Monthly Archives: June 2014

  • 4th of July Festivities

    The Independence Day Holiday Weekend is almost here - are you prepared? Do you have your plans for Fun and Safety in place?

    Some things to remember:

    Have Fun!

  • Lithium-Ion Batteries and Safety

    GPS left on Dashboard in the Sun -- and Exploded

    Looks like a good lesson to learn. I would bet this also applies to Cell phones, tablets, digital cameras, and other devices that use lithium.

    You think this may be a reason why the US Postal Service will not ship electronic devices that contain lithium batteries any longer? This GPS was placed in its bracket in the windshield and left in the sun.The battery overheated and exploded!

    After being the apple-of-the-eye of media due to the flaming and smoldering batteries incident of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner airplanes in January, Lithium-Ion batteries are now back on track.

    Li_ion_laptop_batteryDuring this event, many reports have warned consumers of the infamous packs to have the tendency to overheat devices calling serious attention of many company manufacturers of Li-ion laptop batteries.

    But according to a battery safety expert and specialist from Lexington, a mass-based technology development company Tiax, Brian M. Barnett, it is proven that these batteries are packed with safety features tested through time and statistical data.

    Based on findings, failure rates for these kinds of batteries are on the ratio of 1 in 10 million cells being produced. So to counterattack the claims on the incident on of Boeing 787 Dreamline, he said that what happened is not a reliability and safety problem, but rather an exception.

    Noting the Incident

    On the other hand, although he admitted that such is only an exception, this could still be dangerous, hence, should also be taken seriously. According to Mr. Barnett, this unlikely failures could still lead to serious and dangerous incidents such as fire and the like. Although the chances are small, this should still has to be watched out for.

    This version of Li-ion batteries are packed into smaller and lighter units, which are very common among devices such as laptops, tablets and cell phones or any other common portable equipment.

    The packaging with all the low weight with ensured packed energy density of power tools and high current machines made the invention highly attractive among consumers. This has been considered as the main reason for Boeing’s resort to the batteries.

    This has pushed scientists and engineers to work more on broadening the safety strategies addressing the characteristics of almost every battery element. This step has also joined by researchers by stitching physical, electrical and chemical properties of both the negative and positive charges of electrodes insulating them to make lesser reaction.

    They have also included in this study the ways on how to reduce the combustibility of the electrolyte solutions carrying lithium ions. Furthermore, they are also designing other options for batteries that are robust enhancing their management system that will be reflected on their performance in terms of operating parameters that provide early warning system for potential danger.

    Such initiative has been justified by Khalil Armie, Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Lithium Battery Technology Group manager explaining that this step is necessary to cater full system security and safety at all levels.

    The Weak Link: Electrolyte Solutions

    One of the noted lacking feature of these kinds of batteries is their electrolyte solutions that are flammable due to its lithium salt contents often found in ethyl methyl carbonate as opposed to the common type of batteries wherein such elements have aqueous solutions of base and acid.

    Under normal circumstances, charging of these batteries cause the li-ion in the electrolyte solution to move from the cathode via a micrometer-thin porous polymer separator to the anode. Typical cathodes use the equation LiCoO2, LiMn2O4, LiFePO4 combined with related oxides in the form of graphite.

    However, on special yet rare cases, short circuit could occur in the battery causing traumatic conditions in the battery. Such instance is confirmed by Daniel Doughty, an expert from Battery Safety Consulting from Albuquerque.

    According to him, these events could create a lot of heat inside the cell, which then could ignite the liquid causing increase in vapor and pressure until such time that the cell burst due to overpressure.

    In addition to this, instances where the battery is overcharged with the use of a charger with the wrong voltage could also push the cathode to be placed in an unsafe condition. Under these conditions, according to Doughty, the cathodes can react and decompose the electrolyte solution that later on generates heat and reactive forms of gas like hydrocarbons. This can ultimately destroy the battery in a very violent way, which may pose danger to people nearby.

    Cases of Overcharging

    This is another common scenario encountered by almost everyone who uses the li-ion batteries. Overcharging can push lithium from cathode that are accommodated through intercalation in the lattice. In such instance, the lithium metal tend to accumulate on the node surface exposing it to more reactive elements.

    This could also generate lithium dendrites that may grow through microscopic pores found in the separator and push the electrodes into direct contact with electricity. This makes short circuit to occur causing a lot of heat.

    Materials used for better battery construction for commercial purposes are very much popular these days. This offers high charge capacity while keeping an elevated temperature. It is much less stable having liberated oxygen that can react with organic elements.

    The melting of induced materials changes the safety innovation of batteries. To confirm this fact further, people from the University of Illinois have conducted examinations giving them results stating that batteries with microsphere-coated separators and anodes manifested that as the temperature within the cell approaches the melting point of the sphere, the molten material will then flow and coats the surface of the batteries.

    Electrolyte Solutions Formation

    It has been studied that with this solution, batteries flammability can be reduced. Phosphates and phosphazenes can terminate radical-based flammable reactions, which then could prevent fire.

    On the other hand, testing their reliability in real-life battery failure examinations is still yet to be further explored by experts as it has remained a challenge.

    Researches and studies are continuously being conducted to enhance quality and safety of lithium-ion batteries decreasing potential risks they may pose to users and consumers in general at any given circumstance.

    Hazardous Chemicals Found in Batteries and Their Possible Effects

    Some of the most common chemicals that are often found in batteries range from Lead, Cadmium, Mercury, Alkaline and Zinc Carbon.

    According to EveryBattery specialists, most of these chemicals could pose a huge trouble and danger not just to human health but also to the environment. Some of these elements may attach human lungs and respiratory system and even skin diseases for some who have sensitive skin complexion.

    Although the effects are not limited to these illnesses, studies show that these are the most common ones when it comes to prolonged exposure to chemicals contained by batteries.

  • Do you live in a Wildfire Prone Area?

    FIRE!

    Nobody wants to hear this, but if you do; Are You Ready? Everyone knows you need Fire Extinguishers and Smoke/CO2 Alarms, but what about Fire Resistant Document Bags, Escape ladders for exiting a burning building during a fire or other catastrophe, fire blankets, burn kits and supplies, or even Fire and Evacuation Safety training materials? Fire is the most common disaster to strike... are you and your loved ones ready?

    Learn how to protect your health during a wildfire with these tips:

    Health Threat From Wildfire Smoke

    Smoke from wildfires is a mixture of gases and fine particles from burning trees and other plant materials. Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic heart and lung diseases.

    How to tell if smoke is affecting you

    Smoke can cause—

    • Photo of wild fire.Coughing
    • A scratchy throat
    • Irritated sinuses
    • Shortness of breath
    • Chest pain
    • Headaches
    • Stinging eyes
    • A runny nose
    • Asthma exacerbations

    If you have heart or lung disease, smoke might make your symptoms worse.

    People who have heart disease might experience—

    • Chest pain
    • Rapid heartbeat
    • Shortness of breath
    • Fatigue

    Smoke may worsen symptoms for people who have pre-existing respiratory conditions, such as respiratory allergies, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in the following ways:

    • Inability to breathe normally
    • Cough with or without mucus
    • Chest discomfort
    • Wheezing and shortness of breath

    When smoke levels are high enough, even healthy people may experience some of these symptoms.

    Know whether you are at risk

    If you have heart or lung disease, such as congestive heart failure, angina, COPD, emphysema, or asthma, you are at higher risk of having health problems than healthy people.

    Older adults are more likely to be affected by smoke, possibly because they are more likely to have heart or lung diseases than younger people.

    Children are more likely to be affected by health threats from smoke because their airways are still developing and because they breathe more air per pound of body weight than adults. Children also are more likely to be active outdoors.

    Protect yourself

    Photo of respirator mask.Limit your exposure to smoke. Following are ways to protect your health:

    Pay attention to local air quality reports. Listen and watch for news or health warnings about smoke. Find out if your community provides reports about the Environmental Protection Agency's Air Quality Index (AQI). Also pay attention to public health messages about taking additional safety measures.

    Refer to visibility guides if they are available. Not every community has a monitor that measures the amount of particles that are in the air. In the western part of the United States, some communities have guidelines to help people estimate AQI based on how far they can see.

    If you are advised to stay indoors, keep indoor air as clean as possible. Keep windows and doors closed unless it is extremely hot outside. Run an air conditioner if you have one, but keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside. If you do not have an air conditioner and it is too warm to stay inside with the windows closed, seek shelter elsewhere.

    Do not add to indoor pollution. When smoke levels are high, do not use anything that burns, such as candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves. Do not vacuum, because vacuuming stirs up particles already inside your home. Do not smoke, because smoking puts even more pollution into the air.

    Follow your doctor's advice about medicines and about your respiratory management plan if you have asthma or another lung disease, Call your doctor if your symptoms worsen.

    Do not rely on dust masks for protection. Paper "comfort" or "dust" masks commonly found at hardware stores are designed to trap large particles, such as sawdust. These masks will not protect your lungs from smoke. An “N95” mask, properly worn, will offer some protection. For more information about effective masks, see the Respirator Fact Sheet provided by CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    Safe evacuation

    As you evacuate and then return home, be cautious and take the same safety measures you would when there is no emergency: buckle up and do not drink and drive. See CDC’s Impaired Driving and Seat Belts fact sheets for more information on these hazards.

    Also, make sure that children are properly buckled up and in the rear seat. See CDC’s Child Passenger Safety fact sheet for more information.

    Power outages

    Power outages can be more than an inconvenience. See our article on Blackouts, Power issues, and Generators for more information about carbon monoxide poisoning, food safety, safe drinking water, power line hazards and more.

    Evacuation and Fire

    EVACUATION & FIRE ESCAPE EQUIPMENT, SYSTEMS & SUPPLIES FIRE! Nobody wants to hear this, but if you do; Are You Ready? Everyone knows you need Fire Extinguishers and Smoke/CO2 Alarms, but what about Fire Resistant Document Bags, Escape ladders for exiting a burning building during a fire or other catastrophe, fire blankets, burn kits and supplies, or even Fire and Evacuation Safety training materials? Fire is the most common disaster to strike... are you and your loved ones ready? EVACUATION & FIRE ESCAPE EQUIPMENT, SYSTEMS & SUPPLIES
  • The Importance of Lightning Safety: #LightningSafety and #preparedness

    LightiningWeek1WHAT DID YOU DO FOR LIGHTNING SAFETY WEEK? It's not too late!
    Summer is the peak season for one of the nation's deadliest weather phenomena--lightning. Though lightning strikes peak in summer, people are struck year round. In the United States, an average of 51 people are killed each year by lightning, and hundreds more are severely injured. While lightning fatalities have decreased over the past 30 years, lightning continues to be one of the top three storm-related killers in the United States.Often, these injuries and deaths are due to misinformation around the seriousness of thunderstorms and lightning. Lightning Awareness Week exists to help bring these issues to light and to ultimately help save lives.

    This week, we wanted to provide you with lightning safety tips, educational/training resources and address many myths about lightning. Click below!  

    Below you'll find some additional information about thunderstorms and lightning:

    Owlie Skywarn, the National Weather Service's go-to-owl for safety and preparedness information, needs your help spreading the word about lightning safety this week! It's important to "HootOUT" about lightning safety to as many people as possible.  LightiningWeek5 Tweet #LightningSafety and #preparedness.

    First-Aid-Mart

  • What is the Theme for National Preparedness Month 2014?

    Wondering what the theme will be this year for National Preparedness Month? So are we!

    If you are signed up for / subscribed to our First Aid, Survival and Safety RSS Feed, you'll get this information as soon as we do!

    evacuation-sign

    Prepper

  • Do you need to worry about Hurricane Preparedness this Year?

    This Hurricane Season is predicted to be "Normal" or slightly less than average risk of major Hurricanes, Tropical Storms and Cyclones. So do you still need to prepare? Yes. Always.

    The NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a near-normal or below-normal season.

    The main driver of this year’s outlook is the anticipated development of El Niño this summer. El Niño causes stronger wind shear, which reduces the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes. El Niño can also strengthen the trade winds and increase the atmospheric stability across the tropical Atlantic, making it more difficult for cloud systems coming off of Africa to intensify into tropical storms.

    What does this mean for those living in Hurricane Zones? You still need to prepare for Hurricanes, but also plan on a HOT SUMMER!

    2014 Atlantic Hurricane Outlook graphic

    2014 Atlantic hurricane outlook. Download here (Credit:NOAA)

    Does this mean that this is a good year to plan your Summer Vacation on the Coast? Perhaps. That is really  up to you, but if you do, remember all your Beach Safety Precautions to keep the Family in good shape.

    Outdoor Protection/Preparedness

    The outlook calls for a 50 percent chance of a below-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and only a 10 percent chance of an above-normal season.  For the six-month hurricane season, which begins June 1, NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of 8 to 13 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 3 to 6 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 2 major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher).

    These numbers are near or below the seasonal averages of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes, based on the average from 1981 to 2010. The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico.Prepper

    “Thanks to the environmental intelligence from NOAA’s network of earth observations, our scientists and meteorologists can provide life-saving products like our new storm surge threat map and our hurricane forecasts,” said Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., NOAA administrator. “And even though we expect El Niño to suppress the number of storms this season, it’s important to remember it takes only one land falling storm to cause a disaster.”

    Satellite view of Humberto, the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013.Humberto was the first of only two Atlantic hurricanes in 2013. It reached peak intensity, with top winds of 90 mph, in the far eastern Atlantic.

    Download here (Credit:NOAA)

    Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said the Atlantic – which has seen above-normal seasons in 12 of the last 20 years – has been in an era of high activity for hurricanes since 1995. However, this high-activity pattern is expected to be offset in 2014 by the impacts of El Niño, and by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures than we’ve seen in recent years.

    “Atmospheric and oceanic conditions across the tropical Pacific are already taking on some El Niño characteristics. Also, we are currently seeing strong trade winds and wind shear over the tropical Atlantic, and NOAA’s climate models predict these conditions will persist, in part because of El Niño,” Bell said. “The expectation of near-average Atlantic Ocean temperatures this season, rather than the above-average temperatures seen since 1995, also suggests fewer Atlantic hurricanes.”

    NOAA is rolling out new tools at the National Hurricane Center this year. An experimental mapping tool will be used to show communities their storm surge flood threat. The map will be issued for coastal areas when a hurricane or tropical storm watch is first issued, or approximately 48 hours before the anticipated onset of tropical storm force winds. The map will show land areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas.

    Prepare! Prepare!

    Early testing on continued improvements to NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting model (HWRF) shows a 10 percent improvement in this year's model compared to last year. Hurricane forecasters use the HWRF along with other models to produce forecasts and issue warnings.  The HWRF model is being adopted by a number of Western Pacific and Indian Ocean rim nations.

     NOAA’s seasonal hurricane outlook is not a hurricane landfall forecast; it does not predict how many storms will hit land or where a storm will strike. Forecasts for individual storms and their impacts will be provided throughout the season by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center.

    "It only takes one hurricane or tropical storm making landfall to have disastrous impacts on our communities," said Joe Nimmich, FEMA associate administrator for Response and Recovery. "Just last month, Pensacola, Florida saw five inches of rain in 45 minutes – without a tropical storm or hurricane. We need you to be ready. Know your risk for hurricanes and severe weather, take action now to be prepared and be an example for others in your office, school or community. Learn more about how to prepare for hurricanes at www.ready.gov/hurricanes."

    Next week, May 25-31, is National Hurricane Preparedness Week. To help those living in hurricane-prone areas prepare, NOAA offers hurricane preparedness tips, along with video and audio public service announcements in both English and Spanish, featuring NOAA hurricane experts and the FEMA Administrator at www.hurricanes.gov/prepare.

    NOAA’s outlook for the Eastern Pacific basin is for a near-normal or above-normal hurricane season, and the Central Pacific basin is also expected to have a near-normal or above-normal season. NOAA will issue an updated outlook for the Atlantic hurricane season in early August, just prior to the historical peak of the season.

  • Lightning Safety Tips

    Lightning Safety: When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!
    Lightning Safety Awareness Week: June 22-28, 2014Lightning-RUN

    Read our When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!, and Myth Busting Lightning! It is Lightning Safe Week Post

    Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in? Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in?

    Outdoor Protection/Preparedness

  • Lightning Safety: When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!

    Lightning Safety Awareness Week: June 22-28, 2014

    Lightning Safety Awareness Week is this week. It sounds simple enough, but the idea from the National Weather Service is to keep people safe. Their motto is “when lightning roars go indoors.” That’s always the safest place to be!

    Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in? Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in?

    Lightning: What You Need to Know

    • NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area!!
    • If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you.
    • When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter: a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up.
    • Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder.

    Indoor Lightning Safety

    • Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity.
    • Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets.
    • Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.
    • Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

    Last Resort Outdoor Risk Reduction Tips

    If you are caught outside with no safe shelter anywhere nearby the following actions mayreduce your risk:

    • Immediately get off elevated areas such as hills, mountain ridges or peaks
    • Never lie flat on the ground
    • Never shelter under an isolated tree
    • Never use a cliff or rocky overhang for shelter
    • Immediately get out and away from ponds, lakes and other bodies of water
    • Stay away from objects that conduct electricity (barbed wire fences, power lines, windmills, etc.)
    Prepare! Prepare!

    An average of 51 people are killed from lightning strikes each year, and many of those could be prevented if people knew more about the dangers of lightning and just used some common sense. Lightning is said to be five to ten times hotter than the surface of the sun.

    One of the worst places to seek shelter from lightning is under a tree. Why? When lightning strikes a tree, the heat vaporizes any water in its path possibly causing the tree to explode or a strip of bark to be blown off.

  • Myth Busting Lightning! It is Lightning Safe Week.

    Lightning Safe Week is June 22-28

    Summer is the peak season for one of the nation's deadliest weather phenomena--lightning. Though lightning strikes peak in summer, people are struck year round. In the United States, an average of 51 people are killed each year by lightning, and hundreds more are severely injured. (Yes mas of Yesterday, it is officially Summer!)

    This article will talk about lightning and safety precautions therefore.

    "If there's lightning, lay down flat on the ground! Seek shelter under a tree! And don't touch someone who's been struck or you'll get shocked!" How many lightning myths have you heard?

    The truth is if you lay down on the ground, you're more exposed to electrical currents running underground! Never seek shelter from lightning under a tree. It is actually the second leading cause of lightning fatalities! And if someone is struck by lightning, don't be scared to assist him or her immediately. The human body does not store electricity, and helping them immediately could be essential to their survival!

    Before you go out in the rain, it is crucial to know your facts.

    • LightningBoltLightning often strikes the same place repeatedly, especially if it’s a tall, pointy, isolated object.
    • Most cars are safe from lightning, but it is the metal roof and metal sides that protect you, NOT the rubber tires.
    • A house is a safe place to be during a thunderstorm as long as you avoid anything that conducts electricity.
    • Height, pointy shape, and isolation are the dominant factors controlling where a lightning bolt will strike. The presence of metal makes absolutely no difference on where lightning strikes.

    First Aid Mart

    Outdoor Lightning Safety 

    • Seek

    Vehicle (stay inside with windows closed)  
    Ditch, trench or low ground
    (except in heavy rain)
    Group of shrubs or trees of uniform height

    • Squat, kneel or sit, don’t lie flat
    • Cover ears with hands

    Indoor Lightning Precautions

    • Stand clear from windows, doors and electrical appliances
    • Avoid contact with piping, including sinks, bath/shower area, faucets
    • Avoid using telephone except in emergency

    If you’re caught outside, stay in or get in your vehicle if it’s close by, and keep the windows closed. If you are unable to reach adequate shelter, seek the lowest available ground, while avoiding ditches or trenches in heavy rain. Seek out a group of trees or shrubs of the same height.

    Wherever you are, don’t lie flat on the ground.  You present a smaller target for lightning if you squat, kneel or sit.

    Remember that Lightning danger is not limited to the outdoors.  If you are indoors while an electrical storm is passing through your area, be sure to:

    Stand clear from windows, doors and electrical appliances

    Avoid contact with piping, including sinks, bath/shower area and faucets

    Avoid using a telephone except in an emergency

    Covering your ears will help prevent damage from loud thunder right above you.

    Keep yourself and others safe by being lighting aware. Lightning Safety Week begins June 22! For more information on lightning, visit the NOAA lightning page. And for thunderstorm safety tips visit the http://www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning.

    NOAA lightning page. And for thunderstorm safety tips visit the http://www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning.

    READ MORE:

    Lightning Safety Myths and Facts


    Myth: Lightning never strikes the same place twice.
    Fact: Lightning often strikes the same place repeatedly, especially if it’s a tall, pointy, isolated object. The Empire State Building is hit nearly 100 times a year.

    Myth: If it’s not raining or there aren’t clouds overhead, you’re safe from lightning.
    Fact: Lightning often strikes more than three miles from the center of the thunderstorm, far outside the rain or thunderstorm cloud. “Bolts from the blue” can strike 10-15 miles from the thunderstorm.

    Myth: Rubber tires on a car protect you from lightning by insulating you from the ground.
    Fact: Most cars are safe from lightning, but it is the metal roof and metal sides that protect you, NOT the rubber tires. Remember, convertibles, motorcycles, bicycles, open-shelled outdoor recreational vehicles and cars with fiberglass shells offer no protection from lightning. When lightning strikes a vehicle, it goes through the metal frame into the ground. Don't lean on doors during a thunderstorm.

    Myth: A lightning victim is electrified. If you touch them, you’ll be electrocuted.
    Fact: The human body does not store electricity. It is perfectly safe to touch a lightning victim to give them first aid. This is the most chilling of lightning Myths. Imagine if someone died because people were afraid to give CPR!

    Myth: If outside in a thunderstorm, you should seek shelter under a tree to stay dry.
    Fact: Being underneath a tree is the second leading cause of lightning casualties. Better to get wet than fried!

    Myth: If you are in a house, you are 100% safe from lightning.
    Fact: A house is a safe place to be during a thunderstorm as long as you avoid anything that conducts electricity. This means staying off corded phones, electrical appliances, wires, TV cables, computers, plumbing, metal doors and windows. Windows are hazardous for two reasons: wind generated during a thunderstorm can blow objects into the window, breaking it and causing glass to shatter and second, in older homes, in rare instances, lightning can come in cracks in the sides of windows.

    Myth: If thunderstorms threaten while you are outside playing a game, it is okay to finish it before seeking shelter.
    Fact: Many lightning casualties occur because people do not seek shelter soon enough. No game is worth death or life-long injuries. Seek proper shelter immediately if you hear thunder. Adults are responsible for the safety of children.

    Myth: Structures with metal, or metal on the body (jewelry, cell phones,Mp3 players, watches, etc), attract lightning.
    Fact: Height, pointy shape, and isolation are the dominant factors controlling where a lightning bolt will strike. The presence of metal makes absolutely no difference on where lightning strikes. Mountains are made of stone but get struck by lightning many times a year. When lightning threatens, take proper protective action immediately by seeking a safe shelter – don’t waste time removing metal. While metal does not attract lightning, it does conduct it so stay away from metal fences, railing, bleachers, etc.

    Myth: If trapped outside and lightning is about to strike, I should lie flat on the ground.
    Fact: Lying flat increases your chance of being affected by potentially deadly ground current. If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm, you keep moving toward a safe shelter.

    Outdoor Protection/Preparedness

    when thunder roars go indoors sign

    Safety: Learn what you need to do to stay safe when thunderstorms threaten.

    Description: Side Flash.JPG

    Victims: Learn what happens to people who are struck by lightning and look at fatality statistics for the U.S.
    animation of Charged Cloud Science: Learn how thunderstorms develop and what happens during a lightning discharge.

    lightning

    Myths and Facts: Get answers to many of the questions you have always wondered about

    LeonthelightningLion

    Teachers: find curriculum guides, presentations games, activities, and more. Kids: Download games, videos, coloring pages and other fun stuff. publications and other resources More Resources: Download toolkits, posters, pamphlets, and other information to help communities, organizations, and families stay safe from the dangers of lightning
  • Ticks cause Disease - Fight the Bite!

    Fight the Bite

    6he0ycqt

    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    TICKS -

    insectrepellents-animated[1]Spray Before You Work or Play

    Blacklegged tick (deer tick) life stages next to a metric ruler. The adult ticks (two ticks at the left) are approximately 1/8 of an inch long, while the nymph (third from left) is just under 1/16 of an inch.

    Blacklegged Ticks (Deer Tick, Bear Tick)

    The scientific name of the blacklegged tick is Ixodes scapularis. Many people still know the blacklegged tick by another common name, the deer tick. You may also hear it called the bear tick. They are all the same tick.

    The blacklegged tick is much smaller than the wood (or dog) tick.

    In this photo, the tick on the left is an adult female deer tick, which is red and dark brown. To her right is an adult male deer tick, which is smaller and dark in color. A nymph deer tick is the second from the right, and a deer tick larva is to the far right. CDC(Scale of image is centimeters.)

    In this photo, the tick on the left is an adult female blacklegged tick, which is red and dark brown. To her right is an adult male blacklegged tick, which is smaller and dark in color. A nymph blacklegged tick is the second from the right, and a blacklegged tick larva is to the far right.

    Adult females and nymphs can transmit infections through their bite.

    Preventing Tick-Transmitted Disease
    Information about minimizing your risk of tick-transmitted diseases, protecting your pets, and removing ticks.

    PROTECT YOURSELF FROM TICK BITES
    Know when you are in tick habitat; this is when it is most important to take precautions:

    • Wooded or brushy areas for the blacklegged tick.
    • Grassy or wooded areas for the American dog tick.

    If you spend time outdoors in tick habitat, use repellent to reduce the risk of disease:

    • DEET-based repellents (up to 30 percent DEET) can be applied to clothing or skin.
    • Pre-treating fabric with permethrin-based repellents can protect against tick bites for at least two weeks without reapplication. This is an excellent option for people who frequently venture into wooded areas.
    • WATCH THE VIDEO ABOUT CLOTHING AND GEAR REPELLENT ?
    [video width="640" height="360" wmv="/blogs/first-aid-mart/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Bens-Clothing-and-Gear.wmv"][/video]

    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    People who live, or spend time at cabins, on heavily wooded property often encounter ticks regularly and should consider managing their landscape to reduce their risk. Consider the following tick habitat management strategies:

    • Keep lawns and trails mowed short.
    • Remove leaves and brush.
    • Create a landscape barrier of wood chips or rocks between mowed lawns and woods.
    • Apply pesticide treatments in the spring or early summer along the edges of wooded yards and trails; follow pesticide label instructions carefully.

    PERFORM DAILY TICK CHECKS
    Perform tick checks after spending time outdoors in tick habitat.  Check your body for ticks by searching your entire body for ticks.  If you find a tick on you, remove it immediately.

    Early detection of tick-borne illness is important to prevent potentially severe complications, so people should seek medical care if they develop symptoms that could be a tick-borne disease after spending time in tick habitat. Signs and symptoms of the various tick-borne diseases can include, but are not limited to, rash, fever, headache, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain or swelling. These symptoms can be associated with other diseases, so it is important for patients to mention possible tick exposures or time spent in tick habitat to their medical provider. Except for Powassan disease, which is caused by a virus, all of Minnesota's tick-borne diseases are treatable with antibiotics.

    Insect Repellent & Sting Relief Products

    READ MORE:

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