fema

  • 3 Steps to Prepare for Hurricanes

    As we progress into the Hurricane Season, each of us need to take inventory of our supplies, assess our readiness, and plan for safety in a storm.

    According to FEMA director, Craig Fugate, his should begin with three basic steps:

    1. Know your evacuation zone.  Evacuation zones are areas that may be impacted by hurricane flooding. Many communities have designated evacuation zones and routes to get citizens to safety. This information can often be found on the websites of your state, county, or town emergency management offices. If a hurricane threatens your community and local officials say it's time to evacuate, don't wait.
    2. Disaster-Survival-First-Aid-Mart Disaster Kits Food & Water Shelter & Sleeping CERT Gear & Supplies Red Cross Supplies Roadside+Auto Emergency

      Download the FEMA app. With the FEMA smartphone app you’ll have all the information you need to know what to do before, during, and after a hurricane.  You can also receive weather alerts in your area from NOAA’s National Weather Service, find lifesaving safety tips, and have access to disaster resources should you need them. You can download the app from the Apple App store or the Google Play store. The FEMA app is also available in Spanish.

    3. Make a plan and build a kit. When a hurricane hits, communications systems can go out, transportation can be limited, and it could be days before emergency responders are able to reach your community if you need help. Making a plan - and practicing that plan - helps to ensure you and your family are safe and ready for these challenges.  Your plan should include:
    • Family communication plan: Talk with your family members about how you will contact one another in an emergency. Know how you will check in with family members in different locations, how you will care for children or members with access and functional needs, and how your family will get in touch if cell phone, internet, or landlines don’t work.
    • Emergency Supply KitA ‘go kit’ is a bag that contains basic items you and your family may need, during an emergency. Kits should contain non-perishable food, water, and other supplies, such as flashlights, local maps, and a battery-powered radio, to last you and your family for at least 72 hours.
    • Pets: Many local shelters do not permit pets, but laws require them to accept service animals. Know what you will do with your pet if you need to evacuate.

    Hurricane Season just began June 1st and runs through November 30th - Prepare Now!

     

  • FEMA Individual and Community Preparedness Awards

    Apply for FEMA Individual and Community Preparedness Awards...

    That's right - awards from FEMA for doing what your should already be doing!

    Disaster-Survival-Preparedness

    Individual and Community Preparedness Awards highlight innovative local practices and achievements by individuals and organizations that made outstanding contributions toward making their communities safer, better prepared, and more resilient.

    To be considered for this year’s awards, all submissions must be received by March 28, 2016, at 11:59 p.m. EDT, and they must feature program activities between January 1, 2015, and March 28, 2016. Submit applications to citizencorps@fema.dhs.gov.

    Gear up and be Prepared! Gear up and be Prepared!

    Award categories include:
    • Outstanding Citizen Corps Council
    • Community Preparedness Champions
    • Awareness to Action
    • Technological Innovation
    • Outstanding Achievement in Youth Preparedness
    • Preparing the Whole Community
    • Outstanding Inclusive Initiatives in Emergency Management (new category)
    • Outstanding Private Sector Initiatives (new category)
    • Outstanding Community Emergency Response Team Initiatives
    • Outstanding Citizen Corps Partner Program
    • America’s PrepareAthon! in Action (new category)

    Go here to download the application, and to read the application guidance.  

    Visit Ready.Gov for more information

  • National Preparedness Goal

    Yesterday, FEMA and its partners released the Second Edition of the National Preparedness Goal. The National Preparedness Goal describes a vision for preparedness nationwide and identifies the core capabilities necessary to achieve that vision across the five mission areas: Prevention, Protection, Mitigation, Response and Recovery. The goal itself is succinct and remains unchanged:

    “A secure and resilient nation with the capabilities required across the whole community to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk.”

    FEMAThe Second Edition of the National Preparedness Goal represents a refresh from the 2011 version and incorporates critical edits identified through real world events, lessons learned, and continuing implementation of the National Preparedness System. In refreshing the National Preparedness Goal, FEMA and its whole community partners, including individuals, communities, the private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, and all levels of government, focused on assessing the existing core capabilities. Resulting updates to the core capabilities include changes to select titles and definitions and the addition of one new core capability—Fire Management and Suppression.

    Changes made to the core capabilities will be reflected in the ongoing refresh efforts of the National Planning Frameworks and Federal Interagency Operational Plans for each of the mission areas.

    For a copy of the document and related resources, go to: https://www.fema.gov/national-preparedness-goal.

    # # #

    Disaster, Survival, Preparation

    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
    Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!

    Prepare and Endure! Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, too, you should Check your Emergency Supplies:
    Count your stock... is it enough?
    Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    Keep cash on hand
    Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.


    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, you should Check your Emergency Supplies, too:

    • Count your stock... is it enough?
    • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    • Keep cash on hand
    • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    • Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
  • Natural Disasters and Severe Weather

    With National Preparedness Month around the corner, we wanted to share one of our favorite resources with our readers.

    Most often, on thinks of FEMA, Ready.gov, or America's PrepareAthon when thinking "Preparedness" - but what about the CDC?

    The Centers for Disease Control and prevention offer a wealth of free resources on the subject of preparedness... here are a few:

    Collage of Disaster-Related Imagery

    Types of Disasters & Weather Emergencies


  • National Preparedness Month is coming...

    Get ready - plan ahead (that's what it is all about anyway, right?)

    September is National Preparedness Month. This year's theme is: "Don't Wait. Communicate. Make your emergency plan today."

    We'll be sharing a LOT more as we head toward NPM and throughout September as well!

    NPM-2015

    Here's last years info - also read more:

  • FEMA Safe Rooms

    FEMAHaving a FEMA safe room or International Code Council 500 storm shelter in your home or small business can help provide near-absolute protection for your family or employees during extreme weather events such as tornadoes and hurricanes, but safe rooms must be built correctly to ensure occupants are protected from injury or death.

    In the FEMA publication, “Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business,” FEMA provides specifications on how to properly design and build a safe room. These guidelines offered in this publication must be met to be considered a FEMA safe room. This document also outlines how to modify a home or business to add a safe room to an existing space.

    If you have questions about building a safe room, contact the FEMA Safe Room Helpline at saferoom@fema.dhs.gov. You can also check out this list of Frequently Asked Questions.

    In addition to having a safe room, there are other ways to prepare for disasters. America’s PrepareAthon! offers valuable information about severe weather events that may impact your community this season, including tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, wildfires, and floods.

    Disaster, Survival, Preparation

    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
    Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, you should Check your Emergency Supplies, too:

    • Count your stock... is it enough?
    • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    • Keep cash on hand
    • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    • Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!

  • FEMA 101: Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)

    Following a major disaster, first responders will not be able to meet the demand for services generally expected by the public. Factors such as the number of injured, ready-buttoncommunications failures and road blockages will prevent services such as fire
    and medical from responding to an incident at a moment’s notice. To combat this problem, FEMA formed the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program
    to educate civilians and train them how to be emergency managers before full time emergency services can respond. The CERT training course is a major benefit to
    all participants and their communities. Individuals will be better prepared to respond to and cope with the aftermath of a disaster.
    CERT Gear CERT Gear

    CERT is about readiness, people helping people, rescuer safety and doing the greatest good for the greatest number. CERT is a positive and realistic approach to emergency and disaster situations where citizens will be initially on their own. Through training, citizens can manage utilities and put out small fires; treat the three killers by opening airways, controlling bleeding, and treating for shock; provide basic medical aid; search for and rescue survivors safely and organize themselves and spontaneous volunteers to be effective.

    C.E.R.T. Products

  • Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS)

    Emergency Alerts will keep you apprised of emergencies in your area - easy, free and a must for individuals, schools, organizations (like CERT!) and businesses... As we start planning toward National Preparedness Month (When you'll AL be ready already so you can help others get prepared, right?) start doing the little things, like signing up for the free apps and assuring your alerts systems are understood and set.

    What can IPAWS do for you?

    Receiving timely information about weather conditions or other emergency events can make all the difference in knowing when to take action to be safe. FEMA, private industry and other local, state and federal partners are working together to make sure you can receive alerts and warnings quickly through several different technologies no matter where you are.Alerrts

    Organized by FEMA, the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) is the Nation’s alert and warning infrastructure. It provides an effective way to alert and warn the public about emergencies using the Emergency Alert System (EAS), Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, and other public alerting systemsNOAA-Weather-Radio from a single interface.

    For those with access and functional needs, many messages are TTY/TDD compatible and many devices have accessible accommodations. Make sure you will receive critical information as soon as possible so you can take action to be safe.

    Receiving timely information about weather conditions or other emergency events can make all the difference in knowing when to take action to be safe. Local police and fire departments, emergency managers, the National Weather Service (NWS), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and private industry are working together to make sure you can receive alerts and warnings quickly through several different technologies no matter where you are–at home, at school, at work, or in the community.

    For those with access and functional needs, many messages are TTY/TDD compatible and many devices have accessible accommodations. Review this fact sheet to make sure you will receive critical information as soon as possible so you can take action to be safe. Be sure to share this information with your family, friends, and colleagues.Remember to keep extra batteries for your mobile phone or radio in a safe place or consider purchasing other back-up power supplies such as a car, solar-powered, or hand crank charger.

    Using IPAWS, officials can send messages simultaneously through multiple
    pathways, including:

    • EAS: used by alerting authorities to send detailed warnings to broadcast, cable, satellite, and wireline communication pathways;
    • WEA: Free, 90-character emergency text messages sent by local alerting authorities to equipped mobile devices within range of cell towers broadcasting in the affected area. You do not have to sign up for WEA alerts. To find out if your mobile device is capable of receiving WEA alerts, contact your cellular service provider or visit www.ctia.org/WEA; and
    • IPAWS compliant digital road signs, sirens, and other systems.

    Organized by FEMA, the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) is the Nation’s alert and warning infrastructure.
    It provides an effective way to alert and warn the public about emergencies using the Emergency Alert System (EAS), Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, and other public alerting systems from a single interface.
    IPAWS is used to send notifications for three alert categories— Presidential, AMBER, and Imminent Threat.

    A special weather radio receiver is required to receive NWR broadcasts. You can buy these receivers at many retail outlets such as electronics stores, department stores, big box stores, or online. Be sure to look for the Public Alert or NWR logo to ensure the radio meets technical requirements. Models identified as SAME, or Specific Area Message Encoding, receivers allow users to select alerts for specific geographic areas. For information on NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, visit www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr

    CommunicationSolutionsNew

    FOR INDIVIDUALS

    • Confirm your mobile device can receive Wireless Emergency Alerts.
    • Sign up for text and/or email alerts from your local jurisdiction.
    • Consider purchasing a NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.
    • If you do not have a landline, check to see if your jurisdiction has options for VoIP
    • and mobile phones to be connected to ETN systems such as Reverse 911©.
    • Sign up for listservs and alerts for the workplace, schools, houses of worship, or
    • other community organizations you’ll want to hear from in an emergency.
    • Download relevant hazard alerts and warnings apps.
    • Create a list of all the alert systems available to you, and make sure everyone in the
    • household receives the alerts as part of your household communication system.

    FOR ORGANIZATIONS

    • Test internal communication systems to ensure all individuals in the organization
    • can be contacted.
    • Designate individuals to be responsible for distributing alerts from official sources.
    • Consider purchasing a NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.
    • Develop a list of all the alert systems available for your community and your
    • organization as a guide for people in the organization.
    • Encourage individuals to sign up for alerts and warnings, and assist them with
    • finding any needed information.

    For more information on IPAWS, EAS, and WEA, visit www.ready.gov/alerts. Additionally you can check out FEMA’s online training course for IPAWS:

    NEW: IPAWS for Alerting Authorities

  • The 2014-2018 FEMA Strategic Plan

    You be hearing a LOT about preparedness for us as we gear up toward National Preparedness Month 2014 (and we'll announce this year's Theme as soon as it is released.) Also, you'll get daily updates on National Preparedness Month not just during September, but almost every day in August, too (after all PREparedness means before, right? And, too, our readers need time to plan, gather supplies, etc. to share with friends, family, and co-workers during National Preparedness Month.) This year is significant as it is the first year in the next "4 year plan" for FEMA, too.

    FEMA Strat PlanFEMA’s Strategic Plan is created every four year and outlines a clear roadmap for building a stronger, dynamic, and innovative New FEMA that fulfills our vision of becoming the Nation’s Preeminent Emergency Management and Preparedness Agency. The 2014-2018 FEMA Strategic Plan has been released (download below)

    The 2014-2018 FEMA Strategic Plan reflects objectives the Agency will accomplish to provide the best possible support to the American people before, during, and after disasters. It sets forth the strategies FEMA will employ to accomplish the objectives and also establishes measurable outcomes to achieve. This Strategic Plan was developed through the involvement of hundreds of FEMA employees and many external stakeholders who contributed to generating our objectives, strategies, and outcomes, and who are now working to execute this Plan. FEMA is just one part of the Nation’s emergency management team. The Agency will be successful only by building, sustaining, and drawing upon the capabilities of the whole community. The support and engagement of partners throughout Federal, state, and local governments; tribal governments; the private sector; faith-based and non-profit communities; and citizens across our country will ensure our collective success in bringing about the outcomes set forth in this Plan.

    Disaster, Survival, Preparation

    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
    Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, you should Check your Emergency Supplies, too:

    • Count your stock... is it enough?
    • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    • Keep cash on hand
    • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    • Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
  • Emergency Management Institute

    Emergency Management Institute Mission

    Emergency Management Institute Mission

    To support the Department of Homeland Security and FEMA’s goals by improving the competencies of the U.S. officials in Emergency Management at all levels of government to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the potential effects of all types of disasters and emergencies on the American people.

    • EMI is the emergency management community’s flagship training institution, and provides training to Federal, State, local, tribal, volunteer, public, and private sector officials to strengthen emergency management core competencies for professional, career-long training.
    • EMI directly supports the implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS), the National Response Framework (NRF), the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF), and the National Preparedness Goal (NPG) by conveying necessary knowledge and skills to improve the nation’s capability.
    • EMI trains more than 2 million students annually. Training delivery systems include residential onsite training; offsite delivery in partnership with emergency management training systems, colleges, universities; and technology-based mediums to conduct individual training courses for emergency management personnel across the Nation.
    • EMI is located on the campus of the National Emergency Training Center (NETC), Emmitsburg, Maryland.    Prepper
    Department of Homeland Security SealEmergency Management Institute
    16825 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg, MD 21727
    Switchboard: (301) 447-1000
    Admissions Fax: (301) 447-1658FEMA Independent Study Program
    Office: (301)447-1200    Fax: (301)447-1201

    DisasterAssistance.gov logo

    EMI Tower

    (800) 621-FEMA / TTY (800) 462-7585
    Step 1

    Before You Apply: Learn what disaster assistance is and what you should know before applying for assistance.

    Step 2

    Apply For Assistance on the web or by phone

    Step 3

    After you Apply: Learn what happens next.

     

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