auto emergency

  • Full of Hot Air

    Fall & Winter Weather brings Driving Danger. Yesterday we discussed the importance of regular tire rotation... Today, even more importantly, we'll discuss tire pressure.

    AAA Digital Tire Gauge

    No matter what Season of the year, remember that tire pressure is one of the most basic points in assuring your vehicle is running in top condition. It's easy because it requires almost no technical skill. Also, when your tires are inflated correctly you get better gas mileage and your tires will last longer. When tires are under inflated they wear faster and unevenly. Tires are designed to be durable in the spots where car puts the most pressure on the tire. This is the center of the tire. When your tire is under inflated, part from the sidewall on your tire starts to reach the ground. These sidewalls are not built for constant contact with the ground. They are produced to withstand a different type of wear.

     

    According to Michelin, tires have been known to lose up to 1psi (pounds per square inch) every month, so check all tires, including your spare, once a month (or before a long trip). It’s easy. Here’s how:

    1. Purchase a trusted tire pressure gauge.
      Tire Gauge - Pencil Type
    2. Check your tires “cold” – before you’ve driven or at least three hours after you’ve driven.
    3. Insert tire pressure gauge into the valve stem on your tire. (If you are using a digital tire gauge like the one pictured, the gauge should begin reading the air pressure immediately. Refer to your air pressure gauge owners manual for correct usage instructions. If using a "pencil" style tire gauge, the gauge will “pop” out and show a measured number. When you hear a “pssst” sound, that’s air escaping the tire. The escaping air shouldn’t affect pressure substantially, unless you hold down the air pressure gauge too long.)
    4. Compare the measured psi to the psi found on the sticker inside the driver’s door of your vehicle or in owner’s manual. DO NOT compare to the psi on your tire’s sidewall.
    5. If your psi is above the number, let air out until it matches. If below, add air (or have a Michelin retailer help you) until it reaches the proper number.

    Low pressure can lead to tire damage.

  • Building an Emergency Kit for the Car

    In addition to encouraging people to build an emergency kit for the home, FEMA encourages building an emergency kit for the car.

    What you should have in an Auto Emergency Kit:

    In case you are stranded, keep a kit of emergency supplies in your car including

    • Jumper cables: might want to include flares or reflective triangle
    • Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits. Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits.

      Flashlights: with extra batteries

    • First Aid Kit: remember any necessary medications, baby formula and diapers if you have a small child
    • Food: non-perishable food such as canned food, and protein rich foods like nuts and energy bars
    • Manual can opener
    • Water: at least 1 gallon of water per person a day for at least 3 days
    • Basic toolkit: pliers, wrench, screwdriver
    • Pet supplies: food and water  
    • Radio: battery or hand cranked
    • Cat litter or sand: for better tire traction
    • Shovel
    • Ice scraper
    • Clothes: warm clothes, gloves, hat, sturdy boots, jacket and an extra change of clothes for the cold
    • Blankets or sleeping bags
    • Charged Cell Phone: and car charger

    The graphic below provides information on what items to include in a car emergency kit in the event that a vehicle becomes stranded.Car-Kit

    You can avoid many dangerous weather problems by planning ahead.  Plan long trips carefully, listening to the radio or television for the latest weather forecasts and road conditions. If bad weather is forecast, drive only if absolutely necessary.

    Check or have a mechanic check the following items on your car:

    • Keep your gas tank full - in case evacuation is needed.
    • Do not drive through a flooded area - Six inches of water can cause a vehicle to lose control and possibly stall. A foot of water will float many cars.
    • Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded - Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car.
    • If a power line falls on your car you are at risk of electrical shock, stay inside until a trained person removes the wire.
    • Antifreeze levels - ensure they are sufficient to avoid freezing.
    • Battery and ignition system - should be in top condition and battery terminals should be clean.
    • Brakes - check for wear and fluid levels.
    • Exhaust system - check for leaks and crimped pipes and repair or replace as necessary. Carbon monoxide is deadly and usually gives no warning.
    • Fuel and air filters - replace and keep water out of the system by using additives and maintaining a full tank of gas. A full tank will keep the fuel line from freezing.
    • Heater and defroster - ensure they work properly.
    • Lights and flashing hazard lights - check for serviceability.
    • Oil - check for level and weight. Heavier oils congeal more at low temperatures and do not lubricate as well.
    • Thermostat - ensure it works properly.
    • Windshield wiper equipment - repair any problems and maintain proper washer fluid level.
    • Install good winter tires - Make sure the tires have adequate tread. All-weather radials are usually adequate for most winter conditions. However, some jurisdictions require that to drive on their roads, vehicles must be equipped with chains or snow tires with studs.

    If there is an explosion or other factor that makes it difficult to control the vehicle, pull over, stop the car and set the parking brake.

    If the emergency could impact the physical stability of the roadway, avoid overpasses, bridges, power lines, signs and other hazards.

  • What do you keep in your car for emergency supplies?

    Everyone has their list - from Road Warriors to AAA Emergency Kits... Winter Driving and Severe Weather Driving Kits to make-your-own emergency kits... What's in your list of Car Emergency Supplies?

    Here are some great suggestions:

    • Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits. Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits.

      Blankets/Sleeping bags/Space blanket

    • Batteries – extra for flashlight/phone etc.
    • Battery charger for phone
    • Car-cell phone charger
    • Card Deck
    • Coffee mug
    • Cold Weather – ice scraper, cat litter, extra cold weather clothes.
    • Cooking pot – to heat food/water
    • DC to AC converter
    • Duct tape
    • Fire Extinguisher
    • Flashlight
    • First aid kit
    • Food – easy open.
    • Full tank of gas
    • Ice scraper
    • Jumper cables
    • Kitchen size trash bags
    • Matches
    • Medications – extra
    • Multi-tool
    • Pen/Paper
    • Rope
    • Shoes – good walking shoes.
    • Shovel
    • Tarp
    • Tire sealant kit
    • Toilet paper
    • Tools
    • Tow strap
    • Utensils
    • Water
    • Tea Candles
    • Heat source for cooking & warming
    • 12v dc air pump

3 Item(s)

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