Monthly Archives: May 2016

  • Memorial Day 2016

    HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY

    Memorial-Day

    Learn about Memorial Day: US Memorial Day Org

  • Picnic

    Have a Holiday weekend Picnic?

    Remember to use sunscreen, watch out for burns around the grill or campfire, and keep those pesky bugs away!

    Here is some helpful reading on these subjects:

    grilling

  • HEAT

    Preparing for Extreme Heat

    Here at the end of Extreme Heat Week ?? we want to remind you that extreme heat events can happen anywhere in the United States. Extreme heat commonly occurs in the summer; however the main season for heat waves may vary regionally.

    While heat illness may affect seniors and the very young more rapidly, it is a condition to which we are all susceptible.

    • Heat-funnyExtreme Heat Safety Tips:
      Stay indoors, especially during the warmest part of the day (typically 11 am to 2 pm), and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning or it fails, go to a public building with air conditioning such as a shopping mall, public library, or community center.
    •  Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
    •  If you must be outside, protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat (also keeps you cooler) and sunglasses and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher. Avoid strenuous activity. If you must work, take frequent breaks.
    •  NEVER leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle.
    •  Although any one at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on:
      o Infants and young children
      o People aged 65 or older
      o People who have a mental illness
      o Those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure
    •  Get to know symptoms for heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps and sunburn and how to respond immediately.
  • Death by Heat

    Heat is typically the leading cause of weather related fatalities each year. A heat wave is a
    period of abnormally hot and humid weather, generally lasting more than 2 days. Heat waves
    have the potential to cover a large area, exposing a high number of people to a hazardous
    combination of heat and humidity, which can be very taxing on the body. Learn how to stay
    safe during a heat wave at www.weather.gov/heatsafety #HeatSafety

    Heat-stress-collaps

  • Stay safe this Summer

    Know Your Risk, Take Action and Be a Force of Nature.

    Protect yourself from the heat while working or playing outside this summer. Drink plenty of
    water to stay hydrated and apply sunscreen regularly. Also, dress in lightweight and light
    colored clothing and wear a wide brimmed hat.

    1. Know Your Risk
    noaa_logoBeing prepared means learning about summer weather hazards such as hurricanes, heat, lightning, rip currents, air quality and wildfires. Here’s what you need to know:

    • The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30. Hurricane hazards come in many forms, including storm surge, heavy rainfall, inland flooding, high winds, tornadoes, and rip currents.
    • Since 2003, 43 states within the continental United States have come under a tornado watch; 49 states have come under severe thunderstorm watches; and lightning strikes occur in every state.
    • Heat waves are common across the country during the summer. They are dangerous because the human body cannot cool itself properly when exposed to an extreme combination of heat and humidity.
    • In 2014, there were 26 lightning fatalities - six in Florida alone.
    • The United States Lifesaving Association estimates that more than 100 people each year die in the surf zone waters of the U.S. and that rip currents cause the majority of those fatalities. Rip currents are just one of many beach hazards.
    • Wildfires kill 30 people, destroy 2,800 homes and burn more than 7 million acres, on average, per year.
    • Flash flooding is the number one killer associated with severe weather.
    • Air pollution can make it harder for people with asthma and other respiratory diseases to breathe. Children and teens may be more sensitive than adults to the health effects caused by air pollution. According to the EPA, poor air quality is responsible in the U.S. for an estimated 60,000 premature deaths each year.

    2. Take Action
    While the weather may be wild, you are not powerless. Prepare for summer hazards with these simple steps:

    • WRN-AmbassadorDo you live in a hurricane evacuation zone? If so, you need to plan on where you and your family would ride out the storm if you are told to evacuate.
    • You may have only minutes to find shelter before a tornado strikes. Practice a family tornado drill at least once a year.
    • Protect yourself from extreme heat by rescheduling outdoor activities to earlier in the day.
    • There is no safe place outside when lightning is in the area. If you hear thunder, you are likely within striking distance of the storm. Just remember, When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors.
    • Stay safe from rip currents and other beach hazards by only swimming at a beach with lifeguards and heed their direction. Learn how to survive a rip current.
    • If you live near wildland areas, make sure your home is Firewise and fire-safe. Also determine evacuation routes from your home. Visit weather.gov to determine if your area is at risk for dangerous fire weather conditions.
    • Whether on foot or in a car, if you encounter flood waters, Turn Around Don’t Drown!
    • Make sure to check the Air Quality Index for your area at http://airquality.weather.gov or http://airnow.gov. If the air quality is poor, avoid prolonged or extreme exertion outdoors.

    3. Be a Force of Nature
    Your action can inspire others. Be a Force of Nature and share how you’re working to stay safe from weather hazards this summer.

    • Write a post on Facebook. Share with your friends and family the preparedness steps you’re taking to stay safe this summer.
    • Tweet that you’re prepared with #SummerSafety. Tell us what you’re doing to be prepared for summer hazards.
    • Create a Family Communication Plan so that your loved ones know how to get in touch during an emergency. And let your friends know that they should create a plan also.
    • Look for ways to help your town prepare, such as volunteering Community Emergency Response Team.
    • Register for America’s PrepareAthon! to learn how to stay safe during disasters.

    With these steps, you’ll be doing more than just protecting yourself - you’ll help NOAA build a Weather-Ready Nation.

    Get to Know NOAA
    NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS) provides weather, water and climate data and forecasts and warnings to protect life and property and enhance the national economy. Our vision is a Weather-Ready Nation, one that is prepared for and responds to weather-dependent events. Here’s what we’re doing to prepare the public for summer weather hazards.

    • NWS leads Seasonal Safety Campaigns (like this one) to prepare the public for seasonal weather hazards.
    • NOAA issues a Hurricane Outlook as general guide to the expected overall activity during the upcoming hurricane season. In addition, NWS will begin issuing a prototype Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic in 2015 to highlight those areas along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of the United States that have a significant risk of life-threatening inundation by storm surge from a tropical cyclone.
    • NWS warns the public about severe weather through Wireless Emergency Alerts and NOAA Weather Radio.
    • NOAA, EPA and other federal agencies created an Excessive Heat Events Guidebook to help emergency managers prepare for heat waves.
    • NWS offices issue Surf Zone Forecasts routinely to let people know of the expected conditions at a particular beach; including a daily outlook for rip current potential.
    • NOAA and the National Weather Service, in partnership with the EPA, issues daily air quality forecast guidance as part of a national Air Quality Forecasting Capability.
    • NOAA issues Fire Weather Outlooks to help local officials prepare for potential wildfires.

    Safety Information for Workers and Employers
    NOAA-Weather-RadioThe Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provides resources for workplace preparedness and response to severe weather emergencies during summer, including: extreme heat, hurricanes, wildfires and floods. Employers must ensure that workers involved in response and recovery are protected from potential safety and health hazards. OSHA also provides information and resources to assist in these efforts.

    OSHA and NOAA encourage workers and employers to be aware of weather forecasts, train workers on severe weather plans, and keep emergency supplies, including a battery-operated weather radio, on hand to be better prepared when severe weather strikes.

  • Is a Heat Wave Coming?

    Probably. As the NOAA explains, North American summers are hot; most summers see heat waves in one or more parts of the United States. Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year and even more heat-related illnesses.

    What can you do? During Extreme Heat Week, we remind you that taking precautions is far easier than treating Heat Stress and Heat Related Injuries. While The First Day of Summer (Summer Solstice) in 2016 is June 20, this is  just a date on the calendar - Meteorological Summer (real summer weather-wise) is about to  begin on June 1st. Things will heat up, so play and work safe - plan your activities for early and late hours when it is cooler, and stay indoors or in the shade during the hottest mid-day hours.

    Remember that Summer also holds significant weather hazards. Heat waves can be lengthy and deadly. Lightning deaths are at their peak during the summer. Beach hazards such as rip currents can catch the unprepared. And, it’s the start of hurricane season.Blazing

  • Look Before You Lock

    Extreme Heat creates dangers for all ages, from Heat and Heat Related Injuries and Illness to death. While we often focus on safety working in the heat, and staying hydrated, it's not all about adults and electrolytes... During Extreme Heat Week, we want to remind you that pets and children die when left in cars every year... Look Before You Lock!

    heat-graphic

    Sweating? ??

    Each year, dozens of children and untold numbers of pets left in parked vehicles die from hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is an acute condition that occurs when the body absorbs more heat than it can handle. Hyperthermia can occur even on a mild day. Studies have shown that the temperature inside a parked vehicle can rapidly rise to a dangerous level for children, pets and even adults. Leaving the windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate. The effects can be more severe on children because their bodies have not developed the ability to efficiently regulate its internal temperature.

    The sun's shortwave radiation (yellow in figure below) heats objects that it strikes.  For example, a dark dashboard or seat can easily reach temperatures in the range of 180 to over 200°F. These objects (e.g., dashboard, steering wheel, child seat) heat the adjacent air by conduction and convection and also give off longwave radiation (red in figure below) which is very efficient at warming the air trapped inside a vehicle. Shown below are time lapse photos of thermometer readings in a car over a period of less than an hour. As the animation shows, in just over 2 minutes the car went from a safe temperature to an unsafe temperature of 94.3°F. This demonstration shows just how quickly a vehicle can become a death trap for a child.

    Objects Heated by the Sun Warm Vehicle's Air

    parked vehicle
    CLICK HERE FOR ANIMATION (700K)
    ( Hi-Res ~ 2.5 mb.WMV file)
    Individual Frames:
    0 min, 10 min, 20 min, 30 min, 40 min, 50 min, 60 min
    Animation Courtesy of General Motors and San Francisco State University. Use of this animation does not imply NWS endorsement of services provided by General Motors and San Francisco State University.

    Hyperthermia deaths aren't confined to summer months. They also happen during the spring and fall. Below are just a few of MANY tragedies.

    • Honolulu, HI, March: A 3-year-old girl died when the father left her in a child seat for 1.5 hours while he visited friends in a Waikiki apartment building. The outside temperature was only 81 degrees.
    • North Augusta, SC, April: A mother left her a 15-month-old son in a car. He was in a car for 9 hours while his mom went to work. She is now serving a 20-year prison sentence.
    • Greenville, TX, December: A 6-month-old boy died after being left in a car for more than 2 hours by his mother. She was charged with murder. The temperature rose to an unseasonably warm 81 degrees on that day.

    Adults also susceptible to hyperthermia in vehicles. On July 12, 2001, a man died of heat stroke after falling asleep in his car with the windows rolled up in the parking lot of a supermarket in Hinds County, MS.

  • Heating up

    Today is the First Day of EXTREME HEAT WEEK

    While it may be lovely Spring weather at present, it won't last and we've had some gnarly heat waves in  recent years, so we want you to be prepared.

    We'll be sharing new information about Heat Safety all week, but want o open with a look back at some great information shared in the past:

    Electrolytes, which can be found in some sports drinks, are compounds ideal for avoiding side effects associated with exorbitant perspiration. Our Electrolyte Tablets will aid in the prevention of fatigue, muscle cramps, and heat exhaustion during such excessive sweating. For convenience, each packet contains a single-dose of two tablets, and we carry a pill keychain for on-the-go readiness.2799250

  • How your state rates on child passenger safety

    Baby on Board?

    Road injuries and accidents are the leading cause of unintentional deaths to children in the United States.

    Make sure you have all the Roadside and Auto Safety Gear you need BEFORE you hit the road! Make sure you have all the Roadside and Auto Safety Gear you need BEFORE you hit the road!

    Correctly used child safety seats can reduce the risk of death by as much as 71 percent. The latest Prevention Status Reports has ratings for your state on child passenger safety, additional motor vehicle injury prevention policies, and other important public health concerns.

    Is your child’s car seat registered? Safe Kids say Parents can register their new or currently used car seat, ensuring that they are promptly notified about future recalls and guided through the repair process. Here’s how:

    • Register online with your car manufacturer, using the information found on the information sticker on your car seat.
    • Fill out the registration card that came with your car seat. It’s pre-populated with your car seat’s information. Mail the card; no postage required.

    TIP:Take a photo of your car seat label and save it to your phone so you can have it handy.

    Baby in a back seat located child safety seat

  • We're hungry! What's for dinner?

    Longest-pizza-in-the-worldIf you were in Naples right now, it might be pizza. And, actually, it might be pizza for the next several weeks. Just this week a team of pizza pros 400 strong made their way into the Guinness Book of World Records by baking a pizza 1.1 miles long, beating the previous record by over 1,000 feet. In total the process took 11 hours, more than 4,000 pounds of flour, 4,400 pounds of mozzarella, 3,300 pounds of sauce, 44 gallons of olive oil and 66 pounds of basil. And you know what? The final result looked pretty delicious:

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