burn

  • How Hot is Hot?

    After spending the first week of the month discussing topics related to burns and scalds for Burn Week, we receive many questions about how hot various heat sources are. We dug in and found this in our OSHA 10 Hour Safety Training materials we created back in 2001... Here's a table of the common temperatures of work-related heat sources:Temperature Source

  • Burn Care

    Here we are at the end of Burn Awareness Week. We've discuss the importance of  Keeping Your Family Safe and provided a Checklist To Prevent Scald Burns and other burn avoidance tips, we explained how seniors and children are at the highest risk of scalds injuries, and even looked at Cooking Safety tips to avoid these injuries in the kitchen.

    Now what do you do if you get scalded or burnt despite good precautionary measures?

    Read Burn First Aid – What to put on a burn & How to treat burns to learn what to to.

    Burn Care

    Burn Safety Supplies Burn Safety Supplies

    Burns happen unexpectedly and abruptly; they need to be treated promptly! Our Burn Care supplies and kits are designed to treat a variety of burns, effective, and fast-acting. Prepare yourself for these injuries so that you can jump-start the healing process before medical professionals can provide aid.

  • Seniors and Scalding Burn Injuries

    Aside from perception and mobility hazards, older adults can be at greater risk of scald burn injuries, as poor microcirculation can also cause deeper and more serious burns.

    For Burn Awareness Week, we would like to share some precautions to take to help reduce burn and scald injuries in Seniors:

    Senior~ Older adults may have conditions that make them more prone to falls in the bathtub, shower, or while carrying hot liquids. Provide a bell or whistle for people who may need assistance to call for help while bathing and install grab bars and non-slip mats. Older adults (and people with certain medical conditions) may not be able to escape scalding water on their own. Provide a way for them to call for help, especially in the bathroom

    ~ Mobility impairments, slow or awkward movements, muscle weakness, fatigue, or slower reflexes increase the risk of spills and burns.

    ~ Moving hot liquids can be extremely difficult for someone who uses a cane or walker.

    ~ Certain medications can decrease a person’s ability to feel heat and they may burn themselves without knowing. Sensory impairments, changes in a person’s perception, memory, judgment, or awareness may hinder their ability to recognize burn dangers.

    ~ Tablecloths can also become tangled in crutches, walkers, or wheelchairs. Use non-slip placemats instead of tablecloths.

    ~ Burns on the lap are common when a person attempts to carry hot liquids while seated in a wheelchair. Use a large sturdy serving tray with raised edges to transfer food from the stove to the table if you or someone have mobility impairments or are unsteady or shaky.

     

  • A Checklist To Prevent Scald Burns - Keep Your Family Safe

    • MicroSet your water heater at 120 degrees F/48 degrees C, or just below the medium setting.
    • Use a thermometer to test the water coming out of your bath water tap.
    • Run your hand through bath water to test for hot spots.
    • Use back burners and turn pot handles toward the back of the stove so children cannot pull them down.
    • Use oven mitts when cooking or handling hot food and drinks.
    • Place microwaves at a safe height, within easy reach, for all users to avoid spills and burns and handle food safely. The face of the person using the microwave should always be higher than the front door to prevent burns. Children under age 7 should not use microwaves unless supervised
    • Stir and test food cooked in the microwave before serving. Open heated containers away from you from back to front.
    • Keep children away from the stove when cooking by using a safety gate for younger children and marking with tape a 3-foot "no-kid zone" for older children.
    • Keep hot drinks away from the edge of tables and counters and avoid using tablecloths and place mats.
    • Use a "travel mug" with a tight-fitting lid for all hot drinks.
    • Never hold or carry a child while you have a hot drink in your hand.

    Burn Week

  • Burn Week

    Burn Awareness Week, begins tomorrow - this year the focus will be on scalds, which are a hot-coffeecommon burn type in business as well as in the home. Scalds are easily preventable, and also easily overlooked as the risk of serious injury is apparently low, when in reality a water scald of just 2 seconds at 148°F (64°C) can create enough damage to require surgery,

    How would you get a scald at the high temperature? It's not really that high. The medium setting on your water heater is already over 120°F (48°C) and boiling water (fixing pasta?) is 212°F (100°C.)

    Be scald aware... set your water heater just below medium, keep pot handles turned in when cooking, and thing about heat and the danger it represents.

  • Burns? 5 Easy Steps

    Nobody is a stranger to burns. Most burns are minor injuries that occur while at work or at home. However, burns can be very serious, permanently damaging (even minor ones when not cared for properly) and even lethal.

    it is important to know those few basic steps that could help heal the injury effectively.

    Here is what you should do:

    1. Remove the Burn source. If Electrical, shit off the power, If fire, smother the flames by covering them with a blanket or water. (never water if electrical or grease fire, though!) If clothing catches fire, never run. Instead, stop, drop, and roll on the ground to smother the flames.

    2. Cool the burn for about 10 - 20 minutes by holding under cool, running water. Never use ice.

    3. Do a thorough check-up for other harm, as the burn may not be the only injury.

    4. Remove any jewelry or clothing at the site of the burn. If the clothing is adhered to the burn, do not remove it. Carefully cut around the stuck fabric to remove what you can without damaging the burnt tissue. (Jewelry may be difficult to remove later if swelling occurs, so be sure to take off early in treatment.)

    5. Apply specific burn treatment medications if available, but never any "home remedies". Cover the burn with a clean, dry cloth to reduce the risk of infection.

    Beware of possible Shock symptoms and seek professional help as burn injuries can be more serious than they appear.

    Read more: BurnsBurn SafetyTypes of BurnsBurn First Aid – What to put on a burn & How to treat burns

    Burn

     

  • Don't Fry the House Down Tomorrow!

    Season’s Gr-Eatings!

    According to the U.S. Fire Administration, Thanksgiving is the peak day for home fires involving cooking equipment. By making safety part of the Thanksgiving dinner menu, you can avoid preventable cooking fires. Here are some steps to follow when preparing your holiday feast:

    • Test your smoke alarms to make sure they are working;
      Fire & Evacuation Essentials Fire & Evacuation Essentials
    • Keep children at least 3 feet away from the stove; and
    • Keep an eye on what you are cooking.

    In recent years, deep-frying turkeys has become a popular cooking method. While fried turkey may be a tasty addition to your meal, cooking with deep-fat turkey fryers can be a recipe for disaster! They have a high risk of tipping over, overheating or spilling hot oil - which can lead to fires, burns and other injuries.

    For a safer alternative to deep-frying your bird, the National Fire Protection Association encourages the use of an outdoor turkey cooking appliance that does not use oil.

    Are you stocked up on Burn First Aid Products? Are you stocked up on Burn First Aid Products?
  • Autumn Burn Safety Update and First Aid Burn Treatment Guide

    Fall means burns.. candles on Halloween, Sparklers (never a good idea,) camping fires, home fires in the hearth, cooking... its a Season fraught with burn peril.

    OK - enough drama. What should one do to treat a burn?

    Burn treatment will depend on the severity of the patient’s burn. First degree burns can typically be treated without professional medical attention. Patients who undergo second, third, and fourth degree burns should seek professional medical burn treatment to ensure adequate recovery and minimize scarring and other burn injury complications. Severe burn patients who do not receive proper treatment may develop infections or other life-threatening complications.

    After a Burn

    Immediately after a burn, victims should take appropriate steps to either treat the burn or prepare and protect the burn until the patient can receive medical attention. Any burns that occur near the eyes should be treated by a professional, regardless of the degree.

    First Degree Burn Treatment

    When a first degree burn occurs, patients should run the burned area under cool water for five to ten minutes, or apply a cool compress to the area. Ice should not be applied as it may increase damage to the area. Butter, oil, egg whites and other “home remedies” should also be avoided.

    Second Degree Burn Treatment

    Second degree burn blisters should not be broken, as this increases the risk of infection. If clothing is stuck to the skin, it should be left intact and removed by a medical professional only. Is possible, the burned area should be elevated above the heart

    Third and Fourth Degree Burn Treatment

    Victims or witnesses should call emergency medical help as soon as possible. Witnesses should check the burn victim to ensure that airways are functioning and that breathing or circulation has not been affected. Clothing stuck to the skin should not be removed. The burn area should be covered with a cool, sterile, and moist bandage or clean cloth until help arrives.

    Also Read: Burns, Burn Safety and Burn First Aid – What to put on a burn & How to treat burns

    Are you stocked up on Burn First Aid Products? Are you stocked up on Burn First Aid Products?

    Burn Care

    When a burn occurs, seconds count. we carry numerous products that are effective, versatile and approved for emergency first aid burn treatment in a pre-hospital setting. They stop the burn progression, cool the burned area, relieve pain and prevent further injury.

  • Types of Burns

    There are different systems used to classify different types of burns. Before treating a burn, it is important to first identify the burn degree, cause of the burn, and scope of the tissue damage resulting from the burn. The main system for classifying types of burns is the degree of the burn, which ranges from first to fourth degree. Types of burns may also be classified by the source of the burn, such as heat, electricity, or radiation.

    Burn Care - When a burn occurs, seconds count. we carry numerous products that are effective, versatile and approved for emergency first aid burn treatment in a pre-hospital setting. They stop the burn progression, cool the burned area, relieve pain and prevent further injury.

    Burn Classification

    The primary way to identify different types of burns is by the degree in which the injury can be categorized. This type of burn classification addresses the layers of skin and tissues in the body. Higher burn degrees are generally labeled by how deeply they penetrate the patient’s skin and tissues.

    First Degree Burn

    A first degree burn is the least severe of the types of burns. First degree burns affect only the epidermis, or the outermost layer of skin. For this reason, these types of burns typically heal quickly without medical attention.

    Second Degree Burn

    A second degree burn is classified as a burn that affects both the epidermis and the dermis, or the second layer of skin. Second degree burns are characterized by intensified swelling, pain, and redness than first degree burns. Deep second degree burns may lead to scarring.

    Third Degree Burn

    Third degree burn injuries penetrate deeper than the dermis to the underlying layer of fat. A third degree burn may appear waxy, stiff, or leathery with a tan or white color. In some cases, third degree burns can cause nerve damage.

    Fourth Degree Burn

    A fourth degree burn injury can be devastating to burn victims. In these types of burns, the damage may penetrate to the muscle or bones. The patient’s skin may be charred or blackened. In some cases, nerve damage may be so severe that the patient does not feel pain in the affected area.

    Sources of Burns

    Burns can be caused by a number of different sources. In cases of minor burns, these sources are most often present in everyday life. Other burn sources can be environmental or found in a specialized workplace such as a manufacturing facility.

    Temperature Burns

    Burns can occur from both excessively hot and excessively cold temperatures. Heat burns most commonly occur from sources such as fire, irons, stoves, hot liquids, and steam. Burns may also occur from cold, such as prolonged exposure to cold, wet, or windy conditions.

    Chemical Burns

    Chemical burns are often caused by industrial or household chemicals that are corrosive and abrasive to the skin. These burns may occur from chemicals in solid, liquid, or gas form. Typically, chemical burns are caused by direct contact with a strong acid or base.

    Electrical Burns

    Electrical burns occur rapidly as electricity passes through the body. Electrical burns are typically more severe, causing more damage to tissue layers beneath the skin. In many cases, the severity of electrical burns are underestimated and underdiagnosed. Severe electrical burns may cause shock or strain to internal organs, including the brain or heart.

    Radiation Burns

    Radiation burns may be caused by UV rays from the sun or tanning booths, x-rays, and certain types of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. Radiation burns may also be caused by radio frequency energy and thermal radiation. The effects of radiation burns depend on the energy of the radiation as well as the intensity of exposure.

    Burn First Aid & Fire Safety Click the image to see great Burn First Aid & Fire Safety
  • Burns

    A burn is an injury to the skin or other organic tissue primarily caused by heat or due to radiation, radioactivity, electricity, friction or contact with chemicals. Skin injuries due to ultraviolet radiation, radioactivity, electricity or chemicals, as well as respiratory damage resulting from smoke inhalation, are also considered to be burns.

    Burn First Aid - What to put on a burn & How to treat burns

    General Information

    • Burns can result from heat (thermal burn), electrical, or exposure to chemicals.
    • The majority of burns should be seen by a doctor. Some first-degree burns, such as mild sun burn, can be treated without doctor care.
    • Never apply home remedies such as butter or baking soda to a burn. Many ointments and home remedies applied topically actually trap the heat, causing further damage to the burned area and can lead to infection.
    • First Aid treatment for burns should focus on keeping the burned area clean, preventing and/or treatment for shock, and pain control.
    • Severe burns (second and third degree burns) often lead to shock. Shock is a life-threatening condition and should be addressed immediately. Call 9-1-1 if you suspect the casualty is experiencing shock.
      • Symptoms of shock include cold, clammy skin, pale or gray skin color, nausea, vomiting, and/or shallow, rapid breathing.

    Burn Treatment

    Severe Thermal Burns

    • Call 9-1-1 or EMS if the burn is severe.
    • Cool the burned area by immersing in cool, clean water for at least 15 minutes.
    • Apply a clean, sterile dressing over the burned area(s) to protect from infection.
    • Keep the casualty calm and still while you wait for EMS to arrive.
    • If possible, elevate the burned area to help prevent swelling and pain, but only do so if it does not cause further discomfort to the casualty.

    Mild Thermal Burns

    • Cool the burned area by immersing in cool, clean water for at least 15 minutes.
    • Do not break blisters or rub skin.
    • Place a dry, sterile dressing over the burn area to keep clean.

    Chemical Burns

    • Call 9-1-1 or EMS immediately.
    • Gently brush away any excess powdered chemicals from the skin, being careful not to get the chemical on you or elsewhere on the casualty. Be especially careful of the eye area.
    • Immediately flush the remaining chemicals off the burned area with copious amounts of running water for at least 15-20 minutes. Use a shower, hose or any available water faucet. Continue to flush with water while carefully removing any clothing from the burned area.
    • Place a clean, sterile dressing over the burn area.
    • Burns from various chemicals require specific first aid care. Check the Material Safety Data Sheet and/or product label for treatment recommendations. Give these MSDS instructions to Emergency Medical Personnel when they arrive.

    Globally, burns are a serious public health problem. An estimated 195 000 deaths occur each year from fires alone, with more deaths from scalds, electrical burns, and other forms of burns, for which global data are not available. Fire-related deaths alone rank among the 15 leading causes of death among children and young adults 5-29 years. Over 95% of fatal fire-related burns occur in low- and middle-income countries. South-East Asia alone accounts for just over one-half of the total number of fire-related deaths worldwide and females in this region have the highest fire-related burn mortality rates globally. Among the various age groups, children under 5 years and the elderly (i.e. those aged over 70 years) have the highest fire-related burn mortality rates. In addition to those who die, millions more are left with lifelong disabilities and disfigurements, often with resulting stigma and rejection.

     Burn Care When a burn occurs, seconds count. we carry numerous products that are effective, versatile and approved for emergency first aid burn treatment in a pre-hospital setting. They stop the burn progression, cool the burned area, relieve pain and prevent further injury.
    Burn Care
    When a burn occurs, seconds count. we carry numerous products that are effective, versatile and approved for emergency first aid burn treatment in a pre-hospital setting. They stop the burn progression, cool the burned area, relieve pain and prevent further injury.

    The suffering caused by burns is even more tragic as burns are so eminently preventable. High-income countries have made considerable progress in lowering rates of burn deaths, through combination of proven prevention strategies and through improvements in the care of burn victims. Most of these advances in prevention and care have been incompletely applied in low- and middle-income countries. Increased efforts to do so would likely lead to significant reductions in rates of burn-related death and disability.

    Burn Care

    When a burn occurs, seconds count. we carry numerous products that are effective, versatile and approved for emergency first aid burn treatment in a pre-hospital setting. They stop the burn progression, cool the burned area, relieve pain and prevent further injury.

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