electrical safety

  • Gadgets & Gizmos bring Safety Considerations

    So Santa treated you well, and you've now got every multimedia mind-boggling, sensory overloads device you could dream of.. now plug them all in and enjoy, eh?

    Stop and think a moment.

    Extension cords are a convenient way to power electrical devices, especially during the holiday season. However, without proper use, extension cords can become a fire hazard.

    Electrical Safety Electrical Safety

    extensionCordAccording to the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), most home electrical fires involve the home’s electrical wiring or lighting.  Follow these important USFA tips to keep your family safe:

    • » Replace worn, old, or damaged extension cords right away;
    • » Use extension cords for temporary purposes only;
    • » Avoid putting cords where they can be damaged or pinched, like under a carpet or rug;
    • » Don't overload power strips; and
    • » Use power strips that have internal overload protection.

    Keep your new toys and your home safe from electrical fire!

    electrical-fire-safety

  • Electrical Safety

    Electrical Safety is a concern for Electricians, Home DIY, and general workers.

    Each year there are 71 electrocutions (death by electricity) in the workplace throughout the US. By ensuring all safety equipment and tools are used properly this number can be reduced.

    Worker injuries, illnesses and fatalities

    4,405 workers were killed on the job in 2013 [BLS preliminary 2013 workplace fatality data] (3.2 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers) – on average, 85 a week or more than 12 deaths every day. (This is the lowest total since the fatal injury census was first conducted in 1992.)

    797 Hispanic or Latino workers were killed from work-related injuries in 2013–on average, more than 15 deaths a week or two Latino workers killed every single day of the year, all year long.

    Fatal work injuries involving contractors accounted for 17 percent of all fatal work injuries in 2013.

    Construction's "Fatal Four"

    Out of 3,929* worker fatalities in private industry in calendar year 2013, 796 or 20.3% were in construction?that is, one in five worker deaths last  year were in construction. The leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites were falls, followed by struck by object, electrocution, and caught-in/between. These "Fatal Four" were responsible for more than half (58.7%) the construction worker deaths in 2013*, BLS reports. Eliminating the Fatal Four would save 468 workers' lives in America every year.

    • Falls — 294 out of 796 total deaths in construction in CY 2013 (36.9%)

    • Struck by Object — 82 (10.3%)

    • Electrocutions — 71 (8.9%)

    • Caught-in/between — 21 (2.6%)

    Essential safety equipment for electricians

    Safety Glasses

    Dust and debris cause a lot of damage to the eyes, and most often people are unaware of it. Safety glasses for electricians are such a vital piece of equipment when you are on the job. If anything were to happen in terms of major damage, or built up damage, that will adversely affect your eye sight, you're going to have to live with that for the rest of your life. They come in different styles at different costs, if you're not keen on how they look, then spend a little more on a premium set.

    Insulated Gloves

    Easily one of the most essential pieces of equipment when working with live currents. Equipment like this can make the decision of life or death when an accident occurs, which makes insulated gloves a necessity. During the winter most electricians will wear a small pair of cotton gloves underneath to keep their hands warm.

    Footwear / Matting

    Dielectric shoes work the same way as insulated gloves do, except they are on your feet. As long as you have insulated gloves or shoes on then the current that tries to go through you to reach the ground will be stopped when getting an electric shock, preventing it. Matting is also great, however it can only be used in some circumstances due to space available and what type of job is being done.

    Insulated Tools

    Almost 50% of an electrician's job requires the use of tools, most often during inspection and testing, the tools are going to be testing live currents and it's essential that they are insulated. Everything can be found insulated, from saws to screws. If you have some slightly outdated tools, it might be best to upgrade!

    Hard Hats / Earplugs

    Commercial electricians who often work on building sites are in danger of head injuries because of the work site environment, which makes hard hats a necessity. Along with this danger, there is a lot of excessive noise on the site every single day, which can eventually start damaging your hearing. Earplugs will help prevent this damage and will also prevent headaches.

    Also read:


     

    Electrical Safety Icon See our Electrical Safety Training Books, CDs, DVDs, Manuals and Instructor Guides

    Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards.

    Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:

    • How electricity works.
    • Fuses and circuit breakers.
    • Grounding and GFIs.
    • Safe work practices.
    • Outlets, plugs and extension cords.
    • Working with electrical equipment.
    • Using ladders around electricity.
    • Electrical emergencies.
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Electrical Safety Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • Electrical Safety for Construction Site Workers

    Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards. Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:     How electricity works.     Fuses and circuit breakers.     Grounding and GFIs.     Safe work practices.     Outlets, plugs and extension cords.     Working with electrical equipment.     Using ladders around electricity.     Electrical emergencies.     and more. Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards.
    Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:
    How electricity works.
    Fuses and circuit breakers.
    Grounding and GFIs.
    Safe work practices.
    Outlets, plugs and extension cords.
    Working with electrical equipment.
    Using ladders around electricity.
    Electrical emergencies.
    and more.

    Whether renovating, tearing down or building from the ground up, construction sites are covered with electrical hazards. It is incumbent on workers to know risks and proper precautions. It is important for you and your coworkers to have access to proper safety equipment and basic safety training.

    Safety Equipment

    To perform safety on the job, your construction site should be well stocked with the following pieces of safety equipment.

    Personal protection: In many ways, personal protection is more important than any other piece of safety equipment because it directly protects you against electrical mishaps. Your required amount of personal protection depends on your potential exposure to electricity. Electrical gloves and footwear provide basic safety and potential life saving protection, such as protection from contact with an unseen wire behind a wall. When working with wiring or working in close contact with electrical equipment, take extra precautions by using a face shield, protective eyewear, fire-resistant helmet and protective earmuffs.

    Testing equipment: You should never handle wiring or electrical equipment without proper knowledge. Electrical power testing equipment provides crucial protection from unwanted and potential deadly surprises. Your worksite should be stocked with voltage detectors, receptacle testers and clamp meters.

    Cord protectors: Safe extension cords and outlet strips are a good start to safety practices. For additional precautions, your construction site should use cable covers and cord protectors. Power cords surround workers and it is easy to overlook cracks exposing wires; therefore, a damaged power cord can be deadly. For safety purposes, use sturdy floor cable protectors. Be sure these protectors are highly visible to prevent tripping on the worksite.

    Voltage regulators and circuit breakers: These are key pieces of safety equipment that prevent a problem from getting worse. You should always use a surge protector to shut off the worksite's power supply during an emergency. Additionally, a voltage regulator prevents equipment damage over time. It also prevents equipment damage during a surge of electricity.

    Safety Training

    safety-t See ALL our OSHA Safety Training Products!

    Safety equipment is crucial on a construction site. Without proper safety training, this equipment can only get you so far. Below are a few key areas in which you should be properly trained for safety on a construction site.

    Precautions: Some electrical hazards are out of your control while some are within your control. Reduce your risk of electrocution by taking the right precautions. For example, know where electrical wiring will be an issue on a construction site and label it for precaution measures. Likewise, use ground fault circuit interrupters for all receptacle outlets to prevent electrical shock.

    Equipment use: As a construction worker, it is easy to become comfortable with your equipment resulting in improper use of tools or practicing unknown hazards. Proper training can help identify unknown improper shortcuts and reduce the risk of equipment-related electrocution. Similarly, make sure coworkers know the proper way to use every tool especially in direct electrical work.

    Identifying problems: Construction sites are dangerous. Workers should practice identifying abnormalities and other hazards. For example, certain electrical problems will produce a distinct smell, or an overloaded electrical panel might hum differently than normal. Make a safety checklist and incorporate it into your daily routine. Workers should feel comfortable alerting a supervisor when exposed wires are present. Practicing overly cautious safety measures can save your life.

    Response: Do you know what to do if you spot a hazard? Do you know what to do if a coworker has suffered an electric shock? Being prepared to properly respond to safety situations is crucial. This includes knowing whether you are qualified to address the issue. If you spot a hazard, alert a supervisor and warn all coworkers about the issue to ensure proper precautions are taken. If a coworker suffers a shock on the job, make sure you have the right emergency phone numbers and immediate access to a phone. Also, know who is on staff and qualified to provide first aid response.

    Every Construction Site Needs Contractors & Construction Site First Aid Kits for OSHA COmpliacne Every Construction Site Needs Contractors & Construction Site First Aid Kits for OSHA COmpliacne

    First Aid: It is important for you and your coworkers to understand the basics of first aid. Every construction site should have a comprehensive first aid kit, including items such as burn creams and bandages. In some cases, a defibrillator is important to have on site. It can mean the difference between life and death for a shock victim. It is important for all workers to know the location of first aid equipment and have access to it.

    Author Bio:
    This article was written by Minerallac. A manufacturer and distributor of electrical construction hardware.

  • Assessing electrical fire risks in the workplace

    Making sure that your workplace is suitable for you and your employees to spend a large majority of their time is vital. In fact, if you do not pay enough attention to this particular area of your business, you could be fined, even be taken to court. There have been many cases in the past where employers simply do not assign priority when it comes to fire risk assessments, and in the event of a fire, employees may indeed sue the employer for their lack of attention and care.

    When conducting a risk assessment, there will be various aspects that you will be looking at. Some people prefer to hire a professional fire risk assessment company to enter the building and conduct an unbiased and comprehensive view of the premises to identify any risks. This gives peace of mind that the assessment has been carried out in a completely thorough, sufficient manner.

    This may be beneficial to you if you do not have enough time to conduct a thorough risk assessment yourself, or if you would like the view of a professional who may pick up on hazards which you may not have identified as a risk.

    Electrical Safety Icon See our Electrical Safety Training Books, CDs, DVDs, Manuals and Instructor Guides

    Electricity is all around us. It lights up our homes... powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use... and runs many of our tools. We are so used to it, most employees "take it for granted." Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards.

    Our training products on "Electrical Safety" remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for "non-qualified" employees. Topics covered in these products include:

    • How electricity works.
    • Fuses and circuit breakers.
    • Grounding and GFIs.
    • Safe work practices.
    • Outlets, plugs and extension cords.
    • Working with electrical equipment.
    • Using ladders around electricity.
    • Electrical emergencies.
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Electrical Safety Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

    Fire Safety icon See our Fire Prevention & Safety Training Books, CDs, DVDs, Manuals and Instructor Guides

    Among all the safety problems an employee can encounter, fire can be the most frightening. Every year office fires cause millions of dollars in damage and result in hundreds of employee injuries. Yet many employees do not realize how their own actions can contribute to the risk of fire.

    Our training products on "Fire Prevention in the Office" look at fires in office environments, review steps that can be taken to help prevent fires and discuss what employees should do in case of a fire emergency. Topics covered in these products include:

    • Common causes of office fires.
    • The concept of "flashpoint".
    • "Classes" of fires.
    • Importance of good housekeeping.
    • Preventing office fires.
    • Fire extinguishers.
    • Evacuation and other employee responsibilities.
    • First aid.
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    Fire Prevention in the Office Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • Deck the Halls, Don’t Burn Them

    Holiday lights and decorations are cheery, festive, fun (and often competitive) but they are a serious fire and electrocution hazard when not used safely...

    Holiday decorations can add to the fun and excitement of the season but they can also increase your risk for a home fire. Follow basic safety guidelines to prevent serious electrical and fire hazards during the festivities. As you deck the halls of your home this season, be fire smart:

    • Keep your tree at least three feet away from heat sources like fireplaces, radiators, candles or heat vents;
    • Do not let your tree (artificial or live) block exits;
    • Check light sets for frayed or damaged wiring before using;
    • Always turn off holiday lights before leaving home or going to bed; and
    • Connect no more than three mini light sets for decorating.

    If you have a live tree, remember to add water to the tree stand daily. A small fire that spreads to a Christmas tree can grow large very quickly. Watch this video by the National Fire Protection Association demonstrating how fast a dry Christmas tree burns compared to one that is watered regularly.

    Don’t let disaster ruin your holiday! Learn the facts about home holiday fires in support of the America’s PrepareAthon! campaign to increase disaster preparedness in your community.

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