CPR

  • There are millions of swimming pools in the United States

    According to the International Aquatic Foundation, there are millions of pools in the United States, most of them residential in nature.

    Swimming Pool & Lifeguard First Aid Kit Swimming Pool & Lifeguard First Aid Kit

    Is your pool safe? Equipped?

    Is someone on hand that knows CPR?

    Do you have an AED nearby?

    • Number of Residential Inground Pools (as of year-end 2004): 4,544,000
    • Number of Residential Aboveground Pools: 3,535,000
    • Number of Residential Hot Tubs: 5,170,000
    • Number of Commercial Swimming Pools: 270,000
    • Percent of Residential Inground Pools with Diving Boards: 35.5%
    • Percent of Residential Inground Pools with Pool Alarms: 7.9%
    • Percent of Residential Inground Pools with Safety Covers: 24.9%
    • Percent of Residential Aboveground Pools with Pool Alarms: 2.8%

    Also read:

     

  • Seeing Red

    March is American Red Cross Month. Now is a good time to familiarize yourself with some of the disaster preparedness tools the Red Cross offers, including a variety of mobile applications (apps). The free apps provide alerts for weather hazards, first aid, shelter, pet first aid, and more.red

    As the winter weather hazards come to an end, you can use the weather-related apps to prepare for spring hazards, such as tornadoes and hurricanes.

    Features of the tornado app include:

    • An audible siren that automatically sounds when the app is closed if a tornado warning is issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA);
    • A notification when the warning expires; and
    • Instructions on what to do if cell phone towers and other communication are down.

    Features of the hurricane app include:

    • One touch “I’m safe” messaging that users can share with family members via social media outlets;
    • Location-based NOAA weather alerts; and
    • Checklists for creating a family emergency plan.

    American_Red_Cross_Slide (1)The Red Cross also offers a mobile application that engages children in disaster preparedness in a fun, exciting way. The “Monster Guard” app uses an interactive game to show kids how to stay safe when responding to emergencies at home.

    Take action today! Download these apps to your tablet or smartphone using the Apple App Store or Android Google Play. Doing so counts as one of the ten ways to participate in America’s PrepareAthon!, so be sure to register your actions on the campaign website.

    Check out these great American Red Cross FIrst Aid Kits! Check out these great American Red Cross FIrst Aid Kits!
  • Official Manikin of the Firefighter Combat Challenge

    Fire Fighters love this thing...

    Rescue Randy was developed for lifelike adult or juvenile victim handling, transportation, and extrication training. These manikins can be safely used in situations too hazardous or uncomfortable for human volunteers. Made of durable vinyl with 4,100 lb. test plastic-coated cables. Features include: articulated joints, weight distribution according to human weight distribution chart. Used by the U.S. Military, Fire, and Police Departments, Safety Teams, and Emergency Personnel for rescue and extrication from pole top, confined spaces, collapsed buildings, smoke rooms, and ladder carry-down protocols worldwide.

    .A.F.F. Rescue Randy (with Additional Reinforcement) 6' 1", 165 lbs. Rescue Randy is the Official Manikin of the Firefighter Combat Challenge: Rescue Randy was developed for lifelike adult or juvenile victim handling, transportation, and extrication training. These manikins can be safely used in situations too hazardous or uncomfortable for human volunteers. Made of durable vinyl with 4,100 lb. test plastic-coated cables. Features include: articulated joints, weight distribution according to human weight distribution chart. Used by the U.S. Military, Fire, and Police Departments, Safety Teams, and Emergency Personnel for rescue and extrication from pole top, confined spaces, collapsed buildings, smoke rooms, and ladder carry-down protocols worldwide. I.A.F.F. Rescue Randy (with Additional Reinforcement) 6' 1", 165 lbs.
    Rescue Randy is the Official Manikin of the Firefighter Combat Challenge:
    Rescue Randy was developed for lifelike adult or juvenile victim handling, transportation, and extrication training. These manikins can be safely used in situations too hazardous or uncomfortable for human volunteers. Made of durable vinyl with 4,100 lb. test plastic-coated cables. Features include: articulated joints, weight distribution according to human weight distribution chart. Used by the U.S. Military, Fire, and Police Departments, Safety Teams, and Emergency Personnel for rescue and extrication from pole top, confined spaces, collapsed buildings, smoke rooms, and ladder carry-down protocols worldwide.

     

  • 1 out of 3 Women die of a Broken Heart

    healthyheartHeart disease and stroke kill 1 in 3 women, but it's 80 percent preventable.

    Make sure you're doing everything you can to avoid heart disease by ordering these free publications to keep your heart healthy. You will:

    • Discover the surprising signs of heart attack in women
    • Understand the difference between “good” and “bad” cholesterol
    • Learn 10 easy ways to cut sodium in your diet
    • during National Heart Month by ordering a set of free publications that can help you:
      • Discover the surprising signs of heart attack in women
      • Understand the difference between “good” and “bad” cholesterol
      • Learn 10 easy ways to cut sodium in your diet

    During National Heart Month by ordering a set of free publications that can help you.

    You can also see them online:

  • Hard & Fast

    Very clever bit from the British Heart Foundation: Vinnie Jones shows how hard and fast Hands-only CPR to Stayin' Alive by the Bee Gees can help save the life of someone who has had a cardiac arrest. The Hollywood hardman is starring in a British Heart Foundation TV advert urging more people to carry out CPR in a medical emergency.

    It all applies here in the USA as well, except, of course, dial 911 not 999. L Earn more about Compression-Only CPR and Full CPR at American CPR or Learn CPR at Home

    CPR-AED-BANNER

  • You are a smoker.

    It should be no surprise to most people that smoking is bad for your health. Most people are aware of lung cancer and emphysema, but you should be aware that smoking is one of the leading causes of heart attacks as well. Cigarette smoke contains chemicals which, Ciggieswhen ignited and inhaled, affect the body’s lungs, circulatory system, and ultimately the heart itself. One of these chemicals is nicotine.  Nicotine is highly addictive; it’s the stuff that keeps you coming back for more.  But it’s also a vasoconstrictor, which means it tightens the walls of the blood vessels.  In the case of smaller blood vessels, nicotine may constrict them to the point of complete occlusion, and the largest collection of these small blood vessels in your body is the neural network of your brain. Upon inhalation, nicotine enters the bloodstream and begins constricting blood vessels. This may even create the temporary light-headed sensation associated with asphyxiation.

    Even worse than nicotine, however, is a chemical asphyxiant known as Carbon Monoxide (CO). CO is the same stuff that comes out of the tailpipe of a car, and it is an extremely dangerous chemical.  CO attacks the red blood cells of your body, robbing them of the oxygen you have already breathed in.  Every cell in your body needs oxygen in order to survive.  Red Blood Cells (RBC) are like a bus that delivers the oxygen.  There are receptor sites on the RBC called hemoglobin, which are like seats on the bus.  When the RBC’s arrive at the lungs, they are surrounded by oxygen, and if an oxygen molecule bumps up against the hemoglobin, it will become attached.  Ultimately, a healthy RBC will have all of its “seats” filled with oxygen.  Unfortunately, hemoglobin also likes to attach to CO.  In fact, it has a 250 times greater affinity for CO than for oxygen, and CO will push the oxygen out of its way to take its spot on the RBC.  This means that moments after cigarette smoke enters the lungs, millions of RBC’s are becoming depleted of the very oxygen than they’re designed to carry.  When these RBC’s circulate through the body, they begin to run out of oxygen prematurely.  Cold fingers and toes are just some of the symptoms of a condition known as “Peripheral Vascular Disease.”  These areas become cold because the circulatory system has begun to shut down as the cells begin to die.

    Another hazard of smoking (and chewing tobacco) is the creation of blood clots.  With the introduction of these various chemicals into the bloodstream, the RBCs begin to clump together forming what’s known as a thrombus.  If this thrombus begins moving through the bloodstream, it is called an embolus. An embolus that becomes lodged in a smaller blood vessel, blocking the blood flow to an area of the body is called an embolism, and is just about the most dangerous thing you can have in your body.  These blood clots can escape the scrutiny of an x-ray, and you may never even know they exist until one becomes lodged in an artery leading to the heart (causing heart attack) or the brain (causing a stroke). They can happen at any time, with no warning, and at any age.

    According to the CDC: 58 million nonsmokers in US are still exposed to secondhand smoke

    Although secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in the United States dropped by half between 1999 to 2000 and 2011 to 2012, one in four nonsmokers -- 58 million people -- are still exposed to SHS, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) show that declines in exposure to SHS have been slower and exposure remains higher among children, blacks, those who live in poverty, and those who live in rental housing. The report finds two in every five children aged three to 11 years are still exposed to SHS. The study assessed exposure using cotinine, a marker of SHS found in the blood.

    Read More>> smoking

  • February is American Heart Month

    Heart MonthOne in three American adults has high blood pressure. Million Hearts® offers new resources to Help Make Control Your Goal.

    http://millionhearts.hhs.gov/newsevents/heartmonth.html

  • Heart Month

    February is Heart Month. This National event involves hundreds of organizations in raising awareness of heart disease, heart health, and prevention of death by sudden cardiac arrest and other heart-related illnesses.

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease. While traditionally, we think of heart attack and heart disease as a male issue, it is the number one killer for both men and women.

    Do you know CPR?

    Not only is it important to consider that 80% of bystander CPR is performed on family members (therefor learning CPR likely means you'll be ready to save the life of a loved one) - but good CPR training also teaches about heart health and lifestyle changes that can help avoid heart disease and stroke, as well as a basic physiology of the heart and lungs - which will help you make better decisions for healthy living and avoiding SCA,

    Make it your goal to learn CPR, renew or refresh your cpr, or better yet, schedule a group cpr training at your location during National Heart Month!

    Highlights of an American CPR Training class curriculum:

    C.A.R.E. CPR™ Curriculum
    Introduction to C.A.R.E. CPR™
    Brain begins to die within 4 - 6 Minutes
    An introduction to CPR – Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation; how it works and why it’s so important. Included will be a brief discussion on the physiology of the heart and lungs and understanding the difference between Clinical and Biological Death.
    Adult C.A.R.E. CPR™ Includes Introduction to AED (Ages 8 years and older)
    Adult C.A.R.E. CPR (Ages 8 years and older)

    Included in this section is a step by step approach on what to do for an Adult cardiac emergency, calling 911, and a comprehensive description and demonstration section on how to perform CPR for the Adult age group. A brief introduction to the AED (Automated External Defibrillator), the importance of this life-saving device and how to operate one is also included in this section.

    Compression-Only CPR™
    Don't Stress... Compress!

    Discussion on the difference between Compression-Only CPR™ and traditional CPR will be a part of this section, current research findings, as well as when Compression-Only CPR™ is most appropriate.

    *** The Recovery Position; when and how to use it and Rescue Breathing is also covered in this section. ***

    Cardiovascular Disease
    Cardiovascular Disease
    Cardiovascular Disease is our number one killer. The major risk factors for this disease will be covered, as well as activities that can help decrease the chances of having a heart attack. One of the most important lessons for this course is included in this section: The Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack and Stroke and how to assist in each situation.
    Choking ~ Airway Obstructions
    Choking ~ Airway Obstructions

    Recognizing the Signs and Symptoms of Choking, varying levels of choking and their respective treatment, and obtaining consent will be discussed.

    Adult Conscious Choking
    Adult Conscious Choking

    Demonstration of the specific techniques used to assist an conscious Adult will be covered. Adult Abdominal Thrusts (Heimlich Maneuver) will be demonstrated and practiced. This segment will also include information on what to do if you are alone and choking.

    Adult Unconscious Choking
    Adult Unconscious Choking
    Demonstration of the specific techniques used to assist an unconscious Adult will be covered as well as instruction on keeping the airway open and removing visible obstructions.
    Child C.A.R.E. CPR™ (Ages 1- 8 years old)
    Child C.A.R.E. CPR™ (Ages 1- 8 years old)

    Included in this section is a step by step approach on what to do for a Child cardiac emergency, when to call 911 and when to give care first, and a comprehensive description and demonstration section on how to perform CPR for the Child age group. Special considerations for Children will be covered in this section.

    Child Conscious Choking
    Child Conscious Choking
     Recognizing the Signs and Symptoms of Choking for a Child, the varying levels of choking and their respective treatment, and obtaining consent for children will be discussed. Child Abdominal Thrusts (Heimlich Maneuver) will be demonstrated and practiced.
    Child Unconscious Choking
    Child Unconscious Choking

    Demonstration of the specific techniques used to assist an unconscious Child choking will be covered, as well as when to give care first and when to call 911. Instruction on keeping the airway open and removing visible obstructions will be demonstrated as well.

    Infant C.A.R.E. CPR™
    Infant C.A.R.E. CPR™

    Included in this section is a step by step approach on what to do for an Infant cardiac emergency, when to call 911 and when to give care first, and a comprehensive description and demonstration section on how to perform CPR for the Infant age group. Special considerations for Infants will be covered in this section.

    Infant Conscious Choking
    Infant Conscious Choking

    Recognizing when an Infant is choking, how to administer back blows and chest thrusts, and what steps to take if the obstruction is not removed will be discussed and demonstrated in this section.

    Infant Unconscious Choking
    Infant Unconscious Choking

    Demonstration of the specific techniques used to assist an unconscious Infant who is choking will be covered, as well as when to give care first and when to call 911. Instruction on keeping the airway open and removing visible obstructions will be demonstrated as well. Special considerations for Infants will be covered as well.

    A.B.C. versus C.A.R.E. ~ How and why CPR has Changed?
    A.B.C. versus C.A.R.E. ~ How and why CPR has Changed?
    The research and studies behind the most significant change in CPR in over 40 years will be discussed as well as an emphasis on the biggest changes.
    Good Samaritan Laws and Legal Considerations
    Good Samaritan Laws and Legal Considerations

    This sections covers why the Good Samaritan Act was created and the legal responsibilities and guidelines to follow to protect you from legal action if assistance is given to a casualty.

    C.A.R.E. CPR™ Quiz?

    This 15 question quiz is used for learning purposes only, to allow the class participants and the instructor the opportunity to clarify any sections or topics that are unclear or need a little more explanation. It is not a graded test.

    Question & Answer Session
    An open forum of Questions and Answers will be available throughout the course, but the instructor will give the class another opportunity to ask questions before they begin the hands-on practice section of the course.
    C.A.R.E. CPR™ Skill Practice
    Good Samaritan Laws and Legal Considerations

    One of the most important goals of this course is to have each participant come away from this training with the confidence and competence to actually perform these skills in an emergency situation. Hands-on practice is one of the most important elements in retention and self-confidence.

    Each class participant will be given the opportunity to practice the CPR and Airway Obstruction skills they learned about during the class. Each participant will be given their own barrier mask and gloves to protect them from infectious disease. Each person will need to practice the CPR skills demonstrated to receive a certification card. If for any reason they are unable to perform the steps, they may verbally go through the practice steps.

    CPR & AED

  • Are there levels of Death? Yes.

    Clinical Death/ Biological Death

    What happens when an individual’s breathing and heartbeat stop? The first stage is called Clinical Death.  Clinical death is not necessarily permanent. An individual’s brain can stay alive for about 4-6 minutes after breathing and heartbeat have stopped.  This isn’t much time, but it is our “Window of Survival.” If appropriate medical care is initiated within the first minutes of cardiac arrest, the individual has a much greater chance of survival. Many individuals have survived because of early entry into the Emergency Medical System (EMS), and prompt bystander CPR and Defibrillation. If more than 4-6 minutes elapse, however, the individual will most likely experience permanent and irreversible brain damage or Biological Death.

    HeartLearn CPR! Bet a CPR Home Learning Kit, or Get a Quote for CPR, First Aid & AED training at your location for your group!

  • Children and Lifesaving

    Children are learning CPR in Schools. This is a good thing. Everyone should know CPR.

    CPR-AED-BANNERAre you giving junk to your Friends and Family for Christmas? Most are. Do something better... schedule a group CPR & First Aid training at your home, work, school, church or other gathering place.

    Cardiac Arrest is a leading cause of death in the U.S., but when ordinary people, not just doctors and EMS, know CPR, a victim’s survival rate can double, or even triple. Schools are adding thousands of lifesavers to our communities by training their students, faculty and staff in CPR. In fact, laws in more than ten states require CPR training for high school graduation, and more states are joining the movement.

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