go away any faster. Always read the label and use medications as directed. Talk to your doctor before giving your child nonprescription cold medicines, since some medicines contain ingredients that are not recommended for children. Learn more about symptom relief.

    Antibiotics will not help you recover from a cold. They do not work against viruses, and they may make it harder for your body to fight future bacterial infections if you take them unnecessarily. Learn more about when antibiotics work.

    When to See a Doctor

    You should call your doctor if you or your child has one or more of these conditions:

    • a temperature higher than 100.4° F
    • symptoms that last more than 10 days
    • symptoms that are severe or unusual

    If your child is younger than 3 months of age and has a fever, you should always call your doctor right away. Your doctor can determine if you or your child has a cold and can recommend therapy to help with symptoms.

  • Cold Enough to Catch a Cold

    cough-coldHere we are, deep into Cold & Flu Season, and thus far everyone has seemed to do a pretty good job of avoiding any serious ailments. Now BAM! The temperatures drop and it's wet outside.

    Are you ready to stay well?

    Here are some great articles about avoiding, treating, and minimizing the spread of Wintertime Colds, Coughs, and Flu:

    ... Cough? Cold? Flu? Infection? Pandemic?

    ... Cough, Cold, Runny Nose

    ... Flu Time

    ... Flu Fighters

    ... Spotting the Cold or Flu

    ... Foods that help Fight the Flu

    ... The Flu and YOU!

  • Fall into Autumn Safety

    Fall is here... have you shifted from "Summer Mode" and started to thing about the different safety and preparedness needs of shorter days and solder, wetter weather? Remember, too, as you start baking and enjoying fires at home, burn safety comes into play...

    Be Safe and Enjoy this beautiful Season...Fall-Color

  • Be Careful: Flu Season is NOT over yet

    The 2014-2015 Flu Season is not over yet - Flu activity is still high across most of the country with flu illnesses, hospitalizations and even deaths elevated.

    This current Flu season will probably continue for several more weeks.

    Deluxe Germ Guard Personal Protection Pack w/ N95 Mask This 22-piece pack contains twice the supplies of the RC-650, including two (2) N95 masks. (12) Antimicrobial Cleansing Wipes .... read more American Red Cross Deluxe Germ Guard Personal Protection Pack w/ N95 Mask - This 22-piece pack contains twice the supplies of the RC-650, including two (2) N95 masks. (12) Antimicrobial Cleansing Wipes .... read more

    While this year's flu vaccine is not working as well as usual against some H3N2 viruses, vaccination can still protect some people and reduce hospitalizations and deaths, and will protect against other flu viruses. Knowing about the Flu and taking precautions is your best way to beat the bug.

    Remember that influenza antiviral drugs can treat flu illness. The CDC recommends these drugs be used to treat people who are very sick or who are at high risk of serious flu complications who have flu symptoms. Early antiviral treatment works best.Pandemic-Cough-Cold-Banner

  • Flu Epidemic

    Image of cough and cold medication Cold and Cough Medications in single dose packets, bulk & Wholesale Direct
    Cough & Cold Remedies - Our cough and cold tablets are fast acting Sinus and Nasal Decongestant Tablets, Cold Plus no PSE & Tablets comparable to Tylenol Cold and Cough available in capsules and convenient single dose tablet packets.

    It is the New Year, but flu season has already officially crossed the epidemic threshold, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fifteen children have died across the country from influenza, as the number of states reporting a "high" level of influenza activity jumped from 13 to 22 in one week. The determination follows an earlier warning from the agency that this year's flu season could be a severe one. Keep in mind, however, that epidemic-levels of flu activity in the U.S. are a typical part of the annual flu season. In other words, it's simply too early to determine just how severe this year's epidemic will be. The CDC uses several methods to track and characterize the outbreak. "Right now, all of the CDC's influenza surveillance systems are showing elevated activity," The CDC's flu division said in an e-mailed statement. The influenza season reaches an epidemic level when the proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza reaches a certain threshold: 6.8 percent. According to the CDC's latest available information on the flu season, the percentage is currently at the threshold.

    This Season’s Flu Activity Has Reached the Epidemic Threshold, the CDC Says

    Pandemic-Cough-Cold-Banner

  • Healthy Travel this Winter

    Travelling to Warmer Climes may get you sick... it's true. Think about staying healthy while travelling this Winter no matter where you are headed... Of course we recommend thinking about travel first aid, but the CDC recommends other considerations as well:

    Travel Emergency Kits - Is Yours Packed? Travel Emergency Kits - Is Yours Packed?

    Whether traveling to warmer weather or a snow-filled adventure, make sure the flu is not your travel companion. Get a flu vaccine if you haven’t already done so. It takes 2 weeks for the vaccine to provide protection, so get vaccinated well before your trip to reduce your risk of catching and spreading the flu.

    Wherever you may be going this winter, protecting yourself and others from the flu is important. Here are some useful tips for staying healthy during the winter months.

    Before Your Trip

    Get vaccinated.

    Flu vaccines are the most important tool we have for preventing the flu. If you have not gotten your vaccine already, it's important to get it before you travel. Flu vaccines are available in many places, including doctors' offices, health departments, and pharmacies. You can also use the HealthMap Vaccine Finder if you need help finding places that offer flu vaccine in your area. Getting vaccinated now is the best way to protect yourself against the flu.

    Prepare a travel health kit.

    Remember that prevention can be travel-sized! Include items in your kit that might be helpful if you get sick, such as tissues, pain or fever medicine, soap, and an alcohol-based sanitizer to use in case soap and water are not available. For other health items to consider, see Pack Smart.

    Traveling outside the United States this winter?

    • Learn about health information for your destination.
    • Before you travel, see a doctor familiar with travel medicine to get any vaccines, medicines, and information you need to stay healthy.
    • Talk to your doctor if you are at high risk for flu complications. Depending on your situation, your doctor may advise you to take antiviral medications with you when you travel, especially if appropriate medical care is not available at your destination.
    • Know what to do if you become sick or injured on your trip.
    • Visiting an area where there is a risk of malaria? If so, then seek medical care right away if you have a fever. The first symptoms of malaria usually include fever and chills, similar to the symptoms of the flu. However, if malaria is left untreated, the disease can quickly become serious and even life threatening.

    Travel only when you feel well.

    If you have the flu, take antiviral medications if your doctor prescribes them. Prompt treatment with antivirals is especially important for people at high risk of serious complications or people who are very sick with flu. These drugs can make your flu illness shorter, milder, and reduce the chance of flu complications.

    During Your Trip

    Take these steps to protect your health and the health of others:

    Here are some simple things you can do to take care of yourself and keep others well:

    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Remember to travel only when you feel well. (See above.)
    • Cover your coughs or sneezes with a tissue. No tissue? Then cough or sneeze into your sleeve, not your hands.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based sanitizer.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
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  • Flu Season is here.

    Flu season in the U.S. has a peak infection transmission time (January-February) generally... Now is the time to get your shot if you haven't already... There are some great Flu references and information in this post that will help you find the Flu shot administrator nearest to you ... There is still time to get the shot and be protected from the Flu this year!

    Flu season has begun! Are you protected? The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by various flu viruses that spread when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. About 5 to 20 percent of people in the United States get influenza each year. Flu related complications include pneumonia and dehydration, which can last one to two weeks. In some cases, the flu can also lead to death.

    Deluxe Germ Guard Personal Protection Pack w/ N95 Mask This 22-piece pack contains twice the supplies of the RC-650, including two (2) N95 masks. (12) Antimicrobial Cleansing Wipes .... read more American Red Cross Deluxe Germ Guard Personal Protection Pack w/ N95 Mask
    This 22-piece pack contains twice the supplies of the RC-650, including two (2) N95 masks. (12) Antimicrobial Cleansing Wipes ....
    read more

    Are you protected? The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by various flu viruses that spread when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. About 5 to 20 percent of people in the United States get influenza each year. Flu related complications include pneumonia and dehydration, which can last one to two weeks. In some cases, the flu can also lead to death.
    If you get sick with flu symptoms, stay away from others as much as possible to keep from infecting them. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends staying home at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or necessities. While vaccination remains the best line of defense against flu, there are simple everyday preventive actions you can take to help fight the spread of germs such as washing your hands frequently and covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze.

    If you get sick with flu symptoms, stay away from others as much as possible to keep from infecting them. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends staying home at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or necessities.

    While vaccination remains the best line of defense against flu, there are simple everyday preventive actions you can take to help fight the spread of germs such as washing your hands frequently and covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze.

    GETTING THE SHOT   EVERYONE who needs a Flu Vaccination can easily find a business on the internet that provides/administers it + prices by entering your zip code at this website …see official website here: http://vaccine.healthmap.org/

    (Shot availability is usually October-February, and Flu virus infection peaks in January).

    IMPORTANCE Each year 5%-20% of U.S. residence contract the Flu, there can be complications and ~200,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000-49,000 individuals die as a result every year.  Spread to others occurs 1 day before symptoms up to 7 days after you are sick.

    Pandemic-Cough-Cold-BannerPREVENTION OF FLU EVERYONE should understand how to avoid catching and spreading the flu, here’s the basics:

    • Know your health status and environment and whether there are high risks associated with you contracting the Flu.
    • Get the FLU shot annually (and as early as possible) if you are 6 months or older and meet a few other conditions
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub, (and as of 2009) both in the hospital and home individuals using face masks demonstrated a decrease the transmission of Flu to others.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread by cough, sneeze, talking, and less commonly by touching others & objects with contaminated hands.
    • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Health habits: Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food.
    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your arm when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash immediately after you use it, and be conscious of what you touch.
    • If you are sick with flu-like illness, take all FLU medications prescribed to you by your doctor (until they are all gone), stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone without the use of fever-reducing medicine (i.e. usually 7 days after your first symptoms).
    • (Personal Preference) After any viral or bacterial sickness subsides, I like to do a little cleaning e.g. all tissues, dishes, trash, bedding, door-knobs, bathroom, appliance arms and phones get wiped down…(This may be OCD in some cases, but may help decontaminate your home especially with germs that are transmitted through contact).

    OFFICIAL PREVENTION INFORMATION is here:

    CDC’s 3 ACTIONS TO FIGHT THE FLU:       http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/preventing.htm

    ALSO SEE official FLU.GOV website here:   http://www.flu.gov/prevention-vaccination/prevention/index.html

    BUSINESSES FLU printable materials and toolkits from the CDC are here:http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/print.htm

    EDUCATION Individuals reading this information should briefly understand the difference between FLU and Cold viruses, and why antibiotics are generally not used…see CDC link here:

    TYPES OF FLU VACCINATIONS Individuals who desire to understand the differences between different FLU types and shots can find answers at… these CDC websites here:

    PARENTS & CARE PROVIDERS If you are caring for someone who is sick, the following CDC document provides some useful guidelines:

    INFORMATIVE RESOURCES  Learn about specific seasonal FLU as you wish here SEASONAL FLU:   http://www.flu.gov/about_the_flu/seasonal/

    WHO SHOULD BE VACCINATEDhttp://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/whoshouldvax.htm

    TRAVEL CHECKLIST check travel vaccine recommendations here (half way down under (“Your Health” section):  http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/go/checklist.html

    RESEARCHERS Individuals and researchers who are serious about publications, statistics, and other disease info can utilize:

    The CDC Stacks search engine here: http://stacks.cdc.gov/gsearch  OR

    Wonder HERE: http://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/prevguid/search_prevguid.html

    http://wonder.cdc.gov/

    Other important websites to bookmark may include:

    Vaccinations http://www.vaccines.gov/

    ID Isolation Protocol http://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/prevguid/p0000419/p0000419.asp

    Read more:

  • Autumn Health and Safety

    While the media is full of Ebola updates, other concerns should not be forgotten this Fall. Enterovirus, Rabbit Fever and other concerns are actually more likely to affect Americans directly than Ebola. Of course, too, we are at the beginning of cough, could and flu season - so it's time to get ready for that.

    Have a safe and healthy Halloween.

    Make Halloween festivities fun, safe, and healthy for trick-or-treaters and party guests.

    Read these tips and articles:

    ake steps to prevent the flu.

    The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year in the fall. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Wash your hands often. Stay home if you get sick.

    • Flu Season Is Around the Corner
    • Seasonal Flu Vaccination
    • Take 3 Actions to Fight the Flu -

      CDC urges you to take the following actions to protect yourself and others from influenza (the flu): 

      Step One

      Take time to get a flu vaccine.

      Take time to get a flu vaccine like this young boy from an older female nurse.

      • CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.
      • While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the three or four viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See upcoming season’s Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)
      • Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations and deaths.
      • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine as soon as the current season's vaccines are available.
      • Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness.
      • People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older.
      • Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to high risk people.
      • Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for them should be vaccinated instead.
      Step Two

      Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

      Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs like this mother teaching her young child to wash hands.

      • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
      • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
      • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
      • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
      • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
      • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
      • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.
      • See Everyday Preventive Actions[257 KB, 2 pages] and Nonpharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs) for more information about actions – apart from getting vaccinated and taking medicine – that people and communities can take to help slow the spread of illnesses like influenza (flu).
      Step 3

      Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

      Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them like this older woman listening to her doctor.

      • If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can treat your illness.
      • Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter.
      • Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For people with high risk factors[702 KB, 2 pages], treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.
      • Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick, but starting them later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high-risk health or is very sick from the flu. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking this drug.
      • Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a fever.

    Get smart about antibiotics.

    Antibiotics can cure bacterial infections, but not viral infections. The common cold and the flu are viral infections, so avoid using antibiotics if you have one of these. Using antibiotics when they are not needed causes some bacteria to become resistant to the antibiotic, and therefore stronger and harder to kill. See your doctor or nurse to find out if your illness is bacterial or viral.

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