Disaster Preparedness

  • Stuff This! Fun, useful, and inexpensive stocking stuffers!

    What's in your sock?

    Ours is full of fun, useful & inexpensive preparedness!

    From under $1 to about $15 you can build a mini-survival kit out of these great safety items everyone needs!

    Quick links to the featured items… (in stock!)

    … consider adding either the Light Stick - High Intensity (L88A) or make it fun with Theme Bandages or Emergency Underpants
    BAM! You’ve got a 5 to 10 item emergency kit for around $10! Check out all the great UNDER $5 Stocking Stuffer Ideas!


    See our other “On SALE” ideas, too - or check out these great emergency & preparedness items:

    Image of an emergency survival kit in a port a potty bucket with food, water and supplies

    Disaster Kits

    Survival Kits For Emergency Disaster Preparedness

    Image of long lasting emergency food rations

    Food & Water

    Emergency Food Rations & Water Supply

    Image of a two person emergency sleeping bag and a Mylar Solar Emergency Space Blanket

    Shelter & Sleeping

    Emergency Blankets, Tents, Canopies, Tarps & More

    Image of whistles and short-range radio walkie talkies

    Signal & Messaging

    Devices for Signaling & Communicating in Emergencies

    Image of a Swiss Army style knife showing the concept of a multi-function tool

    Survival Tools

    Fire Starters, Survival Knives, SOL, Leatherman & much more

    Graphical portrayal through photos of a flashlight and waterproof matches showing the need for light and warmth in an emergency

    Emergency Heat & Light

    Warmers, Heating, Candles-Flashlights-Lanterns-GlowSticks

    Image of the CERT (Community Emergecy Response Team) Logo in an ebroidered PAtch (to siginify that First Aid Mart Carries a full line of C.E.R.T.Gear)

    CERT Gear & Supplies

    CERT Kits & vests, caps, shirts, logo patches, fieldbooks +

    Image of an American Red Cross Emergency Disaster Supplies kit with contents spread out to show all thetypes of food, water, emergency shelter and signaling required in an earthquake or other disaster.

    Red Cross Supplies

    American Red Cross Emergency Kits: Be Red Cross Ready

    Image of the four stages of Triage: Minor delayed care / can delay up to three hours - Delayed urgent care / can delay up to one hour - Immediate immediate care / life-threatening - Deceased (Morgue) victim is dead or mortally wounded / no care

    Triage & Incident Command

    S.T.A.R.T. Triage Tags, Tape, Kits + ICS Gear and Supplies

    Image of Toilet Paper and Hand Sanitizer - to show the importance of considering sanitation needs in gering up for emergencies and disaster survival

    Sanitation & Hygiene

    Personal Hygiene Kits, Toilets & Chemicals + Sanitary Items

    AAA Emergency Roadside Kit image to depict the need to prepare personal and company vehicles for emergency situations - emergencies occur while away from home adnd work as well.

    Roadside+Auto Emergency

    Auto Emergency Survival Kits, Roadside Tools & Survival Items

    Imageof two empty backas - building an emergency disasster preparedness and survival kit starts with considering what to pack all your gear in!

    Empty Bags & Containers

    Backpacks, Duffels, Buckets and Rolling kits to build your own

    Photo of a Search and Rescue kit showing the typical SAR Gear needs such as; helmet, ropes, etc.

    SAR Gear: Rescue Stuff

    Search & Rescue Kits and Essential SAR Provisions

    Cute picture of a dog wearing a stethoscope.

    Disaster Supplies for Pets

    Disaster Emergency Kits for Dogs and Cats + Survival Food

    Image of a FIre Extinguisher and a Fireman's Axe to signify preparedness for fires and evacuation

    Fire Safety & Evacuation

    Caution Tapes, Escape Masks & Ladders + Fire Safety Gear

    Image of survival guides and DVDs - learn about preparedness, sheltering in place, and survival

    Survival Guides & Videos

    Disaster Planning Books, Checklists & Videos for Survival

    Image showing a bright and highlt visible safety vest with reflective strips

    Hi-Vis Safety Vests

    CERT Vests & Bright Reflective Safety Vests for Visibility

    Image of a EMT/Paramedic style Trauma REsponse go Bag with the typical emergency medical equipment required for field traums rescue.

    Trauma & Field Medicine

    1st Aid, Trauma, Responder, Field Medical & Mass Casualty

  • 3 Steps to Prepare for Hurricanes

    As we progress into the Hurricane Season, each of us need to take inventory of our supplies, assess our readiness, and plan for safety in a storm.

    According to FEMA director, Craig Fugate, his should begin with three basic steps:

    1. Know your evacuation zone.  Evacuation zones are areas that may be impacted by hurricane flooding. Many communities have designated evacuation zones and routes to get citizens to safety. This information can often be found on the websites of your state, county, or town emergency management offices. If a hurricane threatens your community and local officials say it's time to evacuate, don't wait.
    2. Disaster-Survival-First-Aid-Mart Disaster Kits Food & Water Shelter & Sleeping CERT Gear & Supplies Red Cross Supplies Roadside+Auto Emergency

      Download the FEMA app. With the FEMA smartphone app you’ll have all the information you need to know what to do before, during, and after a hurricane.  You can also receive weather alerts in your area from NOAA’s National Weather Service, find lifesaving safety tips, and have access to disaster resources should you need them. You can download the app from the Apple App store or the Google Play store. The FEMA app is also available in Spanish.

    3. Make a plan and build a kit. When a hurricane hits, communications systems can go out, transportation can be limited, and it could be days before emergency responders are able to reach your community if you need help. Making a plan - and practicing that plan - helps to ensure you and your family are safe and ready for these challenges.  Your plan should include:
    • Family communication plan: Talk with your family members about how you will contact one another in an emergency. Know how you will check in with family members in different locations, how you will care for children or members with access and functional needs, and how your family will get in touch if cell phone, internet, or landlines don’t work.
    • Emergency Supply KitA ‘go kit’ is a bag that contains basic items you and your family may need, during an emergency. Kits should contain non-perishable food, water, and other supplies, such as flashlights, local maps, and a battery-powered radio, to last you and your family for at least 72 hours.
    • Pets: Many local shelters do not permit pets, but laws require them to accept service animals. Know what you will do with your pet if you need to evacuate.

    Hurricane Season just began June 1st and runs through November 30th - Prepare Now!

     

  • Webinar Tomorrow: STEP into Preparedness

    Join the Federal Emergency Management Agency on Thursday, January 11, 2016, as we present the newly updated Student Tools for Emergency Planning (STEP) materials and share tips and lessons learned from teaching the program.

    STEP is a classroom-based emergency preparedness curriculum that teaches fourth and fifth-graders about emergencies and how to create a disaster supply kit and family emergency communications plan.

    CERT Gear & Supplies CERT Gear & Supplies

    Title: Step into Preparedness
    Date: Thursday, February 11, 2016
    Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EST

    Featured Speakers:

    • Louise Gorham, Health Imperatives
    • Tod Pritchard, Wisconsin Emergency Management
    • Robert Scata, Connecticut Emergency Management and Homeland Security

    Read these to get Ready! Youth PreparednessYouth Preparedness CouncilUpdate on Youth Preparedness

    How to Join the Student Tools for Emergency Planning Webinar: Click Here

  • Winter Preparedness for Your Business

    Disaster-Survival-First-Aid-MartIf a winter storm should strike, do you have safeguards in place to protect your business? Preparing your business for both short and long-term interruptions is important. Additionally, business owners should consider having an action or communications plan for their employees.

    What can a business do? Assign a leader and get these thing done for the sake of continuing your business after the storms, and for the safety of your employees and visitors:

    Before the Storm

    • Check your insurance coverage protection against winter hazards;
    • Develop a procedure for restoring electrical services on an item-by-item basis; and
    • Develop a procedure for relocating salvageable and undamaged stock and supplies.
    • Have emergency supplies on hand to care for your group for 72 hours or longer

    During the Storm

    • Keep driveways, walkways, and doorways clear of snow and ice;
    • Open water faucets to let them drip to keep water flowing through the pipes vulnerable to freezing; and
    • Have the names and phone numbers of your heating contractor, plumber, fire department, insurance agent, and building owner accessible.

    Disaster-Survival-Preparedness

  • Why people live in disaster zones

    Do you live in a Tsunami Zone, a Flood Basin, or in Tornado Alley? We are right in the middle of earthquake country... sure, we could move, but we don't.

    According to Discovery News, we humans may be willing to put daily pleasure ahead of the threat of long-term disaster when selecting where to live, a new international study suggests. Study co-author Professor Ben Newell, of the University of NSW, said the research examined how people would react to being told of a predicted increase in the risk of natural disasters with climate change. Professor Newell, from the School of Psychology, said it was surprising how little weight participants in the study gave to disaster threat.

    Most Americans live within 25 miles of their mothers, according to a study co-authored by an economics researcher and Robert A. Pollak, Ph.D., at Washington University in St. Louis.

    Alarmingly, according to the article "Calculated Risk: Why People Live in Disaster Zones" There was also a tendency after a disaster had hit for some people to move into that area, which is consistent with a kind of thinking that lightning isn’t going to strike in the same spot twice... not very sound reasoning.

    Prepare and Endure! Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, too, you should Check your Emergency Supplies:
    Count your stock... is it enough?
    Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    Keep cash on hand
    Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
  • Household Disaster Preparedness

    While businesses and community groups often focus on preparedness, oftentimes, households are themselves unready - is your home ready?

    During National Preparedness Month Be Sure You Are READY!

    Prepper

    Household Disaster Preparedness: Influences of Preparedness Knowledge and Beliefs — United States, 2015

    Prepare! Prepare!

    Understanding people’s knowledge and beliefs regarding household disaster preparedness might make public-health messages promoting household preparedness more effective. It is believed that knowledge influences behavior, and that attitudes and beliefs, which are correlated with knowledge, might also influence behavior. To determine the association between knowledge and beliefs and household preparedness, CDC analyzed baseline data from Ready CDC, a personal disaster preparedness intervention piloted within the CDC workforce during 2013–2015. Compared with persons with basic preparedness knowledge, persons with advanced knowledge were more likely to have assembled an emergency kit (44 percent versus 17 percent), developed a written household disaster plan (9 percent versus 4 percent), and received county emergency alert notifications (63 percent versus 41 percent). Similarly, beliefs about preparedness affected household preparedness behaviors.

  • 4 Steps to take before Disaster Strikes

    We share a lot of our own suggestions and advice culled from decades of experience in lifesaving and disaster preparation for our clients. Today we'd like to share a post from another author.

    There are four steps you should take before a disaster:

    1. Find out what could happen to you.
    2. Create a disaster plan
    3. Complete the checklist
    4. Practice and maintain your plan.
    Prepare and Endure! Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, too, you should Check your Emergency Supplies:
    Count your stock... is it enough?
    Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    Keep cash on hand
    Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.

    Disasters occur in the United States with regularity. What will you do before, during, and after a disaster? Before a disaster, you should know how to respond, plan your escape, locate supplies, develop an emergency communications plan, and set up an emergency pen for pets. During a disaster, you should listen to a battery-powered radio or TV or instructions. After the disaster, you should turn off all utilities if there is time. If you need to evacuate leave as soon as possible, but leave a note saying where you are going. You should notify emergency responders for injured or trapped people. Finally, you should return home only after authorities advise it is safe to do so. Read more on Family Disaster Planning by Fred Fanning

  • You’re Invited to a Special TweetChat: #PrepareAthon

    On Thursday, February 26 at 2 p.m. Eastern Time, emergency managers will host a special TweetChat titled “What is America’s PrepareAthon! and How to Participate.” Join the chat to learn more about this national, grassroots campaign for action to increase community preparedness and resilience through hazard-specific group discussions, drills, and exercises.

    FEMADuring the conversation, you can also connect with preparedness groups, businesses, emergency managers, and city officials about the campaign, disaster preparedness efforts, and how to take action. Hear from communities and organizations around the country who have participated in America’s PrepareAthon! activities previously or are planning to participate in an upcoming event. Ask questions related to preparing your own community, and begin planning your own America’s PrepareAthon! event.

    Join in or follow along using #PrepareAthon. You can also help spread the word about the TweetChat on your social media outlets by sharing this message: “We’re joining the #PrepareAthon conversation on 2/26 at 2PM ET to learn how to increase community preparedness and so should you!”

    Prepare and Endure! Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, too, you should Check your Emergency Supplies:
    Count your stock... is it enough?
    Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    Keep cash on hand
    Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
  • Go FedEx! Way to be Responsible!

    OK - so we're already FedEx fans... we get great rates to pass on to our customers, and we have an awesome Rep that takes special care of us... but this impressed us:

    FedEx

    While it is in FedEx's own interest to send out Service Alerts such as the above warning of possible service interruptions and delays, they have no direct business purpose in offering Disaster Preparedness tips and checklists, but they do anyway.

    They take the extra time to post and share disaster safety information and links to sites like the National Weather Service to help people stay informed.  Good business. Good PR, Good for you FedEx.

    Here's their Emergency Preparedness Checklist for Small Businesses:

    Developing an emergency preparedness plan is one of the most important strategic decisions you will make as a small business owner. Consider how a natural, human-caused or public health disaster could affect your employees, customers and workplace. Would business operations continue? Preparing your small business doesn’t have to be time consuming or expensive. Ask yourself the three questions below and use this checklist to help you prepare your business to stay in business.

    1. How vulnerable would your business be if a disaster or other emergency were to occur?

    ? Know your region and the types of disaster most likely to have an impact on your
    business.

    • Find out what emergencies have occurred in the past and what impact these had on other businesses in your area.
    • Consider your facility’s physical capacity to resist damage and proximity to flood plains, seismic faults, dams, hazardous materials, nuclear power plants and other hazards.
    • Consult with your insurance agent and learn what coverage is available and what precautions to take for disasters that may impact your business. Remember, many general policies do not cover earthquake and flood damage.

    ? Assess the capacity of your employees to prepare for and respond to an emergency.

    • Are 10- 15 percent of your employees trained in basic first-aid and CPR techniques? Do all employees know how to identify individuals who are trained?
    • Are employee roles clearly defined in the event of a disaster or emergency?

    ? Identify external emergency response resources that will provide assistance during a disaster or other emergency. Who will you contact in an emergency and what will they be able to provide?

    • Local and state police.
    • Fire department and emergency medical services organizations.
    • Local government officials, emergency management office.
    • Local American Red Cross chapter.
    • National Weather Service.
    • Telephone, water, gas and electric companies.
    • Neighboring businesses.

    Disaster-Survival-Gear2. What is your plan to protect the business and its employees before, during and after an emergency?

    ? Identify a First Aid team. Approximately 10-15 percent of your workforce should be trained in first aid and CPR so that they can assist in times of disaster or emergency until help arrives.

    ? Obtain necessary safety equipment. Budget for and purchase any safety equipment, first-aid kits, Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs) fire extinguishers, smoke detectors and shelter-in-place supplies that may be needed. Make sure employees know how to use and access these supplies.

    ? Write a plan for responding to emergencies. Your plan should include:

    • A system for warning employees about emergencies and communicating with employees and local emergency management officials during a disaster or emergency.
    • Considerations for the special needs of employees with disabilities and medical conditions.
    • Evacuation routes from your facility and an established location where employees should gather.
    • Provisions and a location for employees to shelter-in-place.

    ? Develop a Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP). This plan will help keep your business operating as it responds and recovers from the effects of a disaster or emergency situation. Here’s how to start developing a COOP:

    • Establish procedures for COOP activation.
    • Identify essential business functions and staff to carry out these functions.
    • Establish procedures with suppliers, vendors and other businesses critical to daily operations.
    • Create a plan for conducting business if the facility is not accessible and set up electronic back up systems for vital business files.
    • Identify records and documents that must be readily accessible to perform essential functions and decide where these can be stored safely and retrieved quickly.

    3. What can we do to integrate emergency preparedness procedures into our every day business operations?

    ? Educate Employees. Consider partnering with community organizations to help create comprehensive preparedness training. All employees should know:

    • Their role during a disaster and the roles and responsibilities of key personnel at your facility.
    • Warning and communication procedures.
    • Evacuation and shelter-in-place procedures.

    ? Practice Your Plan. Practice makes perfect. Conduct regular evacuation, COOP activation and shelter-in-place drills.

    • Use the drills to assess the readiness of your employees and your facility.
    • Involve both personnel and community responders in the evaluation process and use lessons learned to improve procedures and increase training as needed.

    ? Encourage personal preparedness among employees. Your employees will be better able to help your business respond and recover from an emergency if they know how to prepare their homes and families.

    • Offer first aid, CPR, AED and preparedness training
    • Encourage your employees and their families to:
    • Get a Kit, Make a Plan, Be Informed. A free online education module is available to help them at www.redcross.org/BeRedCrossReady.
    • Encourage employees to identify alternative routes for going to and from your facility.
    • Remind employees to always keep their emergency contact information current.

    ? Help your community get prepared. Work with local community groups and government officials to ensure that your community is prepared for disasters and other emergencies.

    • Host blood drives.
    • Work with your local Red Cross chapter to train community disaster education volunteers to conduct preparedness presentations.
    • Contribute supplies and/or services to emergency efforts.
    • Adopt a local school or school district and support their emergency preparedness programs.
    Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in? Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in?
  • Today is America's PrepareAthon 2014

    Participating in America’s PrepareAthon! is easy and inexpensive. Your organization can participate in several ways:

    • Hold discussions and drills to explain workplace plans and policies and to motivate your employees, students, congregants, and volunteers to be better prepared at home.
    • Conduct a table-top exercise with leaders and managers to take steps as an organization to increase your readiness.
    • Promote America’s PrepareAthon! throughout your networks.

    Why Participate

    America’s PrepareAthon! enables individuals and organizations to prepare for specific hazards through informative presentations, group discussions and activities, and tabletop exercises. Organizations have tremendous influence on their members and constituents when it comes to preparing for a disaster. For example, when employers encourage employees to be prepared for disasters, employees are 75 percent more likely to take action. And with more than 63 percent of the U.S. population aged 16 or older in the labor force, the workplace is one of the most effective environments for educating and encouraging people to take steps to be ready for disasters.

    Participating in America’s PrepareAthon! will benefit your workplace or community organization by helping you to:

    • Increase knowledge of safety policies and procedures;
    • Build morale and trust by demonstrating a commitment to safety and well-being;
    • Enhance organizational coordination and communication on preparedness and continuity of operations;
    • Reduce a disaster’s effects, including injury and loss of life, property or inventory damage, and financial loss from business disruption; and
    • Strengthen relationships with local emergency responders and community leaders to reach a common understanding of community risks, needs, and capabilities.

    *** Don’t miss all our great Disaster Preparedness Articles, Tips, Survival Plans, Guides and Emergency Preparedness Recommendations in the National Preparedness Month Blog

    Be-Take-Action-To-Prepare

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