first aid kit

  • 13% OFF Friday the 13th Sale!

    13% OFF! Friday the 13th Sale

    Kinda scary, isn't it? Not really... at least not once you get LUCKY and save 13% of your shopping cart total on our already deep-discounted First Aid, CPR, Safety, and Disaster Supplies! Get 13% OFF Sitewide* Code valid now - so get a head start! (Code: Penny)
    *HINT: Double down on Lucky 13. Take 13% OFF most Sale Items too!

    Best Sellers!

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    Clever Itty Bitty Teeny Tiny Fine Print

    Offer expires midnight 09/13/2019 – Available Online at FirstAidMart.com or Toll Free 1.888.622.6324 - Offer cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Offer cannot be applied to completed orders. While supplies last, offer subject to substitution or change without notice, call with questions or for further details.

    Note: "Penny" code excludes Oxygen Products, Laerdal, Simulaids, Free Shipping Products, Fundraising First Aid kits, & a few already WAY below cost clearance items.

  • Lucky 13 Percent OFF Friday the 13th Sale

    13% OFF! Friday the 13th Sale

    Kinda scary, isn't it? Not really… at least not once you get LUCKY and save 13% of your shopping cart total on our already deep-discounted First Aid, CPR, Safety, and Disaster Supplies! Get 13% OFF Sitewide* Code valid now – so get a head start! (Code: F13)
    *HINT: Double down on Lucky 13. Take 13% OFF most Sale Items too!

    Best Sellers!

    Trending Now...


    Clever Itty Bitty Teeny Tiny Fine Print

    Offer expires 10/13/17. Available Online at FirstAidMart.com or Toll Free 1.888.622.6324 - Offer cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Offer cannot be applied to completed orders. While supplies last, offer subject to substitution or change without notice, call with questions or for further details. *Sitewide offer excludes Laerdal, Simulaids and Oxygen products.

  • Have you Expired?

    ANSI-First-Aid-KitHaving a First Aid Kit is a "no brainer" right? (at home, work, in your car, for sports, camping - Everywhere!)... Good, if you are one of our readers, you probably get that point. But - when is the last time you checked the content?

    First Aid kits get used... replace those bandages, gauzes, tapes and tools when they go missing. Consider too, that medications expire. Check the dates on the oral and topical medicaments in your first aid kit - they're probably due for a refresher!

    First Aid Refills for restocking your kit are readily available in the same small, convenient sizes as came in the original kit:

    There are even First Aid Kit resupply packs.

    Too lazy? Or perhaps your First Aid Kit is so worked-over it just make sense (both financially and time-wise) to get a new one? No problem... there's a kit for every need at a great price!

  • First aid kit is a great gift for any farm

    Safety is a 24/7 challenge for farmers, ranchers and farm families. On the farm, you must be prepared to handle an injury until emergency help arrives.

    First Aid Kits Keep a fully stocked First Aid Kit nearby

    First aid kits are our business. Since 1993 we've been focused on providing "quality, comprehensive first aid kits at a fair price"

    As experts we thought we'd pass along a few tips we've learned along the way on what you should look for when buying a first aid kit regardless of brand.

    Look for variety of components
    Many first aid kits attempt to sell a kit comprised of a box of adhesive bandages and a few tablets. How many different type of injuries will this kit treat? Not very many! Don't be fooled by quantity of components, look for variety of components! The idea is to include components for real life emergencies, not what might let the kit sell for a few dollars less.

    Make sure all basic categories are covered
    Any first aid kit should contain at least something from the following groups: Antiseptics (something to kill germs to prevent infection), Injury treatment (items to deal with injuries such as butterlfy closures and cold compresses), Bandages (a variety of bandages to dress and cover a variety of wounds), Instruments (tweezers, barrier gloves), and Medicines (analgesics at a minimum).

    Kit organization
    First aid kits are only used in a time of need. If you, or someone you are near, are injured and need assistance a first aid kit won't do any good if you can't find what you need. Look for a kit that has its contents nicely organized so you can locate supplies readily.

    Quality components
    Adhesive bandages that don't stick, poorly shaped bandages, component packaging that falls apart, a case that doesn't stand up... a poor quality kit is the last thing you need in dealing with an emergency.

    Information
    A first aid kit does no good if you don't know what to do with it. Frankly, most first aid kits include some kind of guide, but their usefulness can vary widely. Make sure the first aid guide in your kit is from a credible source, contains the latest medical advice, and make sure it its laid out in a way that can be understood when under stress.

    We encourage you to make sure that your family is fully prepared for emergencies. Evaluate your household, keep a first aid kit everywhere there is likely to be an emergency... around the house, in each car, in backpacks, and in your RV or boat. We have developed the broadest array of First Aid kits available to help you be prepared — something for every application or use, and all developed for real life emergencies.

  • What goes into a do-it-yourself first-aid kit?

    We found this a bit chauvinistic, but still a good reply from the "Ask Pat" column in the Sioux City Journal... 

    Most "real men" think of a bottle of peroxide and a box of Band-Aids as a first-aid kit. Since the injured person himself or his family or immediate neighbors will likely be the first responders to an accident, a comprehensive first-aid kit should be in the tool shed with him.

    No one ever expects to get hurt. This only happens to other people who are careless and not experienced with power or hand tools. Well, this just isn't so and freak injuries can happen to anyone at anytime.

    For example, at a safety class, I heard one experienced woodworker tell how he cut off the tip of his thumb. Instead of using a pusher block on a table saw, he was pushing the wood with his hand. From the vibrations of cutting a lot, his hand was somewhat numb. He did not even realize he had cut his thumb off until he tried to push another piece and he could not because the thumb was gone.

    The first safety step is to always take a cell phone along to the tool shed so you can call for help. Have your own house, your neighbor's and 911 programmed in for one-button dialing. Memorize where the buttons are so you can do it even in the dark because the accident may temporarily blind you.

    For the greatest safety, install a large alarm bell on the outside of the tool shed. Wire it to a switch with a long rope all the way to the floor. Tie loops along the length of the rope so it is easy to pull even with injured hands or your teeth if you have too. The bell should be loud enough so your neighbors can also hear it and make sure they know what it means.

    First Aid Kits & First Aid Bags. American Red Cross Kits, Home, Car & Auto First Aid Kits, Pet Emergency First Aid Kits, Sports and Outdoor First Aid-available in Soft Pack and Mini Pack. See our "Special" Kits; Spanish Language Kits & First Aid Kits without Medications First Aid Kits & First Aid Bags. American Red Cross Kits, Home, Car & Auto First Aid Kits, Pet Emergency First Aid Kits, Sports and Outdoor First Aid-available in Soft Pack and Mini Pack. See our "Special" Kits; Spanish Language Kits & First Aid Kits without Medications

    Most of the typical injuries a do-it-yourselfer sustains are minor splinters, cuts and scratches. Severe bleeding is usually not an issue with these types of injuries, so the main concern is cleaning and covering the wound so you can continue working.

    For these types of minor injuries, your first-aid kit should include pointed tweezers, gauze pads, medical tape, a small sharp knife and Band-Aids. Include a bottle of sterilizer water, antiseptic soap and alcohol wipes.

    For more serious cuts, particularly ones that cut an artery, most of the same items can be used, but you will need immediate medical attention. You can identify an arterial cut because the blood will gush out with each heart beat. Include a strong wooden dowel rod and some larger cloth bandages in case you have to make a tourniquet.

    Include a small bolt cutter to cut off the end of an object that impales the skin. This allows a bandage to be applied immediately. For debris in the eyes, include an eyewash kit (cup and solution) and cotton swaps. Adhesive eye patches are also good to cover the eye so you tend to blink less often and reduce irritation and possible additional abrasion.

    We also would like to remind you of these guidelines:

    First aid kits are our business. Since 1993 we've been focused on providing "quality, comprehensive first aid kits at a fair price"

    As experts we thought we'd pass along a few tips we've learned along the way on what you should look for when buying a first aid kit regardless of brand.

    Look for variety of components
    Many first aid kits attempt to sell a kit comprised of a box of adhesive bandages and a few tablets. How many different type of injuries will this kit treat? Not very many! Don't be fooled by quantity of components, look for variety of components! The idea is to include components for real life emergencies, not what might let the kit sell for a few dollars less.

    Make sure all basic categories are covered
    Any first aid kit should contain at least something from the following groups: Antiseptics (something to kill germs to prevent infection), Injury treatment (items to deal with injuries such as butterlfy closures and cold compresses), Bandages (a variety of bandages to dress and cover a variety of wounds), Instruments (tweezers, barrier gloves), and Medicines (analgesics at a minimum).

    Kit organization
    First aid kits are only used in a time of need. If you, or someone you are near, are injured and need assistance a first aid kit won't do any good if you can't find what you need. Look for a kit that has its contents nicely organized so you can locate supplies readily.

    Quality components
    Adhesive bandages that don't stick, poorly shaped bandages, component packaging that falls apart, a case that doesn't stand up... a poor quality kit is the last thing you need in dealing with an emergency.

    Information
    A first aid kit does no good if you don't know what to do with it. Frankly, most first aid kits include some kind of guide, but their usefulness can vary widely. Make sure the first aid guide in your kit is from a credible source, contains the latest medical advice, and make sure it its laid out in a way that can be understood when under stress.

  • A functional first aid kit requires a few essential items

    Outdoors Ten important items for outdoor first aid kit
    When you’re outdoors and away from civilization, a minor injury could become a problem. Small cuts, abrasions or blisters can be an inconvenience. However, there could be an instance requiring immediate attention. Carrying along some essential items in an equipped first aid kit can save the day or possibly someone’s life.

    Outdoor First Aid Kits come in all levels and sizes.. click to see more. Outdoor First Aid Kits come in all levels and sizes.. click to see more.

    The Boy Scout motto, “Be Prepared,” relates to outdoors men and women having the necessary gear at hand to meet an emergency should one happen. A simple first-aid kit containing the proper items will help in attending to most first-aid requirements when outdoors.

    There are many commercial first aid kits available for a modest price. Some kits offer a wide variety of supplies for minor emergencies afield. There may be some items users will want to add to fit a specific outing.

    “First aid kits can be customized to fit the situation,” said Glenn Wheeler, a licensed EMT and outdoor enthusiast. “Specific items can be added to off-the-shelf kits that go beyond the basic essentials.”

    1. Gloves: A few pairs of latex-free medical gloves are always an essential item. The gloves help protect you and the patient in a medical situation. Emergency gloves prevent contact with cuts and blood. They can be quickly removed and discarded for easy clean-up.

    Also, the gloves may come in handy if having to work on a greasy engine or field dressing game. Most kits usually contain at least a pair, but it is a good idea to throw in a few extras.

    2. Methods to summon help: In today’s world cell phones are common and have service even in some remote areas. Before heading out make certain the battery is fully charged and the phone is operational. Program the phone with emergency numbers for police, forest rangers, conservation officers and a nearby hospital.

    Two-way radios can be used between groups or even some emergency agencies. The Coast Guard and some marinas monitor the emergency marine channel. One issue with radios is the range is limited by terrain.

    3. Fire starters: Matches may seem out of the ordinary for a first-aid kit, but remember this is an outdoor kit. Use a waterproof match holder or plastic zip close bag to store the matches and keep moisture out. There are also fire starter kits that can be used in the place of matches.

    A fire can serve many purposes during an emergency. An injured patient can be kept warm near a fire to help reduce the stress on their body. After dark, the light from the fire can guide rescuers to your position.

    4. Paper and pen: Two other items usually not found in a first-aid kit are a pen and paper. These are used to write down important information about the patient’s injuries. It is a good idea to make notes about the injured person as to any allergies, medical history or other factors related to the injuries.

    “Make notes as to what you have done to the patient,” Wheeler said. “Give this information to the paramedics when they arrive to save time.”

    If you have contacted a hospital write down the instructions they give you relating to needed first aid for the victim. This will also help the EMT’s know what treatment has been given.

    5. Antiseptic: Hand sanitizer and/or antiseptic wipes is an important item for any first aid kid. The hand sanitizer can be used to clean up your hands before and after dealing with an injured person. The antiseptic wipes can be used to clean minor wounds and scratches on the victim. Both of these items are available in small containers or in single use packets.

    6. Basic medications: Simple over-the-counter medications can be used to help relieve pain, fever, swelling and itching. These are not prescription medications but some simple drugs to help the injured person. Individual packets of aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen can help with fever and pain.

    Also, some diphenhydramine (Benadryl) will help relieve itching or an allergic reaction. If a person has a severe allergy, they many want to visit their doctor for en Epi-pen just in case. Some OTC allergy or sinus medication could also be needed for minor symptoms when outdoors.

    Antibiotic ointment, such as Neosporin is handy for cuts, scrapes and blisters.

    7. Adhesive bandages: No first-aid kit would be complete without some Band-Aids. The simple, yet effective self-adhesive bandages are quick and easy to apply. Cuts, burns, insect bites, blisters and other minor contusions can be covered with the strips. Pack in several sizes from small strips to larger pads.

    Gauze pads and rolls can also fall into this category. The pads can be used to clean wounds and placed over cuts to help stop any bleeding. Rolls of gauze can be wrapped around larger wounds or used to immobilize broken bones.

    8. Tape: Usually a small roll of medical tape is included in most commercial first aid kits. However, there may be times when a stronger tape is required. A few feet of duct tape can be unrolled and rolled back onto itself. This takes up little room in the kit and can have many uses in an emergency.

    The duct tape can cover bandages to keep them waterproof. The tape can be torn into strips for holding splints in place or as a splint for fingers.

    9. Medical shears: These are specialized scissors also known as EMT shears. They can cut through just about any material. The scissors may be required to cut away any clothing to expose an injury. Also, the shears are used to cut gauze pads, tape, rope or small limbs to make a splint.

    10. Plastic zip close bags: Small sized zip close plastic bags have an unlimited uses in first aid. They keep the gauze and dressing fresh, dry and clean. The bags can be filled with clean water and a corner cut to irrigate wounds.

    Also, the bags can be labeled for quick identification of items in the first aid kit.

    Read more: Anniston Star - Outdoors Ten important items for outdoor first aid kit

  • The Centers for Disease Control say Check Your First Aid Kit!

    Check Your First Aid Kit

    Have you used any First Aid supplies this season? Make sure you have essential first aid items such as bandages, antibiotic ointment, scissors, etc. Don’t forget to check expiration dates too!

    Check out these great American Red Cross FIrst Aid Kits! Check out these great American Red Cross FIrst Aid Kits!
  • First Aid Kit - Now 125 Years old! An American Invention.

    Obviously we are "Into First Aid"... that is what FirstAidMart.com is all about... but there's more to first aid than just a box of band-aids... it is about thoughtful preparedness, design, ease of access, and knowledge of First Aid Skills, too.

    This week Vanity Fair brought us news of the 125th Anniversary of the First Aid Kit as celebrated by Johnson & Johnson (J&J doesn't just make First Aid Kits - You'll probably recognize their other brands like BAND-AID® Brand Adhesive Bandages, Neosporin, and Tylenol)

    Johnson-and-Johnson-1It all started with a conversation. In the late 1880s, Johnson & Johnson founder Robert Wood Johnson struck up a friendly conversation with the railway surgeon on his train and discovered there was a dire need to establish a better method of treating the injuries of railroad workers on-the-job.

    Johnson-and-Johnson-2By 1888, the businessman had engineered the first-ever First Aid Kit, to solve the problem of personal safety for America's work force. Johnson & Johnson to the rescue!

    Johnson-and-Johnson-3Johnson & Johnson quickly found a new market for their revolutionary product. In 1898, pocket-sized kits were distributed to soldiers in combat during the Spanish-American War. Can you say "handy?"

    Johnson-and-Johnson-4On into the early 20th century, the health-care company was finding new uses and markets for its product all the time! With each new variety came different contents to fit the needs of its market.

    Johnson-and-Johnson-5However, Johnson & Johnson never forgot their roots! Fitting to their original mission, the company began developing kits for the new advances in transportation—cars and airplanes were considered the new frontier! In the 1920s, the Autokit was produced, containing a metal plate for the front of the car that read, "Johnson & Johnson First Aid Equipped." Even famed pilot Charles Lindbergh carried an Aerokit aboard his daring nonstop flight across the Atlantic, in 1927.

    Johnson-and-Johnson-6The 1920s marked a particularly progressive decade, as Johnson & Johnson also introduced the first Band-Aid. Band-Aids were developed by Eugene Dickenson, to assist his wife, who often cut and burned herself while cooking. Many people must have identified with her, because the bandages were an instant hit!

    Band-Aids became so popular that Johnson & Johnson eventually saw the need to diversify and individualize the brand. Creativity flowed, and the products became decorative, with patterns such as stars-and-stripes. The company even addressed the fashionability of the brand and developed a sheer Band-Aid to create the illusion that it's not there!

    To add another dimension to their company mission, Johnson & Johnson established a partnership with Safe Kids Worldwide. Unlike Johnson & Johnson's goal of emergency response, Safe Kids Worldwide focuses on preventative care. The collaboration proved beneficial to both parties.

    As individual Johnson & Johnson products were adapting all the time, First Aid Kits were as well. They began to cover just about every possible user and use!

    Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal at the 125th Anniversary Celebration of the First Aid Kit. Gyllenhaal is the face of Johnson & Johnson's latest collaboration—the Everyday Care campaign, a partnership with Safe Kids Wordlwide to promote first-aid awareness. Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal at the 125th Anniversary Celebration of the First Aid Kit. Gyllenhaal is the face of Johnson & Johnson's latest collaboration—the Everyday Care campaign, a partnership with Safe Kids Wordlwide to promote first-aid awareness.

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