Monthly Archives: September 2013

  • NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards / First Aid Procedures

    NIOSHInteresting - not what you learn in a typical First Aid Class!

    First Aid Procedures for Chemical Hazard Environments/Exposure

    Code Definition
    Eye: Irrigate immediately If this chemical contacts the eyes, immediately wash (irrigate) the eyes with large amounts of water, occasionally lifting the lower and upper lids. Get medical attention immediately.
    Eye: Irrigate promptly If this chemical contacts the eyes, promptly wash (irrigate) the eyes with large amounts of water, occasionally lifting the lower and upper lids. Get medical attention if any discomfort continues.
    Eye: Frostbite If eye tissue is frozen, seek medical attention immediately; if tissue is not frozen, immediately and thoroughly flush the eyes with large amounts of water for at least 15 minutes, occasionally lifting the lower and upper eyelids. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, get medical attention as soon as possible.
    Eye: Medical attention Self-explanatory
    Skin: Blot/brush away If irritation occurs, gently blot or brush away excess.
    Skin: Dust off solid; water flush If this solid chemical contacts the skin, dust it off immediately and then flush the contaminated skin with water. If this chemical or liquids containing this chemical penetrate the clothing, promptly remove the clothing and flush the skin with water. Get medical attention immediately.
    Skin: Frostbite If frostbite has occurred, seek medical attention immediately; do NOT rub the affected areas or flush them with water. In order to prevent further tissue damage, do NOT attempt to remove frozen clothing from frostbitten areas. If frostbite has NOT occurred, immediately and thoroughly wash contaminated skin with soap and water.
    Skin: Molten flush immediately/solid-liquid soap wash immediately If this molten chemical contacts the skin, immediately flush the skin with large amounts of water. Get medical attention immediately. If this chemical (or liquids containing this chemical) contacts the skin, promptly wash the contaminated skin with soap and water. If this chemical or liquids containing this chemical penetrate the clothing, immediately remove the clothing and wash the skin with soap and water. If irritation persists after washing, get medical attention.
    Skin: Soap flush immediately If this chemical contacts the skin, immediately flush the contaminated skin with soap and water. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, immediately remove the clothing and flush the skin with water. If irritation persists after washing, get medical attention.
    Skin: Soap flush promptly If this chemical contacts the skin, promptly flush the contaminated skin with soap and water. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, promptly remove the clothing and flush the skin with water. If irritation persists after washing, get medical attention.
    Skin: Soap promptly/molten flush immediately If this solid chemical or a liquid containing this chemical contacts the skin, promptly wash the contaminated skin with soap and water. If irritation persists after washing, get medical attention. If this molten chemical contacts the skin or nonimpervious clothing, immediately flush the affected area with large amounts of water to remove heat. Get medical attention immediately.
    Skin: Soap wash If this chemical contacts the skin, wash the contaminated skin with soap and water.
    Skin: Soap wash immediately If this chemical contacts the skin, immediately wash the contaminated skin with soap and water. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, immediately remove the clothing, wash the skin with soap and water, and get medical attention promptly.
    Skin: Soap wash promptly If this chemical contacts the skin, promptly wash the contaminated skin with soap and water. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, promptly remove the clothing and wash the skin with soap and water. Get medical attention promptly.
    Skin: Water flush If this chemical contacts the skin, flush the contaminated skin with water. Where there is evidence of skin irritation, get medical attention.
    Skin: Water flush immediately If this chemical contacts the skin, immediately flush the contaminated skin with water. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, immediately remove the clothing and flush the skin with water. Get medical attention promptly.
    Skin: Water flush promptly If this chemical contacts the skin, flush the contaminated skin with water promptly. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, immediately remove the clothing and flush the skin with water promptly. If irritation persists after washing, get medical attention.
    Skin: Water wash If this chemical contacts the skin, wash the contaminated skin with water.
    Skin: Water wash immediately If this chemical contacts the skin, immediately wash the contaminated skin with water. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, immediately remove the clothing and wash the skin with water. If symptoms occur after washing, get medical attention immediately.
    Skin: Water wash promptly If this chemical contacts the skin, promptly wash the contaminated skin with water. If this chemical penetrates the clothing, promptly remove the clothing and wash the skin with water. If irritation persists after washing, get medical attention.
    Breath: Respiratory support If a person breathes large amounts of this chemical, move the exposed person to fresh air at once. If breathing has stopped, perform artificial respiration. Keep the affected person warm and at rest. Get medical attention as soon as possible.
    Breath: Fresh air If a person breathes large amounts of this chemical, move the exposed person to fresh air at once. Other measures are usually unnecessary.
    Breath: Fresh air, 100% O2 If a person breathes large amounts of this chemical, move the exposed person to fresh air at once. If breathing has stopped, perform artificial respiration. When breathing is difficult, properly trained personnel may assist the affected person by administering 100% oxygen. Keep the affected person warm and at rest. Get medical attention as soon as possible.
    Swallow: Medical attention immediately If this chemical has been swallowed, get medical attention immediately.

    From: NIOSH

  • How To Use a First Aid Kit... What Your First Aid Course Didn't Teach You

    Brought to you by FirstAidMart.com and American CPR Training. How To Use a First Aid Kit... What Your First Aid Course Didn't Teach You: Free 22 minutes Safety Video. Learn the contents of a first aid kit and how to properly use them when providing first aid. Great for standalone training, refresher First Aid Training between full First Aid Certification Courses, or just to learn about performing basic first aid and utilizing those obscure first aid kit content items found in a comprehensive first aid kit. Also a great guide for what to look for when buying a first aid kit.
    Watch this informative First Aid Video Free to learn first aid today!

  • Sudden Infant Death

    Sudden Infant Death - learning more, but still a quandary...

    Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID)

    Sudden unexpected infant deaths are defined as deaths in infants less than 1 year of age that occur suddenly and unexpectedly, and whose cause of death are not immediately obvious prior to investigation.

    SUID possible causes: Poisoning or overdose, SIDS, Accidental suffocation, Unknown, Infections, Inborn errors of metabolism, Cardiac channelopathies.Each year in the United States, about 4,000 infants die suddenly of no immediately, obvious cause. About half of these Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID) are due to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), the leading cause of SUID and of all deaths among infants aged 1–12 months.

    The three most frequently reported causes are SIDS, cause unknown, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. In 2010, 2,063 deaths were reported as SIDS, 918 as cause unknown, and 629 as accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed.

    CDC supports new recommendations issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). These new recommendations aim to reduce the risk of infant death from SIDS as well as death from known sleep-related causes. Read the AAP fact sheet for more information.

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden death of an infant less than 1 year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough investigation is conducted, including a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history.

    SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1–12 months, and is the third leading cause overall of infant mortality in the United States. Although the overall rate of SIDS in the United States has declined by more than 50% since 1990, rates for non-Hispanic black and American Indian/Alaska Native infants remain disproportionately higher than the rest of the population. Reducing the risk of SIDS remains an important public health priority.

    Expanding Safe Infant Sleep Outreach

    The U.S. national campaign to reduce the risk of SIDS has entered a new phase and will now include all sleep-related SUIDs. The campaign, which has been known as the Back to Sleep Campaign, has been renamed the Safe to Sleep Campaign.

    Grand Rounds: Public Health Approaches to Reducing U.S. Infant Mortality This powerful session of Grand Rounds highlighted accomplishments and explored public health, clinical, and policy strategies to improve birth outcomes, with special consideration of high risk individuals, families, and communities.

    For a medical examiner or coroner to determine the cause of the death, a thorough case investigation including examination of the death scene and a review of the infant’s clinical history must be conducted. A complete autopsy needs to be performed, ideally using information gathered from the scene investigation. Even when a thorough investigation is conducted, it may be difficult to separate SIDS from other types of sudden unexpected infant deaths, especially accidental suffocation in bed.

    After a thorough case investigation, many of these sudden unexpected infant deaths may be explained. Poisoning, metabolic disorders, hyper or hypothermia, neglect and homicide, and suffocation are all explainable causes of SUID.

    • Infant CPR Anytime is an “all-in-one” learning kit that teaches the basic skills of Infant CPR, Infant choking relief and calling for help in approximately 20 minutes.  Infant CPR Anytime allows users to learn these life-saving skills anywhere, either in the comfort of their own home or in large group settings.  The kit teaches CPR using the AHA’s research-proven “practice-while-watching” technique, which allows users to watch an instructional DVD while practicing their skills on a personal manikin.  Infant CPR Anytime is designed to be shared with close family members and friends to help extend lifesaving training to more people.   Because more lives can be saved…. Product Specifications: The Infant CPR Anytime kit includes the following:  · 1 bilingual (English/Spanish) Infant CPR Anytime DVD  · 1 poly-bagged Mini Baby® CPR personal manikin · 1 bilingual (English/Spanish) Infant CPR Anytime skills reminder card  · 1 Mini Baby replacement lung · Manikin wipes Infant CPR Anytime is an “all-in-one” learning kit that teaches the basic skills of Infant CPR, Infant choking relief and calling for help in approximately 20 minutes.
      Infant CPR Anytime allows users to learn these life-saving skills anywhere, either in the comfort of their own home or in large group settings.
      The kit teaches CPR using the AHA’s research-proven “practice-while-watching” technique, which allows
      users to watch an instructional DVD while practicing their skills on a personal manikin.
      Infant CPR Anytime is designed to be shared with close family members and friends to help extend lifesaving training to more people. Because more lives can be saved….
      Product Specifications:
      The Infant CPR Anytime kit includes the following:
      · 1 bilingual (English/Spanish) Infant CPR Anytime DVD
      · 1 poly-bagged Mini Baby® CPR personal manikin
      · 1 bilingual (English/Spanish) Infant CPR Anytime skills reminder card
      · 1 Mini Baby replacement lung
      · Manikin wipes

      Learn CPR

    • CPR Home Learning System / CPR Anytime
    • Infant CPR Video

     

  • Innovations Expand Types of Seasonal Flu Vaccines

    Seasonal Flu Vaccine Vials (closeup 350wide)

    Many of the projected 135-139 million doses of influenza vaccines being produced for this flu season for use in the U.S. are now available to consumers from six manufacturers licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

    A variety of flu vaccines, including some that were not available during past influenza seasons, are available this year. This includes a vaccine that protects against four strains of the virus—two strains of type A and two of type B—rather than the traditional protection against three strains—two of type A and one of type B.

    In addition, a vaccine that is produced by growing the virus in cells rather than in eggs will be available for use in people 18 years of age and older.

    Unlike eggs, cells can be frozen for later use to grow large volumes of cells for the production of vaccine. This could provide a faster start-up time of the manufacturing process for any unexpected need.

    "New technologies are providing additional and diverse influenza vaccines, which helps to ensure an adequate supply in the Unites States," said Karen Midthun, M.D., director of FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

    Deluxe Germ Guard Personal Protection Pack w/ N95 Mask This 22-piece pack contains twice the supplies of the RC-650, including two (2) N95 masks. (12) Antimicrobial Cleansing Wipes .... read more American Red Cross Deluxe Germ Guard Personal Protection Pack w/ N95 Mask
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    "Influenza seasons are unpredictable and can be severe, even deadly," she added. "Last year's influenza season brought an increase in reported hospitalizations and deaths compared to recent years, and vaccination is the best defense to prevent influenza."

    All of the vaccines have been determined by FDA to be safe and effective. Getting vaccinated early, before flu season is in full swing, is key to prevention.

    An Exacting Process

    Manufacturing flu vaccines is an exacting and complex process. New vaccines must be produced each year because the viruses change from year to year and because the protection received the previous year diminishes over time.

    Each February, before one flu season ends, the FDA, World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other public health experts collaborate on collecting and reviewing data to identify the virus strains likely to cause the most illnesses in the next flu season. Based on that information and the recommendations of an FDA advisory committee, FDA selects the strains for manufacturers to include in their vaccines for use in the United States.

    Both egg-based flu vaccines and vaccines made with newer technologies work the same way; they trigger the immune system of the person receiving the vaccine to produce antibodies capable of attacking the virus.

    Vaccines are available in a variety of delivery methods, as a needle into muscle, as a needle injected into skin (approved for ages 18 through 64), and as a nasal spray (approved for people ages 2 through 49). In addition, one vaccine made in a high dose formulation is approved for people 65 years of age and older.

    The Procedure

    Under traditional egg-based production methods, once the influenza viruses have been selected, they are adapted for use in manufacturing and provided to companies licensed by FDA. The manufacturers inject each virus strain into eggs, which are incubated for several days to allow the virus to multiply.

    The virus-loaded fluid from the eggs is then harvested and purified.

    Manufacturers grow each strain separately then test it, including for potency. Then the strains are mixed and tested again. Once divided into standard dosages, the vaccines are put into containers such as vials, syringes or sprayers.

    Test results are submitted to FDA, along with samples from each batch, or lot. FDA reviews the test results and the samples before releasing the vaccine for distribution in the United States. Each lot, or batch, undergoes testing before release by FDA.

    FDA also inspects the manufacturing facilities on a regular basis and continues to monitor the safety of the vaccines once they are in use by the public.

    The level of effectiveness can depend on the health and immune system of individuals and how well a particular season's vaccine strains match circulating flu strains.

    There is a possibility of a less than optimal match between the virus strains predicted to circulate and the virus strains that end up causing the most illness. However, even if the vaccine and the circulating strains are not an exact match, the vaccine may reduce the severity of the illness and help prevent influenza-related complications.

    CDC recommends that everyone six months of age and older get vaccinated soon after vaccine becomes available. Those people for whom vaccination is particularly important include young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those who suffer from a variety of chronic illnesses, including asthma, diabetes and heart disease.

    Although the winter months are usually the peak month for flu activity, influenza disease in people typically begins appearing in October.

    FDA's website has specific information about each flu vaccine, including the FDA-approved age range of use. The website also provides the names of the influenza viruses included in this season's vaccines and an up-to-date list of the number of vaccine lots that have been released for each manufacturer.

    This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

  • Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America

    David J. Sencer CDC Museum open on Smithsonian magazine Museum Day Live!

    New exhibit examines health equality over last 120 years in the United States

    What

    The exhibit, Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America, looks back through history at how minority groups have experienced health problems differently, helps us understand why these differences persist, and examines our efforts to reduce and eliminate health disparities. The CDC Museum is open on Saturday in observance of Smithsonian magazine Museum Day Live! The exhibit is free and opens from September 28, 2013 through January 17, 2014.

    When

    Saturday, September 28, 2013, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. - Smithsonian magazine Museum Day Live!

    Where

    David J. Sencer CDC Museum
    1600 Clifton Road NE
    Atlanta, GA 30333
    http://www.cdc.gov/museum/index.htm

    Background

    Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America features historic photographs, documents and objects that illustrate the struggles of diverse groups to pursue their health as a basic human right.  Videos, including one of First Lady Michelle Obama talking about access to fresh fruits and vegetables, are integrated throughout, while interactive atlases illustrate the health of every community nationwide.

    The exhibitis organized and sponsored by the David J. Sencer CDC Museum, Office of the Associate Director for Communication, and the Office of Minority Health and Health Equity, CDC; with additional support from The California Endowment through the CDC Foundation.

    Special Note

    Admission and parking are free. Visitors need a valid, government-issued photo ID. Vehicle inspection is required.  The David J. Sencer CDC Museum is open Monday – Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. with extended hours to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday. The museum is closed on all federal holidays.  For more information, visit the museum website at http://www.cdc.gov/museum/visitor.htm.

    For more information on Museum Day Live!, visit http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/
    For more information on minority health, visit http://www.cdc.gov/minorityhealth/.

    ###
    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    Upcoming Exhibits

    Art in Science: Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases©

    February 5 - May 23, 2014

    The Prophet Fed by a Raven.Clive Hicks-Jenkins (b. 1951), The Prophet Fed by a Raven (2007) Acrylic on panel (62 cm × 82 cm), Courtesy of the artist, private collection, www.hicks-jenkins.com

    This popular exhibition highlighted the cover art of the journal, beginning with its inception in 1995. This second installment coincides with the Oxford University Press publication of Art in Science: Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases.

    Drawing from all art history, the covers of Emerging Infectious Diseases are intended to attract but also to surprise, delight, inspire, and enlighten with the premise that art humanizes and enhances scientific content and educates readers outside their areas of expertise about important unnoticed connections.  Through the years, art has breathed life into technical content. Journal covers have provided a fast tour of infectious disease emergence through the lives and times of artists and their craft and through literary and science connections.

    Celebrating the accomplishments of this remarkable journal, Art in Science showcases a complete set of covers from 2006 through today and selected enlargements.  Blending science and the arts offers a multidisciplinary approach to disease emergence: poverty and war, increased global travel, ongoing natural disasters, and human-animal interactions.


    What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?

    The Government’s Effect on The American Diet

    What's Cooking, Uncle Sam? logoOpening Fall 2014

    Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it.We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans.

    From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

  • Active Shooter: What You Can Do

    Interactive Web Based Course

    An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and other populated area. In most cases, active shooters use firearms and there is no pattern or method to their selection of victims. Active shooter situations are unpredictable and evolve quickly.

    Tactical professionals know that excessive equipment only gets in the way in an emergency. With that in mind, the Trauma Pak with QuikClot is designed to stop bleeding and control serious trauma at the scene so more advanced care can be sought later. Packed in a tough, waterproof pouch sized to fit in any pocket, the Trauma Pak with QuikClot is easy to deploy: just rip open, pull out the QuikClot dressing to quickly apply to any life-threatening bleeding Tactical professionals know that excessive equipment only gets in the way in an emergency. With that in mind, the Trauma Pak with QuikClot is designed to stop bleeding and control serious trauma at the scene so more advanced care can be sought later. Packed in a tough, waterproof pouch sized to fit in any pocket, the Trauma Pak with QuikClot is easy to deploy: just rip open, pull out the QuikClot dressing to quickly apply to any life-threatening bleeding

    All employees can help prevent and prepare for potential active shooter situations. This course provides guidance to individuals, including managers and employees, so that they can prepare to respond to an active shooter situation.

    This course is not written for law enforcement officers, but for non-law enforcement employees. The material may provide law enforcement officers information on recommended actions for non-law enforcement employees to take should they be confronted with an active shooter situation.

    Course Objectives:

    Upon completing this course, the participant will be able to:

    1. Describe actions to take when confronted with an active shooter and responding law enforcement officials.
    2. Recognize potential workplace violence indicators.
    3. Describe actions to take to prevent and prepare for potential active shooter incidents.
    4. Describe how to manage the consequences of an active shooter incident.

    Primary Audience: All individuals, including managers and employees.

    Prerequisites: None

    CEUs: 0.1

    Course Length: 1 hour (Self Paced)

    Access the free online course HERE

  • Mobile Medical Apps

    FDAFDA has issued guidelines to give companies that create mobile medical applications, or "apps," a clear and predictable roadmap to help them determine whether or not their apps for smartphones and tablets will be the focus of FDA's oversight.

    Keeping Up with Progress in Mobile Medical Apps

    Patients with diabetes can already use smartphones to monitor the level of sugar in their blood, and doctors can whip out their tablets to read X-rays and perform ultrasounds or electrocardiograms.

    AppThose functions represent just the tip of the iceberg in a coming revolution in mobile medical applications, or "apps," intended for use on mobile phones and tablets. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) encourages innovation and is excited about the prospects that mobile medical apps offer for providing better care and greater patient involvement in their own health.

    At the same time, FDA wants to ensure the safety and effectiveness of the small percentage of mobile medical apps that could be harmful if they didn't work properly.

    FDA has issued a guidance document to give mobile app creators a clear and predictable roadmap to help them determine whether or not their products will be the focus of FDA's oversight. To protect consumers and encourage innovation, while at the same time providing the same level of confidence consumers have with other medical devices, the guidance document states that FDA will focus its oversight on medical mobile apps that meet the definition of device in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and are intended to:

    • transform a mobile device into a medical device regulated by FDA; or
    • be used as an accessory to a medical device regulated by the FDA.

    FDA intends to exercise enforcement discretion for other mobile apps. This focuses FDA's regulatory priorities on the small subset of mobile medical apps that could present a greater risk to health.

    Examples Offer Clarity

    Here is an example that demonstrates how this plays out in the real world: FDA oversees software medical devices that calculate the amount of radiation that should be given to a cancer patient. If the device were to give the wrong dose recommendation, it clearly would threaten the patient's health. Logically, a mobile medical app that calculates radiation dosage should have the same FDA oversight as the traditional device.

    The draft guidance for mobile medical apps, published in July 2011, elicited more than 130 public comments that the FDA reviewed and considered when writing the final guidance.

    "Most were positive; people generally liked the draft proposal and understood which types of mobile medical apps we would regulate," says Bakul Patel, M.S., MBA, senior policy advisor to the director of FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. However, some who commented asked for more examples of what would not fall within the focus of FDA's regulatory oversight—a suggestion incorporated in the final guidance just issued.

    Patel explained, for example, that FDA would regulate a mobile medical app that helps measure blood pressure by controlling the inflation and deflation of a blood pressure cuff (a blood pressure monitor), just as it regulates traditional devices that measure blood pressure. A false reading by either blood pressure device would deliver a false diagnosis and perhaps even lead to treatment that could endanger patients.

    However, although a mobile app that doctors or patients use to log and track trends with their blood pressure is a medical device, as explained in the final mobile medical app guidance, such mobile apps would not fall within the current focus of FDA's regulatory oversight. Similarly, mobile medical apps that recommend calorie or carbohydrate intakes to people who track what they eat also are not within the current focus of FDA's regulatory oversight. While such mobile apps may have health implications, FDA believes the risks posed by these devices are low and such apps can empower patients to be more engaged in their health care.

    In the final mobile medical apps guidance, FDA clarifies that its mobile medical apps policy does not apply to the use of smartphones or tablets themselves. Providers of mobile medical apps, such as the iTunes app store, would not be treated as medical device manufacturers.

    A Growing Trend

    The mobile app market is anticipated to grow 25 percent annually for some time, according to the market research firm Kalorama Information; companies are investing record amounts in developing new health apps. Consumers will be finding more and more options from which to choose.

    FDA intends to stay current with the expertise needed to evaluate mobile medical apps for which safe use and accuracy are critical to public health by hiring additional skilled engineers, including software engineers, and medical officers with device expertise. FDA also works closely with experts in academia and is now reviewing its current practices involved in evaluating software used in mobile medical apps.

    So far, FDA has cleared nearly 100 mobile medical apps. These mobile medical apps include blood pressure monitors, apps that send real-time readings of electrocardiographs to your doctor, and apps that access vital signs for use in emergency cardiac care. Despite the growth of mobile medical apps, consumers should still talk to their health care providers about decisions related to their health care.

    "Mobile apps are unleashing amazing creativity, and we intend to encourage these exciting innovations," says Patel. "At the same time, we have set risk-based priorities and are focusing FDA's oversight on mobile apps that are devices for which safety and effectiveness are critical."

    This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

    Related Consumer Updates

  • Positive relationship factors may help break cycle of child maltreatment

    The Journal of Adolescent Health released a special supplement investigating the role of safe, stable, nurturing relationships (SSNRs) and social contexts in the cycle of child maltreatment across generations. Efforts focused on enhancing SSNRs between parents and children, as well as between parents and other adults, may be a helpful prevention strategy for breaking the cycle of child maltreatment and promoting life-long health.

    The special issue includes the following:

    • Examining the Role of Safe, Stable, and Nurturing Relationships in the Intergenerational Continuity of Child Maltreatment—Introduction to the Special Issue
    • Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships Break the Intergenerational Cycle of Abuse: A Prospective Nationally Representative Cohort of Children in the United Kingdom
    • Disrupting Intergenerational Continuity in Harsh and Abusive Parenting: The Importance of a Nurturing Relationship with a Romantic Partner
    • Tests of the Mitigating Effects of Caring and Supporting Relationships in the Study of Abusive Disciplining Over Two Generations
    • Breaking the Cycle of Maltreatment: The Role of Safe, Stable, and Nurturing Relationships
    • Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships as a Moderator of Intergenerational Continuity of Child Maltreatment: A Meta-Analysis
    • The Complex Etiology and Lasting Consequences of Child Maltreatment
    • Advances in Understanding Intergenerational Transmission of Parenting Practices and the Role of Safe, Stable, and Nurturing Relationships: Comments on a Promising Approach, Practical Application, and Some Cautions

    Where

    Journal of Adolescent Health

    Findings
    Key findings emerged on the positive effect of SSNRs on disrupting the transmission of child maltreatment across generations:

    • See our Child Safety Products! See our Child Safety Products!

      Parents who were maltreated as children were more likely to have children who were also maltreated.

    • SSNRs may help break the cycle of maltreatment from parent to child.
    • Supportive and nurturing relationships for adults can be protective for children

    For more information on child maltreatment prevention, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/childmaltreatment/index.html

    For more information on creating SSNRs, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/childmaltreatment/essentials/index.html

    For more information on the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/ace

    For more information on CDC’s Public Health Leadership Initiative, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/phl/index.html

  • September is National Preparedness Month

    September is National Preparedness Month
    National Preparedness Month You can be the hero theme logo

    National Preparedness Month is an effort involving a broad range of agencies, spearheaded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to help Individuals and Businesses throughout our Nation prepare for any crisis we may face. Depending upon one’s location and situation, “Disaster” can mean anything from natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods to cyber incidents, and even acts of terrorism.

    As the White House reminded us in its National Preparedness Month 2013 Proclamation, it is every American’s responsibility to be prepared. By planning for emergencies, individuals can protect themselves and their families while also contributing to their communities’ resilience. During National Preparedness Month, we refocus our efforts on readying ourselves, our families, our neighborhoods, our workplaces, and our Nation. FirstAidMart.com offers this page of resources to help you be prepared.

    “Pre-pare” ~ “Pre” means before… not after. Preparation is not reaction to a threat or incident – it is planning and equipping oneself ahead of a time when need may arise. ? Get a Kit: See all the Disaster Kits and Survival Supplies below ? Make a Plan: See our Survival Checklists and Resources in the Quick Links ? Be Informed: Watch our videos and infographics ?Get Involved: Share this information with Friends, Family & Co-Workers – Pin it, Post on Facebook, Tweet about it – share via your favorite channels – all our resources are free to use and share!


    Disaster & Survival Supplies to Help You Be The Hero

    National Preparedness Month is a campaign to build and sustain national preparedness with private sector, non-profit, and community leaders and all levels of government. The campaign is based on science, research and development, public outreach, and broad participation. It aims to inspire Americans of all ages to increase their preparedness by moving from awareness to action. This year’s National Preparedness Month theme, “You Can Be the Hero,” asks all Americans to ready themselves to assist in case of emergency. Anyone can improve their preparedness by making or reviewing emergency plans with their family and by building a disaster kit with food, water, and essential supplies.
    Here are all the Emergency Disaster Survival Supplies and Gear you might need:

  • Protect Older Adults from Falls and Injury

    Senior-FallWe all want to protect our family members as they age and help them stay safe, secure, and independent.

    Knowing how to protect older adults from falls, a leading cause of injury, is a step toward this goal.In recognition of National Fall Prevention Awareness Day, September 22, 2013, learn how you can help older adults reduce their risk of falling and live better and longer:

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