Monthly Archives: February 2014

  • Hazard Prevention and Control in the Work Environment

    hazardIn most companies, an effective management is in place that establishes a protocol to actively control hazards through timely identification and by adopting useful correction methods. The best part is that on recognizing hazards and potential hazards properly, the correct hazard prevention, decontamination and control programs can be designed. One such way is to implement a hierarchy of controls for a systematic determination of the most effective and practicable methods for reducing the risks coupled with a hazard. Here is a list of such hierarchy of controls that can be applied for a high degree of risk reduction.

    Hierarchy of Controls:

    1) Eradication of hazard related materials that include decontamination processes.
    2) Replacement of less hazardous materials or processes. Changing the operations or equipment in place that are accountable for a disaster.
    3) Engineering proper control strategies.
    4) Proper communication through words of warning.
    5) Administrative controls through training, job planning, rotation and forecasting.
    6) Making changes to working procedures for the implementation of work area protection methodologies like barricades and other similar measures.
    7) Keeping personal protective equipment ready for on time usage.

    "DOT HAZMAT General Awareness" focus on employees who handle hazardous materials. The products review a number of topics aimed at making these employees more aware of situations in which they may encounter hazardous chemicals, the nature of the hazards and the issue of taking appropriate security measures when dealing with hazardous materials that the DOT has added to the regulation. Topics covered in these products include:     The regulation itself.     Hazardous materials, definitions and classes.     Hazard communication.     Hazard "indicators", such as labels, shipping papers and placards.     Where hazardous materials may be encountered.     Packaging and storage.     Shipping.     Transport (trucks, ships, rail, etc.).     Security risks and terrorism.     and more. Get a Quote for a Class: DOT HAZMAT General Awareness Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location "DOT HAZMAT General Awareness" focus on employees who handle hazardous materials. The products review a number of topics aimed at making these employees more aware of situations in which they may encounter hazardous chemicals, the nature of the hazards and the issue of taking appropriate security measures when dealing with hazardous materials that the DOT has added to the regulation. Topics covered in these products include:
    The regulation itself.
    Hazardous materials, definitions and classes.
    Hazard communication.
    Hazard "indicators", such as labels, shipping papers and placards.
    Where hazardous materials may be encountered.
    Packaging and storage.
    Shipping.
    Transport (trucks, ships, rail, etc.).
    Security risks and terrorism.
    and more.
    Get a Quote for a Class:
    DOT HAZMAT General Awareness Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

    Engineering controls have a very significant role to play as far as the reduction or elimination of exposure to risk factors are concerned. The underlying principle is that engineering controls put into practice single time changes that basically protect all employees. These include physical changes to workstations, introduction of handy equipment and installing them at the right places, changes in the production facility and many other relevant aspects of the work environment. So these engineering controls are permanent controls and the opportunity for their implementation exists primarily in the design stage. Such a modified design enables requisite change making possible during an on-going job or process stage.

    Besides engineering controls, administrative controls also have an important role to play for preventing and controlling hazards in a work place. The procedures involved in it notably limit daily contact to hazardous substances by controlling or manipulating the work schedule. Sometimes the manner in which work is performed is also modified or effective outcomes. The opportunities through which these controls are exercised are by introducing rest pauses, job rotations, more number of employees so that there are sufficient number of standby or relief personnel, proper supervision and restricted duty jobs.

    Work practice controls basically involve procedures that enable the safe and proper working so that specific tasks are assigned to certain workplace employees or personnel. These are highly focused work practices that include ergonomic programs for a proper work technique, employee training, habitual monitoring, feedback collection, maintenance, adjustments, modifications and finally enforcement. Besides, personal protective equipment and decontamination equipment also needs to be chosen with ergonomic points in mind.

    So one can say that there are four basic methods to prevent, reduce or eliminate exposure to risks or hazards in a workplace. These are engineering controls that include work station changes, administrative controls like work pattern changes, work practice controls like new training methodologies and finally protective equipment usage at a personal level by the employees. By following these four

    Get Hazardous Materials Safety Training CDs, books, Videos/DVDs, Instructor Guides and more! Get Hazardous Materials Safety Training CDs, books, Videos/DVDs, Instructor Guides and more!

    methodologies properly, hazards can be effectively prevented in a workplace and if the need arises, they can be controlled in cases of outbreaks as well.

    "DOT HAZMAT General Awareness" focuses on employees who handle hazardous materials. The products review a number of topics aimed at making these employees more aware of situations in which they may encounter hazardous chemicals, the nature of the hazards and the issue of taking appropriate security measures when dealing with hazardous materials that the DOT has added to the regulation. Topics covered in these products include:

    • The regulation itself.
    • Hazardous materials, definitions and classes.
    • Hazard communication.
    • Hazard "indicators", such as labels, shipping papers and placards.
    • Where hazardous materials may be encountered.
    • Packaging and storage.
    • Shipping.
    • Transport (trucks, ships, rail, etc.).
    • Security risks and terrorism.
    • and more.

    Get a Quote for a Class:
    DOT HAZMAT General Awareness Live Instruction Training Courses at YOUR Location

  • 2014 Preparedness Summit

    2014 Preparedness Summit

    attend1
    Save the Date for the
    2014 Preparedness Summit
    April 1-4, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia

    The Preparedness Summit is the premier national conference in the field of public health preparedness. The four-day annual event provides one of the only cross-disciplinary learning opportunities in the field and has evolved over time to meet the growing needs of the preparedness community. A diverse range of attendees includes professionals working in all levels of government (local, state, and federal), emergency management, volunteer organizations, and healthcare coalitions. The Summit delivers opportunities to connect with colleagues, share new research, and learn how to implement model practices that enhance capabilities to prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters and emergencies. Each year, attendance at the Summit has continued to grow.

    Save the Date for the
    2014 Preparedness Summit
    April 1-4, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia

    Preparedness-SummitIn 2013, the Summit brought 1,741 attendees to Atlanta, Georgia from nearly every state, and several territories and countries, including China and Australia. A survey of attendees indicated that two out of three were mid- to senior- level professionals. Nearly all attendees (over 90%) expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the Summit and indicated that they would take information, tools, and resources acquired at the Summit to use in their professional practice and share with colleagues and community partners.

    attendees-profile500The Preparedness Summit is the first and longest running national conference on public health preparedness. Since the Summit began in 2006, the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) has taken a leadership role in convening a wide array of partners to participate in the Summit. This year’s partners include the American Hospital Association, the American Red Cross, the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH), the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), and Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center (VEMEC).

    /catalog/Disaster_Survival_Preparation/C10081.aspx
    Disaster, Survival, Preparation
    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
    Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, you should Check your Emergency Supplies, too:
    Count your stock... is it enough?
    Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    Keep cash on hand
    Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
  • What do you keep in your car for emergency supplies?

    Everyone has their list - from Road Warriors to AAA Emergency Kits... Winter Driving and Severe Weather Driving Kits to make-your-own emergency kits... What's in your list of Car Emergency Supplies?

    Here are some great suggestions:

    • Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits. Auto First Aid Kits - Car, Auto, Vehicle and Truck First Aid Kits. First Aid Only, AAA, American Red Cross, Genuine First Aid, North, and Lifeline Auto First Aid and Roadside Emergency Kits.

      Blankets/Sleeping bags/Space blanket

    • Batteries – extra for flashlight/phone etc.
    • Battery charger for phone
    • Car-cell phone charger
    • Card Deck
    • Coffee mug
    • Cold Weather – ice scraper, cat litter, extra cold weather clothes.
    • Cooking pot – to heat food/water
    • DC to AC converter
    • Duct tape
    • Fire Extinguisher
    • Flashlight
    • First aid kit
    • Food – easy open.
    • Full tank of gas
    • Ice scraper
    • Jumper cables
    • Kitchen size trash bags
    • Matches
    • Medications – extra
    • Multi-tool
    • Pen/Paper
    • Rope
    • Shoes – good walking shoes.
    • Shovel
    • Tarp
    • Tire sealant kit
    • Toilet paper
    • Tools
    • Tow strap
    • Utensils
    • Water
    • Tea Candles
    • Heat source for cooking & warming
    • 12v dc air pump

  • What is First Aid?

    Hopefully everyone has had First Aid Training, has a great First Aid Kit, and well stocked, current expiration First Aid Supplies. We hope, too, that you have taken advantage of our Free First Aid Video to learn how to put those first aid items to use when needed.

    Now the next questions:
    When is it a First Aid Situation, When should you see your medical practitioner, and When is it time to rush to the Urgent Care or Emergency Room?

    First Aid is defined as " emergency care or treatment given to an ill or injured person before regular medical aid can be obtained ".
    Here's a great article from Denton Publications that gives one opinion:

    First aid? Not so fast.

    Elizabethtown Community Hospital (ECH) wants the public to know that while they’re always delighted to see you, residents with non-life threatening medical situations should first visit their primary care physicians before taking potentially costly trips to the emergency room.

    “When in doubt, call your general practitioner,” said Jane Hooper, ECH’s Director of Community Relations.

    According to emergency department staff, ECH sees a significant number of patients with dental pain, colds and stomach aches in their emergency department. Hooper said that while some of these may cause severe discomfort, they could often be better handled by primarily care physicians.

    The issue arises when the emergency department is busy with emergent situations — issues like traffic accidents, heart attacks and traumatic injuries, for example — and staff is occupied with caring for those patients. People with non-emergent situations may end up waiting longer than they are comfortable with.

    “It’s not unusual to have someone with a cold make their way to the emergency department in the middle of the night,” said Julie Tromblee, RN, director of patient services. “In those situations, staff offers suggestions to help alleviate the symptoms and works to refer patients to a primary care physician.”

    Other examples include minor cuts that require several stitches, ear infections and sprains, the latter of which is particularly common in the region because of the community’s “fix-it-yourself” ethic paired with the grueling wintertime weather.

    “If you have an injury like that, and it’s normal business hours and there isn’t an underlying condition involved, start by calling your general practitioner and get their advice,” said Hooper.

    “Primary care is the cornerstone of good medical care,” added Mary Glickman, medical director of Smith House Health Center in Willsboro. “There are so many conditions that, if properly and consistently managed by patients and their physician, complications may never occur, keeping that patient out of the emergency room. This also holds true for some minor, non life-threatening emergencies.”

    Hooper said ECH encourages everyone to establish a primary care physician.

    “Each of the hospital’s community-based health centers is currently accepting new patients,” she said, “and each center owned by the hospital leaves space in its appointment calendar for situations that may require more immediate attention, such as a wound requiring stitches, ankle sprain or a child with a potential ear infection.”

    The four health centers are located in Westport, Wilmington, Willsboro and Elizabethtown.

    Hooper said more Americans are using hospital emergency departments because they face long waits for appointments with their physician and limited after-hours options.

    Many studies have found the cost of treating non-emergent conditions in the emergency department is significantly higher than in other settings, which can increase patients’ out-of-pocket costs and add avoidable spending to the nation’s health care bill.

    American Red Cross First Aid & Emergency Kits - Click the image to view all American Red Cross First Aid & Emergency Kits - Click the image to view all
  • National Hurricane Conference

    The primary goal of the National Hurricane Conference is to improve hurricane preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation in order to save lives and property in the United States and the tropical islands of the Caribbean and Pacific. In addition, the conference serves as a national forum for federal, state and local officials to exchange ideas and recommend new policies to improve Emergency Management.

    To accomplish these goals, the annual conference emphasizes:

    National Hurricane Conference 2014 logo

    National Hurricane Conference - APRIL 14th-17th | ORLANDO

    • Lessons Learned from Hurricane Strikes
    • State of the art programs worthy of emulation
    • New ideas being tested or considered
    • Information about new or ongoing assistance programs
    • The ABC’s of hurricane preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation — in recognition of the fact that there is a continual turnover of emergency management leadership and staff

    Hurricane_Isabel

    Disaster Emergency Survival Supplies Emergency Survival Kits and Supplies

    The National Hurricane Conference is the nation’s forum for education and professional training in hurricane preparedness. With an average of 2,000 attendees from around the country, the conference covers all major aspects of hurricane preparedness, response and recovery, which will provide your company with a unique opportunity to show your wares to a large audience of interested decision-makers.

    ARE YOU PREPARED FOR A HURRICANE?

  • Budget for Preparedness

    • Can you afford to Prepare?
    • Can you afford not to?

    In a recent FEMA household survey, we learned more than a quarter of participants reported they believe getting prepared is too expensive. Creating your disaster preparedness kit does not have to be costly! In fact, many of the items for your kit may be found around your home!

    After you have built the majority of your kit from items already in your home, you can begin to build a list for the remaining items. Here are some additional tips from citizens across the country for keeping your disaster kit cost-friendly:

    • Shop at discount and dollar stores where appropriate;
    • Trade extra supplies with friends or family; and
    • Check the newspaper or online listings for discounted products.

    For more simple and cost-friendly disaster kit suggestions, and easy steps you should take if disaster strikes, you can access FEMA’s free online “Preparedness on a Shoestring” activity module.

    The “Preparedness on a Shoestring” activity module is part of FEMA’s “Preparedness Activities for Communities Everywhere” tools, which educates individuals about relatively easy steps to take to become prepared for all types of hazards. FAM

  • Shelter in the Storm

    Choosing to take shelter is necessary in many emergencies.

    Taking appropriate shelter is critical in times of disaster. Sheltering is appropriate when conditions require that you seek protection in your home, place of employment or other location when disaster strikes. Sheltering outside the hazard area could include staying with friends and relatives, seeking commercial lodging or staying in a mass care facility operated by disaster relief groups.

    To effectively shelter, you must first consider the hazard and then choose a place in your home or other building that is safe for that hazard. For example, for a tornado, a room should be selected that is in a basement or an interior room on the lowest level away from corners, windows, doors and outside walls.

    Taking appropriate shelter is critical for protection in times of disaster. When conditions require it, you may need to seek shelter in your home, workplace or school. Sheltering outside the hazard area could include staying with friends or relatives or at a mass care facility operated by disaster relief groups.

    The safest location to seek shelter varies by hazard. For example, select a room in a basement or an interior room on the lowest level away from windows and outside walls if a tornado strikes.

    Depending on the type of disaster, there may be times when it is best to “shelter in place” to avoid uncertainty outdoors. Some guidelines for sheltering in place include:

    • Bring your family and pets inside immediately;
    • Get your emergency supply kit;
    • Lock doors, close windows, air vents and fireplace dampers; and
    • Go to an interior room with few or no windows.

    If the need arises, you could be asked to create a barrier of protection between yourself and potentially contaminated air outside. Learn the steps required to “seal the room.” It could be a matter of survival!

    Even though mass care shelters often provide water, food, medicine and basic sanitary facilities, you should plan to take your disaster supplies kit with you so you will have the supplies you require. Mass care sheltering can involve living with many people in a confined space, which can be difficult and unpleasant. To avoid conflicts in the stressful situation, it is important to cooperate with shelter managers and others assisting them. Keep in mind that alcoholic beverages and weapons are forbidden in emergency shelters and smoking is restricted.

    Search for open shelters by texting SHELTER and a Zip Code to 43362 (4FEMA). Ex: Shelter 01234 (standard rates apply)

    Learn more by visiting: http://www.disasterassistance.gov/

    The safest locations to seek shelter vary by hazard. Be Informed about the sheltering suggestions for each hazard.

    There may be situations, depending on your circumstances and the nature of the disaster, when it's simply best to stay where you are and avoid any uncertainty outside by “sheltering in place.

    The length of time you are required to shelter may be short, such as during a tornado warning, or long, such as during a winter storm or a pandemic. It is important that you stay in shelter until local authorities say it is safe to leave. Additionally, you should take turns listening to radio broadcasts and maintain a 24-hour safety watch.

    Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in? Are you ready to Bug Out or Bunker in?

    During extended periods of sheltering, you will need to manage water and food supplies to ensure you and your family have the required supplies and quantities. Think about Managing Water and Managing Food.

  • Power of One - Stranded?

    You’re stranded on the highway for hours, in the cold, with little food and no heat and your car just ran out of gas. The nearest restroom is at least three miles away and you don’t know when you’ll be in the comfort of your home again. This was the case for many metro Atlanta residents during a winter storm that recently hit the south. Out of this tragedy, however, came triumph - people took action and helped each other overcome this crisis.

    There were countless stories of people opening their homes to strangers, offering food to the hungry, walking to get medication for those in need and more. Many of these citizen rescue operations were coordinated on the Facebook page, “Snowed Out Atlanta.” Within a few hours this page quickly gained 50,000 followers who not only reached out to get help, but to serve their neighbors. The woman who started this page, Michelle Sollicito, is a mother, wife and most of all an everyday community member who wanted to help. She took action and stepped up to be a community ambassador.

    Brrrr... Ready for the cold? A well stocked Weather Pack designed to provide security while traveling in cold weather. Great gift ....

    You, just like Michelle, can also be a community ambassador for preparedness. Use your social media channels, email or word-of-mouth to share these five actions people can do now to get prepared!

    1. Visit ready.gov and familiarize yourself with steps to take before, during and after every natural disaster.
    2. Practice and implement – don’t just educate yourself on preparedness actions; practice them with family, friends and coworkers. Why wait to build an emergency kit?—do it today!
    3. Download the FEMA mobile application. It contains disaster safety tips, an interactive emergency kit list, emergency meeting location information and a map with open shelters and open FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers.
    4. Start or join a local CERT or Citizen Corps Council.
    5. Spread the word about America’s PrepareAthon! coming this spring – follow the campaign on Twitter at @PrepareAthon and share preparedness tips and how you‘re preparing others by using #prepareAthon.
    6. Disaster, Survival, Preparation

      Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
      72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
      Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
      Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
      What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
      Of course, you should Check your Emergency Supplies, too:

      • Count your stock... is it enough?
      • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
      • Keep cash on hand
      • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
      • Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
  • Free AEDs for Schools!

    The Parent Teacher Student Organization at Taylor Intermediate School will be selling 40-piece first aid kits as a fundraiser.

    The goal is to sell at least 300 kits, because the school will earn an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). An AED is a portable electronic device that automatically diagnoses life-threatening cardiac emergencies in a victim and is able to treat them through defibrillation. Why isn't your school doing this?

    Plan D - D is for "Defibrillator"

    Free AEDs for Schools and Churches

    Need an AED for your School, Church, or Group? Free AEDs really are available with the AED fundraiser. Just sell these great First Aid Kits and get a free Automated External Defibrillator and a lot more. Who needs a grant for School technology or Playground safety? Get a FREE AED Today!

    Sell these - Auto & Home Fundraiser Kits - Suggested Retail: $3000 for 300 KitsDefibtech LifeLine AED - 5 yr battery - Suggested Retail: $1495

    COMES WITH THIS! AND THIS!!! THEN WE ADD THIS!!!! & EVEN ADD THIS!!!!!!
    Defibtech Standard Battery Pack
    Defibtech Standard Battery Pack
    Suggested Retail: $150.00
    Defibtech Adult Defibrillation Pads
    Defibtech Adult Defibrillation Pads
    Suggested Retail: $38.00
    Defibtech Child/Infant Electrode Pads
    Defibtech Child/Infant Electrode Pads
    Suggested Retail: $99.00
    AED Wall Cabinet with Alarm 
    AED Wall Cabinet with Alarm
    Suggested Retail: $224.95
    1. You sell the 300 kits @ $10 each ($3000)
    2. Deliver the 300 kits to your customers
    3. KEEP THE REST (over a $2000 Retail Value with Free Shipping!) FOR YOUR SCHOOL
     By Popular Demand – we are also now offering First Aid Fundraising Plan D2:

    Sell 10 more kits and UPGRADE the above to the
    7 year Battery & Warranty Model Defibtech AED!

    Plan D: Mixed Fundraiser Kit Pack with AED
    Plan D: Mixed Fundraiser Kit Pack with AED
    ITEM / SKU: URG-3000-DFundraiser Plan D (D is for Defibrillator)The Plan D Package comes with 300 Fundraiser Kits* (150 Auto & 150 Home)
    Sell these kits for $10 a piece and you'll break even with a FREE AED with SOOO MANY accessories.We give you a Defibtech Lifeline AED FREE! The Defibtech Lifeline AED comes with a 5 Year Battery Pack and 1 Pair of Adult Defibrillation Pads.  Just because... We are going to throw in a pair of Child / Infant Electrode Pads and a AED Wall Cabinet with Alarm!

    • (150) Home Fundraiser First Aid Kits
    • (150) Auto Fundraiser First Aid Kits
    • (1) Defibtech Lifeline AED - 5 Year Battery & 5 Year Warranty - FREE!!
      • (1) Defibtech Standard 5 Year Battery Pack - AED COMES WITH THIS!!
      • (1 Pair) Defibtech Adult Defibrillation Pads - AND THIS!!
    • (1 Pair) Defibtech Child / Infant Electrode Pads - WE ADD THIS!!!
    • (1) AED Wall Cabinet with Alarm - & EVEN ADD THIS!!!

    Plan D2: Mixed Fundraiser Kit Pack with AED
    Plan D2: Mixed Fundraiser Kit Pack with AED
    ITEM / SKU: URG-3000-D2Fundraiser Plan D2 (D is for Defibrillator)The Plan D2 Package comes with 310 Fundraiser Kits* (155 Auto & 155 Home)
    Sell these kits for $10 a piece and you'll break even with a FREE AED with SOOO MANY accessories.We give you a Defibtech Lifeline AED FREE! The Defibtech Lifeline AED comes with a 5 Year Battery Pack and 1 Pair of Adult Defibrillation Pads.  Just because... We are going to throw in a pair of Child / Infant Electrode Pads and a AED Wall Cabinet with Alarm!

    • (155) Home Fundraiser First Aid Kits
    • (155) Auto Fundraiser First Aid Kits
    • (1) Defibtech Lifeline AED - 7 Year Battery & 7 Year Warranty - FREE!!
      • (1) Defibtech Standard 7 Year Battery Pack - AED COMES WITH THIS!!
      • (1 Pair) Defibtech Adult Defibrillation Pads - AND THIS!!
    • (1 Pair) Defibtech Child / Infant Electrode Pads - WE ADD THIS!!!
    • (1) AED Wall Cabinet with Alarm - & EVEN ADD THIS!!!

    Also see the General First Aid Fundraiser Page >>

  • All men are liars

    Ready for a matter of life or death?

    Could you save someone's life if you had to? Say your mum or your son, or the lady across the street falls over, they're not breathing, what do you do? Call an ambulance? Of course, but then what?

    It's a horrifying scenario yet it happens every day - it's happened to me six times over the years - car accidents, elderly people tripping, tourists collapsing of heat exhaustion, a man having an epileptic fit.

    I'm an active surf lifesaver, yet none of these incidents took place when I was on patrol at the beach. Thankfully, the basic first aid skills you learn are portable, which is why it's estimated surf lifesavers save more lives away from the beach, in everyday life, than actually on the sand.

    Don't get me wrong - I'm not getting a gig on RPA or Bondi Rescue - those people are pros and they actually save lives for a living, but you and I can do our part.

    Everyone needs to know CPR - and it is not expensive to learn. American CPR Training teaches group classes at your location from as low as $16.50 per Student for full 2 year Adult, Child & Infant CPR - anywhere in the USA!

    If you don't have a group of 4 or more, there is  an awesome program to learn CPR at Home (including CPR Manikins!)

    The national group American CPR Training (www.AmericanCPR.com) is teaching their new easy C.A.R.E. CPR™ Their website says:
    American CPR Training™ ~ America's Favorite CPR, AED & First Aid Training™ is more than just the Leader in Safety Training throughout the US, Canada, & Mexico... American CPR Training is ½ the Time, ½ the Price, and TWICE the Fun!™

    Having been in situations where people were distressed or unconscious before I trained as a lifesaver, I can tell you it's a horrible feeling having no idea what to do.

    Possessing a passable knowledge of CPR and first aid is not much better in the fear stakes when a pensioner has dived face first into the pavement, blood blooming around their crushed head - but at least you can do something.

    <i>Illustration: michaelmucci.com</i>Illustration: michaelmucci.com

    Reassure, put them in the recovery position, check their breathing while the ambulance gets there.

    I heard a story recently about an elderly woman found by a good-intentioned passer-by with no understanding of first aid. They rolled the woman, who was lying on her side, on to her back. She choked to death.

    Unconscious people have no control of their airways - this is why the ''recovery position'' tilts the head towards the ground, so the tongue, or fluids like vomit, don't impair breathing. The Australian Resuscitation Council's guidelines put it this way: ''When a victim is unconscious, all muscles are relaxed. If the victim is left lying on the back, their tongue, which is attached to the back of the jaw, falls against the back wall of the throat and blocks air from entering the lungs.''

    It's simple stuff that saves lives; maybe someone you know or love.

    For sheer, unbridled terror, however, nothing has ever come close to the experience of my daughter pulling a scalding hot long black coffee on to her face a few months ago.

    We were at a cafe, I was waiting for a food order and the barista put my coffee on top of a laminated menu. My daughter reached up to the counter to see what was going on and dragged the menu and coffee on to her head.

    Screams. Panic. What do you do?

    A news item in this newspaper last week revealed almost a third of Australians have no idea how to treat burns, using ''remedies'' such as toothpaste, eggs, honey, yoghurt or tea tree oil on children.

    They don't work. The only thing that does is cold water - 20 minutes of it. I yelled for water, but it was a small, crowded cafe; I couldn't stuff her head into a tiny, dish-filled sink.

    The best staff could do was give me a glass, which I poured on her face, then we fled across the road to the beach showers, my daughter screaming. She rarely screams.

    The water did its job. The splash burns were superficial. She's good as gold. We were lucky, but I'm so thankful I knew what to do.

    Would you?

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