DEET

  • Zika Scare

    There's a lot of hype around the Zika Virus, and just like when everyone was panicking over Ebola last year, there'a a lot of media exaggeration, social rumor, and misinformation out there.

    What is Zika? Zika virus disease exhibits symptoms including fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

    Is it dangerous? Yes. Primarily in that it causes serious risk to unborn children, including Guillain-Barré syndrome and pregnant women giving birth to babies with birth defects and poor pregnancy outcomes.

    How do you avoid Zika Virus? Both the CDC and WHO recommend EPA approved insect repellents to repel mosquitoes as they are the main carrier of the disease.

    Other point for Zika prevention from the CDC:

    • No vaccine exists to prevent Zika virus disease (Zika).
    • Prevent Zika by avoiding mosquito bites (see below).
    • Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus bite mostly during the daytime.
    • Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus also spread dengue and chikungunya viruses.

    When traveling to countries where Zika virus or other viruses spread by mosquitoes are found, take the following steps:

    • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
    • Stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
    • Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are overseas or outside and are not able to protect yourself from mosquito bites.
    • insectrepellents-animatedUse Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breast-feeding women.
      • Always follow the product label instructions
      • Reapply insect repellent as directed.
      • Do not spray repellent on the skin under clothing.
      • If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.
    • If you have a baby or child:
      • Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months of age.
      • Dress your child in clothing that covers arms and legs, or
      • Cover crib, stroller, and baby carrier with mosquito netting.
      • Do not apply insect repellent onto a child’s hands, eyes, mouth, and cut or irritated skin.
      • Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to a child’s face.
    • Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items.
      • Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See product information to learn how long the protection will last.
      • If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.
      • Do NOT use permethrin products directly on skin. They are intended to treat clothing.

     Interesting related readingWhat is DEET? Is it Safe?World Mosquito DayThe Best Way to Stop Bug Bites according to Consumer ReportsChoose Your Cover,

  • Lyme Disease

    Fight the Bite! Fight the Bite!

    Spring & Summer mean outdoor activities. Outdoors means ticks and risk of Lyme Disease.

    The CDC says: Before gardening, camping, hiking, or just playing outdoors, make tick bite prevention part of your outdoor plans.

    Lyme disease is the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in the United States. An estimated 300,000 infections occur each year, of which only 30,000 are reported to CDC by state health departments.

    The risk is greatest among those living in or visiting New England, the mid-Atlantic states, and the upper Midwest. A recent national survey found that nearly 20 percent of people in areas where Lyme disease is common were unaware of the danger. Fortunately, there are several tactics you and your family can use to prevent tick bites and reduce your risk of tickborne disease.

    Protect Yourself from Tick Bites

    Know where to expect ticks. Blacklegged ticks live in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas. You may come into contact with ticks during outdoor activities around your home or when walking through vegetation such as leaf litter or shrubs. To avoid ticks, walk in the center of trails and avoid tall vegetation.

    Use a repellent with DEET (on skin or clothing) or permethrin (on clothing and gear). Repellents containing 20% or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can be applied to the skin, and they can protect up to several hours. Always follow product instructions! Parents should apply repellents to their children, taking care to avoid application to hands, eyes, and mouth. Products containing permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing, and camping gear. Treated items can remain protective through several washings.

    Tick

  • DEET, showers, and tick checks can stop ticks.

    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    Stop Ticks.

    Reduce your chances of getting a tickborne disease by using repellents, checking for ticks, and showering after being outdoors. If you have a tick bite followed by a fever or rash, seek medical attention.

    Gardening, camping, hiking, and playing outdoors – when enjoying these activities, don't forget to take steps to prevent bites from ticks that share the outdoors. Ticks can infect humans with bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can cause serious illness.

    Before You Go Outdoors

    • Know where to expect ticks. Ticks live in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas. You may come into contact with ticks during outdoor activities around your home or when walking through leaf litter or near shrubs. Always walk in the center of trails in order to avoid contact with ticks.
    • Products containing permethrin kill ticks. Permethrin can be used to treat boots, clothing and camping gear and remain protective through several washings.
    • Use a repellent with DEET on skin. Repellents containing 20% or more DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can protect up to several hours. Always follow product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding the hands, eyes, and mouth. For detailed information about using DEET on children, see recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
    • For detailed information about tick prevention and control, see Avoiding Ticks. Detailed information for outdoor workers can be found at NIOSH Safety and Health Topic: Tick-borne Diseases.

    After You Come Indoors

    Check your clothing for ticks. Ticks may be carried into the house on clothing. Any ticks that are found should be removed. Placing clothes into a dryer on high heat for at least an hour effectively kills ticks.

    Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease. Showering may help wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.

    Check your body for ticks after being outdoors. Conduct a full body check upon return from potentially tick-infested areas, which even includes your back yard. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Check these parts of your body and your child's body for ticks:

    • Under the arms
    • In and around the ears
    • Inside belly button
    • Back of the knees
    • In and around the hair
    • Between the legs
    • Around the waist

    What to Do if You Find an Attached Tick

    Remove the attached tick as soon as you notice it by grasping with tweezers, as close to the skin as possible, and pulling it straight out. For detailed information about tick removal, see the tick removal page.

    Watch for signs of illness such as rash or fever in the days and weeks following the bite, and see a health care provider if these develop. Your risk of acquiring a tick-borne illness depends on many factors, including where you live, what type of tick bit you, and how long the tick was attached. If you become ill after a tick bite, see a health care provider.

    Reduce Ticks in Your Yard

    • Modify your landscape to create Tick-Safe Zones[6.82 MB]. Regularly remove leaf litter and clear tall grasses and brush around homes, and place wood chips or gravel between lawns and wooded areas to keep ticks away from recreational areas, and keep play areas and playground equipment away from away from shrubs, bushes, and other vegetation.
    • Consider using a chemical control agent. Effective tick control chemicals are available for use by the homeowner, or they can be applied by a professional pest control expert, and even limited applications can greatly reduce the number of ticks. A single springtime application of acaricide can reduce the population of ticks that cause Lyme disease by 68–100%.
    • Discourage deer. Removing plants that attract deer and constructing physical barriers may help discourage deer from entering your yard and bringing ticks with them.

    Prevent Ticks on Animals

    Use tick control products to prevent family pets from bringing ticks into the home. Tick collars, sprays, shampoos, or “top spot” medications should be used regularly to protect your animals and your family from ticks. Consult your veterinarian and be sure to use these products according to the package instructions. For more information on animals and health, see Preventing Ticks on Your Pet.
  • What is DEET? Is it Safe?

    Is DEET bad? No - it's actually a very effective insect repellent (also spelled insect repellant accurately, in  case you were wondering) and the environmental impact and safety concerns are mostly urban legend and FAR outweighed by the efficacy and heath benefits (you don't want Lyme Disease or West Nile Virus, do you?)

    Environmental Working Group’s science review concluded that although DEET certainly isn’t perfect, its safety profile is actually better than a lot of people think. Given that DEET is highly effective, reasonably safe and has been used billions of times, we concluded that it’s a reasonable choice when you need a repellent that really works.

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    Why Use Repellents? ( Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products )

    Bites from mosquitoes and other insects, as well as ticks (which officially are arthropods, not insects), are more than just annoying. They can lead to lasting health issues and can even result in death. Through proper use of DEET-based repellents, you and your loved ones can enjoy outdoor activities more comfortably. Perhaps more importantly, you’ll help reduce the risk of getting Lyme disease, West Nile virus and a host of other serious illnesses spread by these pests.

    West Nile virus, which is spread by mosquitoes, is less common than Lyme disease but can be significantly more dangerous.

    Mosquitoes, ticks and other insects can be annoying. But, being bothersome is a minor issue when compared to the serious diseases they can transmit. Here in the United States, the most common tick-borne disease is Lyme disease, spread by the deer tick.

    For more on insects, visit www.aboutbugs.com.

    West Nile Virus Cases Reported by the CDC

    WNV Neurological Disease

    WNV Fever

    WNV Fatalities

    11,053

    15820

    1083

    Many WN fever and other cases are unreported

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is found through out the continental United States and in all Canadian Provinces. The most serious form of the disease is neurological and results in encephalitis and meningitis, both infections that cause serious, sometimes deadly, brain inflammation. Survivors often have lingering symptoms including paralysis, blindness, and memory problems. WNV fever is less serious, but its victims can be sick for many months before recovering. The CDC reports that those with high blood pressure and diabetes are at greater risk than the general population for contracting the more serious forms of WNV. Those older than 50 are also at greater risk, but the disease can afflict individuals of all ages and in 2007 victims ranged in age from 3 months to 90 years of age.

    DEET
    • N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide, abbreviated DEET, is a slightly yellow oil. It is the most common active ingredient in insect repellents.
    • Formula: C12H17NO
    • IUPAC ID: N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide
    • Melting point: -49°F (-45°C)
    • Boiling point: 550.4°F (288°C)
    • Molar mass: 191.27 g/mol
    • Density: 998.00 kg/m³
    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    When do most people think about applying Insect Repellent? AFTER they've been bitten! Be sure to stock up on Insect Sting Relief as well as Bug Repellent!
    Insect Repellant & Bug Repellent Pumps and continuous spray. Wasp & Hornet Spray, Bite Relief with Applicator & Repellent Towelettes / Wipes. Protect from Asian Tiger Mosquito, Dengue, Yellow Fever, West Nile and more. See Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

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