Health Tips

  • Holiday Season! Be Safe!

    HH-FAM

  • TB

    TB or not TB - great strides are being made against Tuberculosis.

    Get Safety Training Materials on Tuberculosis Get Safety Training Materials on Tuberculosis

    Globally, two billion people are infected with tuberculosis (TB), the world’s leading infectious disease killer.

    TB is deadly and it can also be resistant to antibiotics. Each year, half a million cases across the globe are drug-resistant, meaning the drugs used to treat TB will not kill the bacteria.

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is the deadliest and most dangerous type. It is resistant to at least four of the best anti-TB drugs and has spread worldwide. Now in more than 105 countries worldwide, XDR-TB is at least 20 times costlier to treat and takes more than two years to cure. In most places, less than half of all patients treated are cured, with death rates as high as 80 percent.

    TB continues to spread. - World TB Day: End Tuberculosis - TB may resist, but it can be beaten - TB Threatens to Kill 75 Million People - TB: Know about Tuberculosis - Tuberculosis – TB Safety and Information

    World Tuberculosis Day

    March 24th marks the day in 1882 when German microbiologist Robert Koch announced he had discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes this ancient scourge. Today, in recognition of World TB Day, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), reasserts its commitment to improving our understanding of TB and how to prevent, diagnose and treat it. Around the globe, researchers and the public health community are united in working toward these goals.  TB-Unite to End

  • Healthy Holiday Foods

    Diet - it's an Americanism to consider a "Diet" as a weight loss regimen - as an example, what we call "Diet Soda" most other countries call "Light".

    cornucopiaSo what is a diet? A diet is simply the food and drink regularly provided or consumed... and you can determine if this will be healthful or not.

    A consideration and recommendation of the National Institutes for Health is to plan healthier menu choices this Holiday Season, and to make wiser choices about what you consume, and what you do not.

    In their post " Healthy Holiday Foods and Fun -  Make Smart Choices as You Celebrate the Season " the NIH suggests ideas on how to avoid temptation when delicious foods and calories abound.

    “From Halloween through New Year’s, there’s always a decision to make about food,” says Dr. Marci Gluck, an NIH psychologist who studies obesity and eating behaviors. Tasty treats tend to appear more often at work and festive gatherings, and to come as gifts. They may also tempt you when grocery shopping. “As the holidays approach, it’s important to think ahead and make a plan,” Gluck says.

     

  • Ethnocentrism

    While politics consume media attention, and ethnocentrism makes many shout about US monies spent abroad, consider how much we learn for safety at home from efforts outside our borders.

    Without the work we've done in other countries, we wouldn't have been prepared to deal with scary diseases like Ebola and Zika when they hit our borders. Heck, we might not have seen them coming at all if it weren't for the agencies involved in tracking and fighting disease on a global basis.

    On The Scene: A Commitment to Emergency Response... The CDC’s Division of Global Health Protection is driven a commitment to people, science, response, and systems. Of these, the most important is people. Read personal stories from responders working in extraordinary circumstances in the Center's for Disease Control & Prevention publication Updates from the Field. From setting up surveillance systems in refugee camps, to developing mass immunization campaigns, to improving care for mothers and babies, to evaluating mental health in post-conflict settings, they are on the scene.

  • Record heat

    Heat - it's not just uncomfortable, it is dangerous.. for children and elderly especially, but for workers, too.

    Download OSHA’s heat app to stay safe on the job.

    Heat Safety Tool

    By U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

    When you're working in the heat, safety comes first. With the OSHA Heat Safety Tool, you have vital safety information available whenever and wherever you need it - right on your mobile phone.

    heat_appThe App allows workers and supervisors to calculate the heat index for their worksite, and, based on the heat index, displays a risk level to outdoor workers. Then, with a simple "click," you can get reminders about the protective measures that should be taken at that risk level to protect workers from heat-related illness-reminders about drinking enough fluids, scheduling rest breaks, planning for and knowing what to do in an emergency, adjusting work operations, gradually building up the workload for new workers, training on heat illness signs and symptoms, and monitoring each other for signs and symptoms of heat-related illness.

    Working in full sunlight can increase heat index values by 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep this in mind and plan additional precautions for working in these conditions.

    The OSHA Heat Tool is available in Spanish for Android and iPhone devices. To access the Spanish version on the iPhone, set the phone language setting to Spanish before downloading the app.

    Stay informed and safe in the heat, check your risk level.

    For more information about safety while working in the heat, see OSHA's heat illness webpage, including new online guidance about using the heat index to protect workers.

    ?    Heat & the Elderly
    ?    HEAT
    ?    Death by Heat
    ?    Extreme Heat and Your Health
    ?    Beat the Heat
    ?    Heat Stress – Heat Exhaustion – Heat Stroke
    ?    Heat and Heat Related Injuries and Illness ??
    ?    Heat Stress and Heat Related Injuries – Heat Exhaustion / Heat Stroke

  • Allergy & Flu News

    Vaccine Strategy Induces Antibodies that Can Target Multiple Influenza Viruses...

    Allergy-InstituteScientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. The discovery will help guide development of a universal influenza vaccine, according to investigators. The findings appear in the July 21st online edition of Cell. Learn more & also read: Allergy Treatment & Cough? Cold? Flu? Infection? Pandemic?

    X-ray crystal structure image of one of the newly-identified antibodies X-ray crystal structure image of one of the newly-identified antibodies
  • The #1 risk factor for lung cancer

    According to the Center's for Disease Control & Prevention:

    Quit-SmokingTo learn more about tobacco-related behaviors and disparities among African Americans, read the new supplement in Nicotine & Tobacco Research

  • Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

    extreme-heatNow is the time to prepare for the high temperatures that kill hundreds of people every year. Extreme heat caused 7,415 heat-related deaths in the United States from 1999 to 2010 . Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat.

    Take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated and to keep informed. Getting too hot can make you sick. You can become ill from the heat if your body can't compensate for it and properly cool you off. The main things affecting your body's ability to cool itself during extremely hot weather are:

    • High humidity. When the humidity is high, sweat won't evaporate as quickly, which keeps your body from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.
    • Personal factors. Age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use can play a role in whether a person can cool off enough in very hot weather.
    Mature man wiping sweat from foreheadPeople age 65 and older are at high risk for heat-related illnesses.

    Those who are at highest risk include people 65 and older, children younger than two, and people with chronic diseases or mental illness.  Closely monitor people who depend on you for their care:

    • Are they drinking enough water?
    • Do they have access to air conditioning?
    • Do they need help keeping cool?

    People at greatest risk for heat-related illness can take the following protective actions to prevent illness or death:

    • Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible. Contact your local health department or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area. Air-conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat-related illness and death. If a home is not air-conditioned, people can reduce their risk for heat-related illness by spending time in public facilities that are air-conditioned, and using air conditioning in vehicles.
    • Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device during an extreme heat event.
    • Drink more water than usual and don't wait until you're thirsty to drink.
    • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
    • Don't use the stove or oven to cook—it will make you and your house hotter.

    Even young and healthy people can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather:

    • Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
    • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
    • Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually.
    • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink more. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.
    • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.

    If you participate on a sports team that practices during hot weather protect yourself and look out for your teammates:

    • Schedule workouts and practices earlier or later in the day when the temperature is cooler.
    • Monitor a teammate’s condition, and have someone do the same for you.
    • Seek medical care immediately if you or a teammate has symptoms of heat-related illness.
    • Learn more about how to protect young athletes from heat-related illness by taking this CDC course.
    Young girl sweating and drinking waterDrink plenty of fluids to prevent heat-related illnesses.

    Everyone should take these steps to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths during hot weather:

    • Stay in an air-conditioned indoor location as much as possible.
    • Drink plenty of fluids even if you don't feel thirsty.
    • Schedule outdoor activities carefully.
      • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing and sunscreen.
      • Pace yourself.
    • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
    • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
    • Never leave children or pets in cars.
    • Check the local news for health and safety updates.
  • HEAT

    Preparing for Extreme Heat

    Here at the end of Extreme Heat Week ?? we want to remind you that extreme heat events can happen anywhere in the United States. Extreme heat commonly occurs in the summer; however the main season for heat waves may vary regionally.

    While heat illness may affect seniors and the very young more rapidly, it is a condition to which we are all susceptible.

    • Heat-funnyExtreme Heat Safety Tips:
      Stay indoors, especially during the warmest part of the day (typically 11 am to 2 pm), and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning or it fails, go to a public building with air conditioning such as a shopping mall, public library, or community center.
    •  Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
    •  If you must be outside, protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat (also keeps you cooler) and sunglasses and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher. Avoid strenuous activity. If you must work, take frequent breaks.
    •  NEVER leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle.
    •  Although any one at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on:
      o Infants and young children
      o People aged 65 or older
      o People who have a mental illness
      o Those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure
    •  Get to know symptoms for heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps and sunburn and how to respond immediately.
  • Death by Heat

    Heat is typically the leading cause of weather related fatalities each year. A heat wave is a
    period of abnormally hot and humid weather, generally lasting more than 2 days. Heat waves
    have the potential to cover a large area, exposing a high number of people to a hazardous
    combination of heat and humidity, which can be very taxing on the body. Learn how to stay
    safe during a heat wave at www.weather.gov/heatsafety #HeatSafety

    Heat-stress-collaps

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