Monthly Archives: June 2013

  • Cancer Survivorship

    Survival & Recovery from Cancer is on the Upswing!

    Millions of Americans are cancer survivors, living with, through, and beyond cancer. As the number of cancer survivors grows, CDC is working with partner organizations to help survivors throughout their cancer experience.

    The Good News

    • People are living longer after a cancer diagnosis.
    • Nearly 12 million Americans are alive after being told they have cancer.
    • Due to medical advances, people are living many years after a cancer diagnosis.
    • About two-thirds of people with cancer are expected to live at least 5 years after diagnosis.
    Living With, Through, and Beyond Cancer

    all-inclusive-cancer-awarenessCancer survivors often face physical, emotional, social, and financial challenges as a result of their cancer diagnosis and treatment. Also, survivors are at greater risk of having their first cancer recur, developing second cancers, and having other health conditions due to—

    • The immediate and long-term effects of treatment.
    • Behavioral risk factors (e.g., alcohol and tobacco use, sedentary behavior, dietary factors, and excessive sun exposure).
    • Genetics.
    • Environmental risk factors such as exposure to secondhand smoke, radon gas, asbestos, and certain chemicals.

    Cancer survivorship affects not only the cancer patient, but also his or her family members, friends, and neighbors who provide support and help with daily tasks.

    Do your part:

    Learn more:

     

  • The Smithsonian Institution’s first state-of-the-art exhibition about genome science, Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code

    New exhibition makes genome accessible to public

    Unique NIH-Smithsonian collaboration unlocks the present and future of genome science...

    Genome1The Smithsonian Institution’s first state-of-the-art exhibition about genome science, Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code, opens Friday, June 14, 2013, at the National Museum of Natural History in partnership with the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), a part of the National Institutes of Health.

    The exhibition examines the complexities of the genome — the complete set of genetic or hereditary material of a living organism — and chronicles the remarkable breakthroughs that have taken place since the completion of the Human Genome Project a decade ago. With cutting-edge interactives, 3D models, custom animations and engaging videos of real-life stories, the exhibition examines both the benefits and the challenges that genomics presents to modern society.

    “This exhibition reflects a remarkably productive collaboration between components of two scientific icons of the U.S. government — the Smithsonian Institution and the National Institutes of Health,” said Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D., director of NHGRI, one of the 27 institutes and centers that make up NIH. “Our ability to showcase the science of genomics to the roughly 7 million annual visitors of the National Museum of Natural History is profoundly exciting for the broader genomics research community.”

    Genome2The exhibition’sopening celebrates the anniversaries of two landmark scientific discoveries: the 10th anniversary of the Human Genome Project’s completion and the 60th anniversary of Drs. James Watson’s and Francis Crick’s discovery of DNA’s double-helical structure. It will be open at the National Museum of Natural History through September 2014, after which the exhibition will travel throughout North America for about five years.

    “Genomic research is a vital tool for exploring the mysteries of the natural world and it is an important part of Smithsonian science,” said Kirk Johnson, the Sant Director of the National Museum of Natural History. “Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code will help our visitors understand how genomics is transforming what we know about ourselves and how we make important life decisions.”

    Genome3From the moment visitors enter the approximately 2,900 square-foot exhibition, they will find themselves immersed in an interactive, futuristic environment that communicates the revolutionary nature of genomics. The exhibition gives visitors a window into genomes that provides new ways of looking at themselves as individuals, as members of a family and a species, and as part of the diversity of life on Earth.

    Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code is organized around three content areas offering visitors personalized and interactive experiences that explore what a genome is (The Genome Within Us), how it relates to medicine and health (Your Genome, Your Health), and how it connects humans to all of life on the planet (Connections: Natural World and Genomic Journey). Within each gallery, numerous topics are explored through the latest imagery on genomics, hands-on and media interactives, videos and other engaging content. Through examples of ways that genome science can affect their lives in ordinary and extraordinary ways, visitors will also come to learn how genomics can affect perspectives about health, identity, and the place of humans in the natural world.

    Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code will take visitors on a genomic journey from the present to the future:

    Genome4The Genome Within Us: Upon arrival, museum-goers will be oriented at the center of the exhibition where they will explore how the genome is a part of their own bodies. Visitors will discover what a genome is, where it is located in the human body (in the cell nucleus), and how it works to regulate life, through introductory videos produced by the History channel. Visitors will see three-dimensional models of a human genome and watch interviews with Human Genome Project researchers. Visitors can also participate in a social media interactive where they can explore the ethical, legal, and social implications of advancing DNA sequencing technologies, submit their responses on an interactive station and find out how their views compare with those of other visitors. An electronic news ticker display will provide an ongoing stream of recent developments in genomics.

    Your Genome, Your Health: Guests can explore the many ways in which genome sequencing benefits patients through improved health care. They can learn about genes, genomic solutions to mysterious medical diseases, and, through a futuristic DNA interactive, search for the right medicine for a given disease. An interactive puzzle allows visitors to learn how genetic, environmental, and random factors influence risk for a particular disease.

    Genome5Connections: Natural World and Genomic Journey: Visitors will learn about the ways that genomes reflect the connection of all life on the planet, human ancestry and evolution — and even human society. There will be an opportunity to learn more about how the Smithsonian is using new genomic technologies to preserve genetic diversity and study changes in our environment through the Global Genome Initiative and GGI’s growing biorepository.

    “Today, the Smithsonian is a leader in utilizing genomic research to understand the diversity of life on earth,” said Jonathan Coddington, Ph.D., associate director for science at the National Museum of Natural History. “This exhibition provides a unique opportunity to showcase the cutting edge biotechnological research going on behind-the-scenes at the museum, and features some of our scientists’ work on hot topics like bird strikes, butterflies, wine grapes, bio-coding, Tasmanian devils and the Global Genome Initiative. Thanks to genomics, we now have the tools to sequence every organism on the planet, allowing us to preserve genetic diversity, study changes in our environment and learn more about how these changes affect all life on earth.”

    In addition to the exhibition, a special educational website, Unlocking Life’s Code , was created to support the exhibition and provide additional educational materials beyond the walls of the museum. A program of ongoing educational events in Washington, D.C., is also being developed and will be announced on the website.

    “Collaborating with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in the development of the genome exhibition created an opportunity to educate the public about advances in genomics research” said Vence L. Bonham, Jr., J.D., chief of the education branch in NHGRI’s Division of Policy, Communications and Education. “NHGRI engages communities across the country to explore genomics and health, but this is the first collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution, which will reach millions of visitors at the National Museum of Natural History.”

    The exhibition was made possible through the generous support of the Life Technologies Foundation, and other important sponsors, including Johnson & Johnson, Ancestry.com and The Brin Wojcicki Foundation.

    Additional information for media is available at www.genome.gov/27554010. For images of Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code and other related photos, please visit http://newsdesk.si.edu/photos .

    The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, located at 10th Street and Constitution Avenue N.W., Washington, D.C., is the world’s most visited natural history museum and is open every day from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. with extended evening hours in the summer. It also houses the world’s largest collection of natural history specimens, which are managed by a research staff of more than 100 Ph.D.-level scientists. Learn more at http://www.nmh.si.edu  or on the museum’s social media platforms.

    NHGRI is one of the 27 institutes and centers at the National Institutes of Health, which is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NHGRI conducts genomics research in its own labs in Maryland, as well supports genomics research at institutions across the country. Additional information about NHGRI can be found at http://www.genome.gov.

  • The National Institutes of Health plans to substantially reduce the use of chimpanzees biomedical research

    NIH to reduce significantly the use of chimpanzees in research

    “Americans have benefitted greatly from the chimpanzees’ service to biomedical research, but new scientific methods and technologies have rendered their use in research largely unnecessary,” said Dr. Collins. “Their likeness to humans has made them uniquely valuable for certain types of research, but also demands greater justification for their use. After extensive consideration with the expert guidance of many, I am confident that greatly reducing their use in biomedical research is scientifically sound and the right thing to do.”

    Pumpkin, a 24-year-old chimpanzee at the Alamogordo Primate Facility, N.M., loves coconuts and kiddie swimming pools. APF is a chimpanzee reserve where no research is conducted. Pumpkin, a 24-year-old chimpanzee at the Alamogordo Primate Facility, N.M., loves coconuts and kiddie swimming pools. APF is a chimpanzee reserve where no research is conducted.

    What do you think about using animals in research to prolong or improve Human life?

    • Comment on this post and let us know!

     

     

     

     

     

    The National Institutes of Health plans to substantially reduce the use of chimpanzees in NIH-funded biomedical research and designate for retirement most of the chimpanzees it currently owns or supports. NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. accepted most of the recommendations made by an independent advisory council for implementing a set of principles and criteria  defined by the Institute of Medicine for the use of chimpanzees in NIH-funded research.

    NIH plans to retain but not breed up to 50 chimpanzees for future biomedical research. The chimpanzees that will remain available for research will be selected based on research projects that meet the IOM’s principles and criteria for NIH funding. The chimpanzees designated for retirement could eventually join more than 150 other chimpanzees already in the Federal Sanctuary System. The Federal Sanctuary System was established in 2002 by the Chimpanzee Health Improvement, Maintenance and Protection (CHIMP) Act  and Chimp Haven operates the Federal Sanctuary System, which is overseen by NIH.

    In accepting the recommendations, NIH plans to:

    • retain but not breed a small fraction of chimpanzees for future research that meets the IOM principles and criteria
    • provide ethologically appropriate facilities (i.e., as would occur in their natural environment) for those chimpanzees as defined by NIH based on the advisory council recommendations and with space requirements yet to be determined
    • establish a review panel to consider research projects proposing the use of chimpanzees with the IOM principles and criteria after projects have cleared the NIH peer review process
    • wind down research projects using NIH-owned or -supported chimpanzees that do not meet the IOM principles and criteria in a way that preserves the research and minimizes the impact on the animals
    • retire the majority of the NIH-owned chimpanzees deemed unnecessary for biomedical research to the Federal Sanctuary System contingent upon resources and space availability in the sanctuary system

    Some technical changes in NIH’s legal authority are needed to retire additional chimpanzees to the Federal Sanctuary System. NIH will continue working with Congress to remedy a provision that currently limits the amount of financial resources NIH may put toward retiring chimpanzees and caring for them in the Federal Sanctuary System.

    While broadly accepting the recommendations of ethologically appropriate facilities, NIH did not accept, due to the lack of scientific consensus, the recommendation that the primary living space of research chimpanzees be at least 1,000 square feet per chimpanzee. NIH will engage chimpanzee behavior and facilities experts to determine the appropriate minimum space requirement for research chimpanzees.

    “Today’s decision by NIH culminates more than two years of intensive deliberations among NIH leadership, independent chimpanzee experts, researchers, bioethicists, and members of the public,” said James M. Anderson, M.D., Ph.D., NIH deputy director for program coordination, planning, and strategic initiatives, whose division oversees the NIH Chimpanzee Management Program. “We are grateful to all who have contributed their insight and expertise during the advisory process.”

    NIH’s full response to the recommendations and public comments can be found here: http://dpcpsi.nih.gov/council/working_group.aspx.

    The events that led to today’s decision by NIH are:

    Image of two chimpanzees

    Chimpanzees at Chimp Haven are often seen grooming and playing with one another. Courtesy: Chimp Haven

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) recently issued a proposed rule (PDF - 695KB) External Web Site Policy that lists captive chimpanzees as endangered. NIH expects to adapt its policies for research projects using chimpanzees to comply with the conservation guidelines that the USFWS establishes in a potential final rule.

    For images and video related to this release, visit http://www.nih.gov/news/chimpanzees/index.htm.

    The Office of the Director, the central office at NIH, is responsible for setting policy for NIH, which includes 27 Institutes and Centers. This involves planning, managing, and coordinating the programs and activities of all NIH components. The Office of the Director also includes program offices which are responsible for stimulating specific areas of research throughout NIH. Additional information is available at http://www.nih.gov/icd/od.

    About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

  • Keeping Food Safe - During a power outage, keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed.

    What You Need to Know When the Power Goes Out Unexpectedly

    Candle-IDeaHIGHLIGHTS

    • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, use generators, pressure washers, grills, and similar items outdoors only.
    • If the power is out longer than two hours, throw away food that has a temperature higher than 40°F.
    • Check with local authorities to be sure your water is safe.
    • In hot weather, stay cool and drink plenty of fluids to prevent heat-related illness.
    • In cold weather, wear layers of clothing, which help to keep in body heat.
    • Avoid power lines and use electric tools and appliances safely to prevent electrical shock.
    IN THIS POST:
    • Food Safety
    • Safe Drinking Water
    • Extreme Heat and Cold
    • First Aid for Electrical Shock
    • Power Line Hazards & Cars
    • Avoid Carbon Monoxide
    • Dangers of Gasoline Siphoning
    • Safety at Work During Power Recovery
    • Be Prepared for an Emergency
    • Impact of Power Outage on Vaccine Storage

    Continue reading

  • OSHA urges increased safety awareness in fireworks industry in advance of July 4 celebrations

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is urging the fireworks and pyrotechnics industry to be vigilant in protecting workers from hazards while manufacturing, storing, transporting, displaying and selling fireworks for public events.

    Fireworks are beautiful, but can be dangerous when proper precautions are not observed. Fireworks are beautiful, but can be dangerous when proper precautions are not observed.

    News Release

    OSHA News Release: [06/24/2013]
    Contact Name: Adriano Llosa or Jesse Lawder
    Phone Number: (202) 693-4686 or x4659
    Email:
    Llosa.Adriano.t@dol.gov or Lawder.Jesse@dol.gov
    Release Number: 13-1249-NAT

    OSHA urges increased safety awareness in fireworks industry in advance of
    July 4 celebrations

    WASHINGTON — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is urging the fireworks and pyrotechnics industry to be vigilant in protecting workers from hazards while manufacturing, storing, transporting, displaying and selling fireworks for public events.

    "As we look forward to July 4 celebrations with fireworks and festivities, we must also consider the safety of workers who handle pyrotechnics," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. "Employers are responsible for keeping everyone safe on the job and taking appropriate measures to protect workers from serious injuries or death."

    In March 2012, three workers suffered serious burns caused by an explosion at Global Pyrotechnic Solutions Inc. OSHA cited the Dittmer, Mo., company nearly $117,000 for safety violations relating to explosive hazards.

    OSHA's pyrotechnics directive, Compliance Policy for Manufacture, Storage, Sale, Handling, Use and Display of Pyrotechnics, provides inspection guidance and OSHA requirements as they apply to pyrotechnics facilities and operations. The directive is available at http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/Directive_pdf/CPL_02-01-053.pdf.

    OSHA's Web page on the pyrotechnics industry addresses retail sales of fireworks and fireworks displays. Information on common hazards and solutions found in both areas of the industry, and downloadable safety posters for workplaces are available at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/pyrotechnic/index.html. It also includes a video, available at http://www.osha.gov/video/fireworks/index.html, which demonstrates best industry practices for retail sales and manufacturers based on National Fire Protection Association consensus standards.

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

    Burn Care When a burn occurs, seconds count. we carry numerous products that are effective, versatile and approved for emergency first aid burn treatment in a pre-hospital setting. They stop the burn progression, cool the burned area, relieve pain and prevent further injury. Burn Care
    When a burn occurs, seconds count. we carry numerous products that are effective, versatile and approved for emergency first aid burn treatment in a pre-hospital setting. They stop the burn progression, cool the burned area, relieve pain and prevent further injury. Click the image for Burn First Aid Products!
  • Summer means Lightning Deaths: Learn Lightning Safety & Separate Myth from Reality

    LightningBoltDisaster, Survival, Preparation -

    Summer is the peak season for lightning-related deaths and injuries, though people are struck by lightning year-round.

    Preparedness doesn't just mean stocking up on Survival Gear (although you should!) - It also means common sense, which includes learning about hazards - like Lightning.

    The National Weather Service provides a wide range of information about lightning, including these facts and tips:

    General Tips

    • No outdoor area is safe when you hear thunder.
    • If you hear thunder, find a safe indoor shelter (a substantial building or enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with the windows up).

    Indoor Safety Tips

    • Stay off corded phones, computers, and other electrical equipment.
    • Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths, and faucets.
    • Stay away from porches, windows, and doors.
    • Never lie on concrete floors or lean against concrete walls.

    Outdoor Safety Tips

    No outdoor area is safe during a thunderstorm, but if you're caught outside with no safe shelter options, take these steps to reduce your risk of being struck by lightning:

    • Come down from elevated areas.
    • Never lie flat on the ground.
    • Never shelter under an isolated tree.
    • Never use a cliff or rocky overhang for shelter.
    • Immediately get out and away from ponds, lakes, and other bodies of water.
    • Stay away from objects that conduct electricity, such as wire fences.

    Read some interesting myths and facts about lightning.

    Disaster, Survival, & Preparation! 
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, too, you should Check your Emergency Supplies:

    • Count your stock... is it enough?
    • Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    • Keep cash on hand
    • Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    • Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!

    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.

  • HIV / AIDS Awareness - National HIV Testing Day is June 27

    AidsGovNational HIV Testing Day (June 27) serves as a reminder of the importance of HIV testing.Use these resources to answer your questions about HIV testing:

    • HIV Testing Locations - Enter your ZIP code to find a testing location near you, including those that offer free HIV tests.
    • Types of HIV Tests - Different HIV tests are used in different situations, but the antibody test is the most common.
    • Privacy Issues - Learn about privacy aspects of HIV testing and the difference between "confidential testing" and "anonymous testing."
    • Test Result Accuracy - Read about the accuracy of test results and find out what steps to take after getting a positive or negative result.

    Visit AIDS.gov for more information about HIV/AIDS.

  • Key Facts about Hurricane Readiness

    wooden_breakwater_-_hdrThe Hurricane Readiness Fact Sheet combines all of the key content of the CDC Hurricanes Web site into one downloadable, printable file. By printing this Portable Document Format (PDF) file, you will have important hurricane health and safety information available even when you're without power or Internet service.

    Download Fact Sheet

    List of Web Pages with Fact Sheet Information

    Prepare and Endure! Disaster, Survival, & Preparation!
    Think about preparedness; at home, at work, at school, even in your car.
    What should you do? Check your Emergency Plan and Evacuation Routes everywhere you normally spend time. Make sure you have an out of State contact for you, your friends and your family (long distance phone service is usually restored before local - and mobile services and internet will likely not work in a major disaster.)
    Of course, too, you should Check your Emergency Supplies:
    Count your stock... is it enough?
    Check your expiration dates (food, water, batteries)
    Keep cash on hand
    Don't let your gas tank get below half-full
    Think-Plan-Prepare-Survive!
    Survival Gear: Disaster, Emergency Preparedness, Camping & Survival Supply
    72 Hour Emergency Preparedness Supplies for Earthquake, Hurricane, Tornado, Twister, Nuclear Disasters, Wilderness Survival & More… C.E.R.T. & F.E.M.A.
  • Safety Topics? Download Free Safety Articles!

    Free Safety Articles to Download!

    Free Safety Topics Articles for Safety Meetings and learning about safety Free Safety Topics Articles for Safety Meetings and learning about safety
    See more Safety Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms & More... See more Safety Books, Manuals, CDs, DVDs, Videos, Training Materials, Safety Kits, Forms & More...
  • Happy First Day of Summer! Be Safe and Have FUN!

    Summer Safety Survival Guide: 10 Tips to Keep Your Family Safe

    Summer Safety Summer Safety

    Summer is the time for outdoor cookouts, pool parties and backyard play dates – not a time for bandaging scrapes, nursing burns – or worse. Learn these important summer safety tips and make sure everyone in your family knows them by heart too. That way, it will be a summer to remember, for all the right reasons.

    Pool Safety

    1. Supervise constantly: Good supervision means you are able to scan the pool area every 20 seconds and be able to reach the pool in 10 seconds.
    2. Put multiple safety barriers between children and the pool: Install a four-foot fence with a self-closing, self-latching gate that has a locking mechanism beyond a child’s reach. Also cut overhanging tree limbs and remove chairs or ladders from the pool area to prevent children from climbing over the fence surrounding the pool.
    3. Always check the pool first if a child is missing: Child drowning is often a silent death that alerts no one with splashes or yells for help. Many drowning accidents happen when children have been missing for less than five minutes.
    4. Empty small wading pools and remove all toys after children are through playing: Infants can drown in just a few inches of water. Floats, balls and other toys may attract children to the pool when it is unattended.

    Backyard Safety

    1. Keep grills at least 10 feet from any structure: Grilling mishaps cause more than 8,300 fires and send 3,000 people to the emergency room each year. Never grill indoors or near garages or porches, even if it’s raining.
    2. Have a spray bottle or fire extinguisher handy: An unexpected flare up can burn more than your burgers. Use a spray bottle to avoid flare ups and have a fire extinguisher nearby. Also, coals get hot – in some cases up to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit – so dispose of charcoal away from kids and pets and cool it down with a hose.
    3. Never use gasoline or kerosene to light a charcoal fire: Both can cause an explosion. When grilling, use insulated, flame-retardant mitts and long-handled barbeque tongs and utensils to handle food and coals.
    4. Check gas grill hoses for cracking, brittleness, holes and leaks: If the tank valve or grill needs repair, do not attempt to do it yourself. Take it to your local home improvement store or qualified appliance repair person.
    5. Inspect outdoor decorative lights carefully: Some families add backyard ambience with outdoor decorative lighting. Do not connect more than three midget light string sets together. Light strings with screw-in bulbs should have a maximum of 50 bulbs connected together. Be sure to use light strings bearing the UL Mark, which means UL has tested samples of the product for risk of fire, electric shock and other hazards.

    Playground Safety

    1. Carefully inspect backyard playground equipment: According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, 70 percent of all playground-related deaths occur on home playground equipment. Make sure equipment is anchored safely in the ground, all equipment pieces are in good working order, S-hooks are entirely closed and bolts are not protruding.

    Article Courtesy of Safety at Home

    Remember your First Aid Kit, Insect Repellent & Sunscreen

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