Automated External Defibrillators (AED)

  • Challenge to control your blood pressure!

    Of course High Blood Pressure is one of the leading causes of Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes. but you CAN control it!

    Million Hearts launches annual blood pressure control challenge

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today launched an annual challenge designed to identify and honor clinicians and health care teams that have helped their patients control high blood pressure and prevent heart attacks and strokes.Million-Hearts

     

    The Million Hearts Hypertension Control Challenge recognizes exemplary public and private practices and providers that achieve sustained hypertension control rates of 70 percent or above. The challenge was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in support of Million Hearts, an HHS initiative aimed at preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

     

    "Many heart attacks and strokes -- and needless early deaths -- can be prevented if we get better control of high blood pressure,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “We applaud the many medical practices which have made hypertension control a daily priority with all of their patients. We look forward to recognizing their achievements and learning from top performing practices.”

     

    Nearly one in three U.S. adults – or about 70 million people – has high blood pressure. Of that group, only about half has it under control. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, two of the leading causes of death nationwide. In 2013, high blood pressure was a primary or contributing cause of death for more than 360,000 Americans – that is nearly 1,000 deaths each day.

     

    Blood pressure management, a key strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease, is strongly emphasized by Million Hearts. Since 2012, Million Hearts has recognized 41 Champions that care for 12 million patients from small and large, urban and rural, and private, federal, and tribal health practices and systems. Past winners have used a variety of evidence-based strategies including hypertension treatment protocols, self-measured blood pressure monitoring, health information technology, and team-based care.

     

    “A growing number of public and private practices and systems are using evidence-based strategies to detect, connect and control high blood pressure,” said Janet S. Wright, M.D., F.A.C.C., executive director of Million Hearts. “This challenge is a way to find and celebrate these high performers and help others replicate their success. By excelling in hypertension control, Champions are helping prevent events and improving heart health across the country.”

     

    To enter the challenge, applicants must provide information about their practice, share verifiable high blood pressure control data, and describe how use of health information technology contributed to their success. Examples could include electronic health records, incentives for providers and patients, team-based care, and community involvement. The deadline to submit a nomination is before midnight on Oct. 31, 2015.

    For more information about the Hypertension Challenge, previous winners or to access resources, visit http://millionhearts.hhs.gov.

     

    About Million Hearts Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.  Million Hearts brings together communities, health systems, nonprofit organizations, federal agencies, and private-sector partners from across the country to fight heart disease and stroke.

     

    Learn More>>

     

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    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

     

    CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

  • Stroke: What is YOUR risk?

    Risk of Stroke, whether TIA (Transient Ischemic Attack*) or full Cerebro Vascular Attacks varies by heredity, lifestyle, and other factors, but trends exist, and knowing your non-controllable risks can help you determine the importance of watching the controllable risk factors.

    What is little known is that across all ethnicities, about 20% of strokes occur under the age of 20!

    *TIA: A brief stroke-like attack that, despite resolving within minutes to hours, still requires immediate medical attention to distinguish from an actual stroke.

    Stroke deaths, by age group and race and Hispanic origin: average annual, 2010–2013:

    Stroke by Age

    The age distribution of stroke deaths varied by race and Hispanic origin during 2010–2013.

    • More than one-fourth of the stroke deaths among non-Hispanic black persons aged 45 and over (28.6%) occurred to those in the youngest age group (45–64.) By contrast, the portion of stroke deaths in this age group among the other race?ethnicity groups ranged from one-tenth among non-Hispanic white persons (10.0%) to less than one-fourth among Hispanic persons (22.4%).

    Learn how to prevent stroke:

    Stroke mortality among adults aged 45 and over varied by race and Hispanic origin and sex during 2010–2013.

    • The age-adjusted stroke death rate for non-Hispanic black men aged 45 and over (154.8 deaths per 100,000 population) was 54% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white men, 67% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander men, and 68% higher than the rate for Hispanic men of the same age.
    • The rate for non-Hispanic black women (131.4 per 100,000 population) was 30% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white women, 58% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander women, and 61% higher than the rate for Hispanic women of the same age.
    • Non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic men and women had the lowest
      age-adjusted stroke death rates (men: 92.8 and 91.9 per 100,000 population; women: 83.0 and 81.6).
    • Non-Hispanic white men and women aged 45 and over had similar age-adjusted stroke death rates (100.7 and 101.1 deaths per 100,000 population). Men in the other race-ethnicity groups had higher age-adjusted stroke death rates than women of the same race and ethnicity (12% to 18% higher).

    Age-adjusted stroke death rates among men and women aged 45 and over, by race and Hispanic origin: average annual, 2010–2013:

    Hispanic Stroke

    Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality

    • During 2010–2013, the age-adjusted stroke death rate for non-Hispanic black men aged 45 and over (154.8 deaths per 100,000 population) was 54% to 68% higher than the rates for men of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups. The rate for non-Hispanic black women aged 45 and over was 30% to 61% higher than the rates for women of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups.
    • The age distribution of stroke deaths differed by race and ethnicity.
    • Stroke death rates were 32% higher in counties in the lowest median household income quartile than in counties in the highest income quartile.
    • Nonmetropolitan counties had higher stroke death rates than counties at other urbanization levels.
    • Stroke mortality inside and outside the Stroke Belt differed by race and ethnicity.

    Despite steady decreases in U.S. stroke mortality over the past several decades, stroke remained the fourth leading cause of death during 2010–2012 and the fifth leading cause in 2013. Most studies have focused on the excess mortality experienced by black persons compared with white persons and by residents of the southeastern states, referred to as the Stroke Belt. Few stroke mortality studies have focused on Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic persons or have explored urban–rural differences. This report provides updated information about stroke mortality among U.S. residents aged 45 and over during 2010–2013 by age, race and ethnicity, income, urban–rural residence, and residence inside or outside the Stroke Belt. Learn more

  • Medical and Health Apps and AEDs under FDA surveillance

    With the flood of "Health Apps" on the market, and rapid increase in OTC medical devices (AEDs for one) leading to perhaps-lesser-quality-assurance, the FDA is ramping up its after-market performance scrutiny.

    According to the FDA:

    Despite rigorous premarket evaluation, what really counts is how well a medical device works when it’s used day-to-day by patients, caregivers and clinicians. Beyond clinical trials, real-life patient experience may reveal unanticipated device risks and confirm long-term benefits. Similar to other medical products such as drugs or vaccines, medical devices offer vital, sometimes life-saving, benefits, but they must be balanced against certain risks. A strong postmarket surveillance system can provide more robust and timely benefit-risk profiles for devices so that providers and patients can make better informed health care decisions.

    Medicine doctor pushing on first aid sign with modern computer interface Medicine doctor pushing on first aid sign with modern computer interface

    Learn more at the FDA

    Also read:

  • Life and Death during CPR and AED Awareness Week

    Do you know anyone saved by CPR or due to an AED being on hand? Do you know of anyone lost because no AED was available and/or nobody on hand knew CPR?CPR-AED-BANNER

    Thousands of lives are saved each year through bystander CPR and quick action through AED use.

    Take action now during CPR and AED Awareness Week - you need not teach everyone CPR Today, but there are things you CAN do now.

  • This week is about Life 🏥

    CPR & AED Awareness Week 2015...

    Is your CPR Certification current? Do you have an AED at work, at home, at your group meeting places?

    Learn more about CPR & AED Awareness.

    CPR&AED_AwarenessWeek

  • ? CPR and AED Awareness Week ?

    CPR and AED Awareness Week is right around the corner.

    In 2008, Congress designated the first week of June for observation of National CPR / AED Awareness Week, with the goal of encouraging all states, cities and towns to establish organized programs which provide CPR and AED training to the public.

    At American CPR Training™ they realize that not everyone can arrange a class or promote CPR & AED Awareness the first week (especially with Memorial Day cutting into this week) so they have made it their policy since 2008 to promote CPR & AED Awareness Month.

    We carry a large selection of CPR products including Professional CPR & First Aid Training Mannequins, CPR Masks & CPR Mouth Barrier devices, CPR Kits, CPR Prompting devices, Safety Training Videos, CD's and More. We carry a large selection of CPR products including Professional CPR & First Aid Training Mannequins, CPR Masks & CPR Mouth Barrier devices, CPR Kits, CPR Prompting devices, Safety Training Videos, CD's and More.

    Do something for your gropu to recognize CPR & AED Awareness Week, or Month!

    Something... Anything. Plan Now.

    More:

     

     

  • There are millions of swimming pools in the United States

    According to the International Aquatic Foundation, there are millions of pools in the United States, most of them residential in nature.

    Swimming Pool & Lifeguard First Aid Kit Swimming Pool & Lifeguard First Aid Kit

    Is your pool safe? Equipped?

    Is someone on hand that knows CPR?

    Do you have an AED nearby?

    • Number of Residential Inground Pools (as of year-end 2004): 4,544,000
    • Number of Residential Aboveground Pools: 3,535,000
    • Number of Residential Hot Tubs: 5,170,000
    • Number of Commercial Swimming Pools: 270,000
    • Percent of Residential Inground Pools with Diving Boards: 35.5%
    • Percent of Residential Inground Pools with Pool Alarms: 7.9%
    • Percent of Residential Inground Pools with Safety Covers: 24.9%
    • Percent of Residential Aboveground Pools with Pool Alarms: 2.8%

    Also read:

     

  • Seeing Red

    March is American Red Cross Month. Now is a good time to familiarize yourself with some of the disaster preparedness tools the Red Cross offers, including a variety of mobile applications (apps). The free apps provide alerts for weather hazards, first aid, shelter, pet first aid, and more.red

    As the winter weather hazards come to an end, you can use the weather-related apps to prepare for spring hazards, such as tornadoes and hurricanes.

    Features of the tornado app include:

    • An audible siren that automatically sounds when the app is closed if a tornado warning is issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA);
    • A notification when the warning expires; and
    • Instructions on what to do if cell phone towers and other communication are down.

    Features of the hurricane app include:

    • One touch “I’m safe” messaging that users can share with family members via social media outlets;
    • Location-based NOAA weather alerts; and
    • Checklists for creating a family emergency plan.

    American_Red_Cross_Slide (1)The Red Cross also offers a mobile application that engages children in disaster preparedness in a fun, exciting way. The “Monster Guard” app uses an interactive game to show kids how to stay safe when responding to emergencies at home.

    Take action today! Download these apps to your tablet or smartphone using the Apple App Store or Android Google Play. Doing so counts as one of the ten ways to participate in America’s PrepareAthon!, so be sure to register your actions on the campaign website.

    Check out these great American Red Cross FIrst Aid Kits! Check out these great American Red Cross FIrst Aid Kits!
  • Official Manikin of the Firefighter Combat Challenge

    Fire Fighters love this thing...

    Rescue Randy was developed for lifelike adult or juvenile victim handling, transportation, and extrication training. These manikins can be safely used in situations too hazardous or uncomfortable for human volunteers. Made of durable vinyl with 4,100 lb. test plastic-coated cables. Features include: articulated joints, weight distribution according to human weight distribution chart. Used by the U.S. Military, Fire, and Police Departments, Safety Teams, and Emergency Personnel for rescue and extrication from pole top, confined spaces, collapsed buildings, smoke rooms, and ladder carry-down protocols worldwide.

    .A.F.F. Rescue Randy (with Additional Reinforcement) 6' 1", 165 lbs. Rescue Randy is the Official Manikin of the Firefighter Combat Challenge: Rescue Randy was developed for lifelike adult or juvenile victim handling, transportation, and extrication training. These manikins can be safely used in situations too hazardous or uncomfortable for human volunteers. Made of durable vinyl with 4,100 lb. test plastic-coated cables. Features include: articulated joints, weight distribution according to human weight distribution chart. Used by the U.S. Military, Fire, and Police Departments, Safety Teams, and Emergency Personnel for rescue and extrication from pole top, confined spaces, collapsed buildings, smoke rooms, and ladder carry-down protocols worldwide. I.A.F.F. Rescue Randy (with Additional Reinforcement) 6' 1", 165 lbs.
    Rescue Randy is the Official Manikin of the Firefighter Combat Challenge:
    Rescue Randy was developed for lifelike adult or juvenile victim handling, transportation, and extrication training. These manikins can be safely used in situations too hazardous or uncomfortable for human volunteers. Made of durable vinyl with 4,100 lb. test plastic-coated cables. Features include: articulated joints, weight distribution according to human weight distribution chart. Used by the U.S. Military, Fire, and Police Departments, Safety Teams, and Emergency Personnel for rescue and extrication from pole top, confined spaces, collapsed buildings, smoke rooms, and ladder carry-down protocols worldwide.

     

  • 1 out of 3 Women die of a Broken Heart

    healthyheartHeart disease and stroke kill 1 in 3 women, but it's 80 percent preventable.

    Make sure you're doing everything you can to avoid heart disease by ordering these free publications to keep your heart healthy. You will:

    • Discover the surprising signs of heart attack in women
    • Understand the difference between “good” and “bad” cholesterol
    • Learn 10 easy ways to cut sodium in your diet
    • during National Heart Month by ordering a set of free publications that can help you:
      • Discover the surprising signs of heart attack in women
      • Understand the difference between “good” and “bad” cholesterol
      • Learn 10 easy ways to cut sodium in your diet

    During National Heart Month by ordering a set of free publications that can help you.

    You can also see them online:

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